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THE FILIPINO MIND_ President Manuel A Roxas and his pro-Americanism.pdf

THE FILIPINO MIND_ President Manuel A Roxas and his pro-Americanism.pdf

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Published by Bert M Drona
Our first post-war president was Manuel A. Roxas who came from the landed oligarchy and was backed by the rich Spanish and Chinese mestizo socioeconomic elites and American businessmen. Roxas was a confirmed collaborator (joined the Japanese puppet government), but was "..later exonerated and whitewashed by powerful American interests." (H. J. Abaya, see bottom)
Our first post-war president was Manuel A. Roxas who came from the landed oligarchy and was backed by the rich Spanish and Chinese mestizo socioeconomic elites and American businessmen. Roxas was a confirmed collaborator (joined the Japanese puppet government), but was "..later exonerated and whitewashed by powerful American interests." (H. J. Abaya, see bottom)

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Published by: Bert M Drona on Nov 06, 2013
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05/09/2014

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Saturday, October 19, 2013
President Manuel A. Roxas and his Pro-Americanism(1946 to 1948)
" Fear history, for it respects no secrets" - Gregoria de Jesus
 
 
(widow of Andres Bonifacio)“Salus populi suprema lex esto
 
("The welfare of the people shall be the supreme law.") - Cicero
***************************************** 
Notes: Colored, underlined words are HTML links. Click on them to see the linked posts/articles. Forwarding this and other posts to relatives and friends,
especially those in the homeland 
, is greatly appreciated). To share, use all social media tools: email, blog, Google+, Tumblr,Twitter,Facebook, etc. THANKS!! 
****************************************
HI All,In our search for understanding of the perennial predicament in our homeland, a visit to the history of how our past presidents led or, more aptly, ruled provides us some historical insights; that is, allow us to discern patterns and trends that we of subsequent generations can identify as permeating our present so-called national leadership.
I.P. Soliongco
 wrote a series of articles about our post-WW2 presidents from the years 1946 to 1971, the year of his death. His articles though dated are so alive and resonate in the thinking Filipino mind, given that his critical analysis and observations are so relevant, 50+ years ago today. In his introduction to Soliongco's articles about our post-WW2 presidents (from 1946 to 1971), one of our great nationalist, the late Prof. Constantino stated :
" Soliongco's writings on post-war Philippine presidents are particularly enlightening because he always viewed them from the overall perspective of RP-US relations..." 
In below article, I. P. Soliongco provides us with his brief narrative/critical analysis of the Roxas presidency,1946-1948.
 (Other presidents to be posted later.)
 
Our first post-war president was
Manuel A. Roxas
 who came from the landed oligarchyand was backed by the rich Spanish and Chinese mestizo socioeconomic elites and  American businessmen. Roxas was a confirmed collaborator (joined the Japanese puppet government), but was
"..later exonerated and whitewashed by powerful American
 
interests."
(H. J. Abaya,
see bottom
 )
NOTE:
“ Salus populi suprema lex esto
 
or
"The welfare of the people shall be the supreme law."
Over a millennium apart, both Cicero of the Roman Republic and John Locke of Great Britain recognized the
sovereignty of the people
 and the latter’s right of rebellion or
 
revolution against a government that works against the “common good
 
.” Fast forward today,
no post-WW2 Philippine president has so far acted according to that supreme law
 
. What should we native Filipinos do then? Should we:
1.
do nothing --bury our heads in the sand and maintain the attitude and behavior of selfish individualism "kanya-kanya" and "tough luck" dismissal of those less fortunate as usual? or 
2.
inform ourselves about/to appreciate more deeply the roots of our perennial perdition and then decide what to do for the sake of the "common good."- Bert
***********************
ON PRESIDENTS , ET AL
ROXAS AND HIS PRO-AMERICANISM
Written by Indalecio P. Soliongco, Editorial Writer/columnist, Manila ChronicleEdited by Prof. Renato Constantino
President Garcia discharged his obligation to honor the memory of President Roxas, a man who enjoyed vast popularity during his incumbency, by sending a simple wreath to his tomb. The press, with rare unanimity, paid its tribute to the man by recording in some obscure corner in its inside pages the fact that yesterday, January 1, was his birthday.Beyond this routine gestures of courtesy there was nothing - no parades, no speeches, no programs. For the tragic truth is ,
the observance of the natal day of President Roxas has degenerated from the national event that it was in 1949 to the strictly family affair that it is today
.
There are indications that President Magsaysay is headed to an identical
 
obscurity
. Even such touching acts of the United States as issuing commemorative stamps and establishing her Asian version of the Nobel Foundation seem to be so inadequate against the clouds which are fast dimming the luster of the Magsaysay name.
MAR and RM
Now, there is something in common between President Roxas and President Magsaysay, something which makes them brothers in spirit, so to speak.
They were both unabashed in their pro-Americanism.
 In justice to them, however, let it be properly recorded that they felt had to be so for purely personal reasons.President Roxas, for instance, was liberated by General Douglas MAcArthur's  Americans and cleansed of the
taint of collaboration
. This proved to be a crucial event in Mr. Roxas’ career, for, later on, he was able to capture the presidency. To his dying day he was grateful to his benefactors.President Magsaysay, on his part, was even proud that American officials in the Philippines openly took up his cause. He never was able to get over the fact that he was singled out by the Americans as their candidate. It was probably for this and more that he never could be convinced that it was the Filipinos and not the Americans who were responsible for his election.
His last speech on earth, like the last speech on earth by President Roxas, was a reaffirmation of his eternal gratitude to the Americans.
But both President Roxas and president Magsaysay could not resist the temptation of expressing their gratitude officially. Thus
President Roxas engineered the acceptance of the
Parity Amendment to the Philippine Constitution
and agreed to every onerous detail of the
 Military and Bases Agreements with the United States. Thus too, President Magsaysay took infinite care not to pursue policies and render  judgment which would displease the Americans.Current events, however, show that the extremely pro-American economic and foreign policies of the two men have not been beneficial to the Filipinos. Indeed,
 the Filipinos are realizing now, when it is a little bit late in the day, that they have paid dearly for the so-called
 “special relations” between the Philippines and the United States. In these circumstances they can not be expected to remember for long the men who did their best to perpetuate those
 “special relations.” 
The advocacy of “special relations” may have its political uses, but it is a deterrent to the attainment of independence. And since the Filipinos are supposed to be a sovereign people,
 the heroes and presidents
 
they will ultimately and respectfully remember

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