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GOD HIMSELF SERVES.pdf

GOD HIMSELF SERVES.pdf

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY J. R. MILLER


THE Messiah is spoken of in
the Old Testament many
times as the Servant of
the Lord. This may seem
a strange name to give to
one of such high honor.
We beHeve that He was divine. How then
could He be the Servant of God ? Is there not
here a contradiction in terms.? A servant fills
a lowly and a subordinate place. He is one
who does the will of another. He does not be-
long to himself. He cannot make and carry
out his own plans. He represents another and
comes and goes at the call of another. He
receives directions and must obey without
question, without liberty of choice. How then
could the Son of God be the Servant of the
Lord.?
BY J. R. MILLER


THE Messiah is spoken of in
the Old Testament many
times as the Servant of
the Lord. This may seem
a strange name to give to
one of such high honor.
We beHeve that He was divine. How then
could He be the Servant of God ? Is there not
here a contradiction in terms.? A servant fills
a lowly and a subordinate place. He is one
who does the will of another. He does not be-
long to himself. He cannot make and carry
out his own plans. He represents another and
comes and goes at the call of another. He
receives directions and must obey without
question, without liberty of choice. How then
could the Son of God be the Servant of the
Lord.?

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Nov 06, 2013
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GOD HIMSELF SERVESBY J. R. MILLER THE Messiah is spoken of inthe Old Testament manytimes as the Servant of the Lord. This may seema strange name to give toone of such high honor.We beHeve that He was divine. How thencould He be the Servant of God ? Is there nothere a contradiction in terms.? A servant fillsa lowly and a subordinate place. He is onewho does the will of another. He does not be-long to himself. He cannot make and carryout his own plans. He represents another andcomes and goes at the call of another. Hereceives directions and must obey withoutquestion, without liberty of choice. How thencould the Son of God be the Servant of theLord.?We have but to turn to the New Testamentto find that Jesus gladly accepted the name[29]31 f cart (KarDenand the place of sem^ant. He was the Servantof the Lord in His submission of His hfe toHis Father's will, and His Father's plan. Hisfirst recorded words were : " Wist ye not that I
 
must be about My Father's business ? " At thelast He declared that He had accomplishedall that the Father had given Him to do. Henever did His own will, but always God's will.Then, in His relation to men He was also aServant. When, at the Last Supper, His dis-ciples contended among themselves as to whichwas greatest, Jesus told them that the world'sstandard was not to be the standard amongthem. " But he that is greatest among you,let him be as the younger; and he that ischief, as he that doth serve." Then Headded : " I am in the midst of you as he thatserveth." Rising from supper, and girdingHimself as a serv^ant. He then v/ashed Hisdisciples' feet, thus doing the work of thelowest and most menial sers^ant.There is no contradiction, therefore, betweenthe tiTith of the divine Sonship and this,that He was also the Sers^ant of the Lord.[30]C]^e ^crbant of t^t LorDService is not lowly — it is divine. God Him-self serves. Those highest in rank in thisworld are they that serve the most cheerfully,the most self -forget fully. " Ich dien " is themotto under the triple plume of the Princeof Wales. The origin of the motto dates back more than five hundred and fifty years. It wasoriginally the motto of John of Luxemburg,King of Bohemia, who was killed at the bat-tle of Crecy in 1346. Edward found the Kingdead on the field, with the royal flag on hisbreast, and under the crest of three ostrichfeathers the words, " Ich dien " — " I serve."Edward gave it to his son, and now for more
 
than five hundred and fifty years it has beenan adopted sign, a heritage of voluntaryservice. There could be no more royal mottofor one to wear who is preparing to rule. Atrue king is the nation's first servant. Thenoblest and most manly man in any commu-nity is he who most devotedly, most unself-ishly, with sincerest love and interest, serveshis fellow-men.If we would but get this law of service into[31]a l$tan (KatDenall our home life, it would make us sweetlythoughtful of every one and lead us tocountless attentions and services which wouldchange our homes into places of heavenlikelove. If we would learn to serve as Christ did,it would make us think of others about us,not as those from whom we may get somegain, exact some attention or promotion, butas those to whom we may impart some good,render some service.In one passage in Isaiah there is a wonderfulpicture of this Servant of the Lord. He worksquietly. " He will not cry, nor lift up Hisvoice, nor cause it to be heard in the street."That was not true in those times of the greatmen of the world who sought to make an im-pression. They gathered armies and made theearth tremble with their tread. Men were sup-posed to be powerful according to the noisethey made. But of the Messiah it was said,

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