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1963: The Year of the Revolution

1963: The Year of the Revolution

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Published by DeyStreet
1963: The Year of the Revolution (http://www.harpercollinsapps.com/book/9780062120441/1963-The-Year-of-the-Revolution-by-Ariel-Leve-and-Robin-Morgan/ ) is the first book to recount the kinetic story of the liberation of youth through music, fashion, and the arts—and in the voices of those who changed the world so radically, from Keith Richards to Eric Clapton, Mary Quant to Vidal Sassoon, Graham Nash to Peter Frampton, Alan Parker to Gay Talese, Stevie Nicks to Norma Kamali, and many more. It is an oral history that records, documentary-style, the incredible roller-coaster ride of that year, in which a group of otherwise obscure teenagers would become global superstars. It serves not only as a fast-paced, historical eyewitness account but as an inspiration to anyone in search of a passion, an identity, and a dream.
1963: The Year of the Revolution (http://www.harpercollinsapps.com/book/9780062120441/1963-The-Year-of-the-Revolution-by-Ariel-Leve-and-Robin-Morgan/ ) is the first book to recount the kinetic story of the liberation of youth through music, fashion, and the arts—and in the voices of those who changed the world so radically, from Keith Richards to Eric Clapton, Mary Quant to Vidal Sassoon, Graham Nash to Peter Frampton, Alan Parker to Gay Talese, Stevie Nicks to Norma Kamali, and many more. It is an oral history that records, documentary-style, the incredible roller-coaster ride of that year, in which a group of otherwise obscure teenagers would become global superstars. It serves not only as a fast-paced, historical eyewitness account but as an inspiration to anyone in search of a passion, an identity, and a dream.

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Published by: DeyStreet on Nov 07, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/13/2013

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INTRODUCTION
It remains a unique and prophetic coincidence— one that has gone unnoticed for more than fifty years. On January 13, 1963, in Bir-mingham, England, an attractive young boy band recorded its first appearance on British national television, dazzling viewers with an exuberant tune called “Please Please Me.” That same night, viewers found a more cerebral experience on the BBC, then the only other TV channel in Britain, when an unknown, tousle- haired American mu-sician made
his
 broadcast debut by intoning a hymn entitled “Blowinin the Wind.”Neither the Beatles nor Bob Dylan could have known it, but within the year their voices would enthrall millions of ears around the world. The Beatles would become the poster boys for a revolution, and Dylan  would become its prophet.
 
 x 
 INTRODUCTION
In 1963, the world was undergoing extraordinary social upheaval triggered by postwar prosperity and adolescent defiance; the tectonic plates of class, money, and power were colliding, and socioreligious rules were crumbling.It was the year that the Cold War protagonists sought a truce, the race into space shifted up a gear, feminists and civil rights ac-tivists flexed their political muscles, a bimbo/spy scandal engulfed the British government, and President John F. Kennedy’s assassina-tion stunned the world. But as the front pages of history were being printed, there was one scoop slipping by virtually unnoticed: the  world was witnessing a youthquake.In January 1963, teenagers were picking up musical instruments, cameras, paintbrushes, pens, and scissors to challenge conformity.  A band calling itself the Rolling Stones auditioned a new bass guitar-ist and drummer. Eric Clapton, Stevie Nicks, David Bowie, and Elton John were picking at strings and fiddling with keys. On the West Coast, a band aptly named the Beach Boys gained notoriety on Los  Angeles radio stations, while in Detroit a girl group changed its name to the Supremes and reached toward the limelight.In London, an anarchic Irishman pursued a piratical approach to breaking the music industry’s middle- of- the- road stranglehold on the airwaves; after buying a fishing trawler, he anchored it in in-ternational waters so he could broadcast the kind of music he liked  without license or interference. A designer called Mary Quant cut six inches— or more— off a hem, and an ambitious hairdresser named  Vidal Sassoon adapted the principles of architecture to a look that complemented her miniskirted models.In just one year, the landscape of our lives, loves, and looks changed forever. Musicians, fashion designers, writers, journalists, and artists challenged the established order, forcing cultural elders not only to share political and commercial power with a new elite but to seek its endorsement as well. The social, cultural, political, and technological blueprint for a new world was being drawn and updated

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