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THE BLESSEDNESS OF PARDON.pdf

THE BLESSEDNESS OF PARDON.pdf

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
By REV. A. H. TUTTLE, D. D.



"Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven,
• whose sin is covered. Blessed is the man unto
whom the Lord imputeth not iniquity/' — Psa.
xxxii, I, 2.
By REV. A. H. TUTTLE, D. D.



"Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven,
• whose sin is covered. Blessed is the man unto
whom the Lord imputeth not iniquity/' — Psa.
xxxii, I, 2.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Nov 07, 2013
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THE BLESSEDNESS OF PARDON.By REV. A. H. TUTTLE, D. D."Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven,• whose sin is covered. Blessed is the man untowhom the Lord imputeth not iniquity/' — Psa.xxxii, I, 2.This is one of the most joyful strains from theHebrew Psalter. Its music is that of silver bellsringing merrily into the noise of clapping hands andthe pattering feet of holy dance.There is some doubt whether the word blessedis an adjective or a noun; but it is certainly pluralin its form, and is rendered by many of our bestcommentators "O the happinesses !" The psalm be-gins with this joyful shout twice repeated, "O thehappinesses !" "O the happinesses !" And this ex-ultant strain continues throughout the entire sang,closing with the ecstatic cry, "Be glad in the Lord,and rejoice, ye righteous: and shout for joy, all yethat are upright in heart." And yet the psalmstands in immediate connection with one of the sad-72The Blessedness of Pardox. 73dest (the fifty-first), which is the groaning of asoul in the anguish of guilt. Both are historicallyconnected with the same event — David's awful sin.One is the song of penitence; the other is the songof pardon.
 
The psalm, however, is not simply the outburstof David's joy, as though he were alone and singularin it, but was sung purposely for those who, like thesinning king, have suffered the ache of tormentingguilt. Notice the title, Maschil. It means instruc-tion. David put his experience in immortal verseexpressly to teach fallen men that they need notdespair. By the grace of pardon, joy will comeagain to the sin-burdened soul. And that is theservice that this psalm has rendered in history.Luther pronounced it one of the four most pre-cious in the entire book, "Because," said he, "itteaches that pardon of sin comes without the law, tothe man who believes." The dying St. Augustinehad it written on the wall of the room where he lay,that it might be constantly before his eyes. Paul,in writing to the Jewish Christians in Rome, en-forces the doctrine of justification by faith, by quot-ing these verses. The Jew seeking pardon on thegreat day of atonement, chanted this psalm.Is there any one who knows the bitterness of a74 The Living Word.great sin, and fears that he can never be perfectlyhappy again, let him be instructed. There is agreat joy possible for even him. The silver bellsmay make melody in his heart. "O the happi-nesses !"I. The: blessedness of pardon is threefold, assuggested by the triple expression of the text,"Whose transgression is forgiven;" "Whose sinis covered;" "To whom the Lord imputeth notiniquity.Here are three different terms to express three
 
different aspects or consequences of our wrong, — transgression, or antagonism to God, by whichwe are alienated from him; sin, or a deflectionfrom the true line of our life, and so a spoilingof our history; iniquity, or guilt, the effect of ourwrong on our own spirit, affecting memory, con-science, and all our sensibilities. Pardon recovers uson all these sides. It restores us to God's favor. Itrights the course of our broken lives. It lifts fromthe spirit the burden of its intolerable load. Let uslook at this threefold happiness in particular.i. It restores us to God's favor. Sin alienatesthe soul and God. This is a statement so oftenmade from the pulpit as to invite the charge of aThe: Blessedness cf Pardon. 75platitude. But it is not spoken from the sacreddesk alone. It is proclaimed with ominous empha-sis in the sinner's own breast. One can not at thesame time live in sin and be at peace with God. Thesinner dislikes God ; he purposely turns his thoughtsaway from him, and tries to forget him. Or he isafraid of him, and, like the sinner of Eden, triesto hide from him. Or he affects to despise him.He blasphemes his holy name. He questions his ex-istence, and believes hard things of him. In short,he is God's enemy. ''You were sometime alienatedand enemies in your mind by wicked works." (Col.i, 21.)But let not the sinner deceive himself with thebelief that the enmity is all on his side. There isa common sentiment existing among us whichgreatly weakens the gravity of the consequences of our sin; which is, that while it makes us hostile toGod, it leaves him our Friend. Xot so does the

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