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Leadership Success, Part 3 - Responsibilities

Leadership Success, Part 3 - Responsibilities

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Published by Carl Sawatzky
Leadership Success: Behaviors, Competencies and Responsibilities That Produce Positive Results, Part 3 – Responsibilities
The third and final installment of the Leadership Success trilogy concludes with an overview of the responsibilities managers need to embrace as part of the BCR (Behaviors, Competencies and Responsibilities) approach to successful leadership. Included are chapters on coaching, aligning visions and goals, and managing change.
Leadership Success: Behaviors, Competencies and Responsibilities That Produce Positive Results, Part 3 – Responsibilities
The third and final installment of the Leadership Success trilogy concludes with an overview of the responsibilities managers need to embrace as part of the BCR (Behaviors, Competencies and Responsibilities) approach to successful leadership. Included are chapters on coaching, aligning visions and goals, and managing change.

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Published by: Carl Sawatzky on Aug 07, 2009
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04/30/2012

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Leadership Success:
 
Behaviors, Competencies and ResponsibilitiesThat Produce Positive Results
Part 3 – Responsibilities
 
James L. HanerManaging PartnerUltimate Business Resources Consulting
 
1-800-843-8733www.learningtree.ca
©2008 Learning Tree International. All Rights Reserved.
 
Introduction
.............................................
1Responsibilities
.........................................
2Providing Coaching
..............................
2Aligning Vision and Goals
....................
2Managing Change
................................
3Summary
..................................................
3References, Books and Web Sites
 .............
4About Learning Tree International
...........
5About the Author
.....................................
5
Introduction
“The Buck Stops Here.”  —
Former U.S. President Harry S. Truman
One o the great strengths that defnes a successul leaderis the ability to build teams that can deliver products andservices aster, better and more cost-eectively. Developing this strength, however, requires a successul balance o several actors. In 2005, my colleague David Williams andI designed and developed what we termed the Behaviors,Competencies and Responsibilities (BCR) approach toleadership to identiy these very actors. As you can seerom the diagram below, when the three critical elementso behaviors, competencies, and responsibilities cometogether—as they do in the center purple area—you geteective, successul, productive, powerul, thoughtul,prudent, strong and wise leadership results.I’ll be exploring each o these aspects individually as they relate to successul team leadership in three successive White Papers. Part 1 ocused on
Behaviors
 , and in Part 2 Iaddressed
Competencies
. In Part 3, we examine the fnalaspect—
Responsibilities
.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
Leadership Success: Responsibilities
LEARNING TREE INTERNATIONAL
 
White Paper
1-800-843-8733
 
www.learningtree.ca
©2008 Learning Tree International. All Rights Reserved.
Behaviors CompetenciesResponsibilities
 
Responsibilities
 
In essence, responsibilities are what leaders consider aretheir duties, obligations and work. Executing the ollowing inspirational responsibilities is a hallmark o eectiveleadership: providing coaching, aligning visions and goals,and managing change.
Providing Coaching
Coaching represents a critical attribute o leadership. A leader who coaches helps others advance their skills while building a stronger team and providing career guidance. According to Emotional Intelligence (EI) guru Daniel Goleman, coaching in leadership is best summed up by the phrase “try this.”
1
 Leaders use coaching to help employees identiy their strengthsand weaknesses so that they, in turn, can exploit their positiveaspects and overcome their limitations. Also, team members’
individual career aspirations and personal goals are incorporated
into the project mix, so that team and individual goals are seen as
being connected to—and congruent with—the larger eort.Keep in mind coaching in leadership is not being a “handholder.” It is about giving plenty o eedback on perormance,delegating eectively and giving out challenging assignments.Leaders who use coaching most eectively have the ability to send these messages to their teams:
• I believe in your abilities• I’m willing to invest my time in you• In exchange for this trust and investment, I expectyou to do your best
Goleman’s research also ound that coaching was the leastcommon inspirational responsibility ound in the workplace,mostly because the majority o leaders don’t see themselvesas having the time. On the other hand, although it takestime and patience, it’s a short-term investment that yieldsabove-average team perormance in the long term.To summarize, coaching leaders are genuinely interested inhelping the team succeed. They do this by ocusing on thedevelopment o others, along with aligning team and individualgoals, while using empathy and Emotional Intelligence.
Aligning Vision and Goals 
In Lewis Carroll’s
 Alice in Wonderland
 , Alice asks the CheshireCat, “ Please, could you tell me which way I should go?” “Thatdepends on where you want to go,” the Cheshire Cat replies.“I don’t really care,” says Alice, “as long as I get somewhere.”To which the Cheshire Cat responds, “Well, it doesn’t matterthen, does it?”Unlike Alice, leaders
do
need to know where they’re going and need to establish a vision. That vision should ocus on:
• Determining goals
(Where are we going?)
• Developing strategies to reach them
 (How will we get there?)
• Developing and conducting evaluations to identifythe point when the goals have been reached
 (How will we know when we get there?) A vision is more than a orecast. It shows how all the parts o a project ft together and relate to one another. By thinking strategically and systematically, leaders ensure that there areclear team goals that will oster excitement and commitment within the team.In act, ollowers expect leaders to set the stage. Says Peter F.Drucker, “The oundation o eective leadership is thinking through the organization’s mission, defning it and establishing it, clearly and visibly. The leader sets the goals, sets the priorities,and sets and maintains the standards. What distinguishesthe leader rom the misleader is his goals. Whether thecompromise he makes with the constraints o reality—whichmay involve political, economic, and fnancial peopleproblems—is compatible with his mission and goals, orleads away rom them, determines whether he is an eectiveleader. And whether he holds ast to a ew basic standards(exempliying them in his own conduct), or whetherstandards or him are what he can get away with, determines whether the leader has ollowers or hypocritical time-servers.”
2
2
1-800-843-8733
www.learningtree.ca
 
LEARNING TREE INTERNATIONAL
 
White Paper
©2008 Learning Tree International. All Rights Reserved.
Leadership Success: Responsibilities

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