Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
12Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Thayer US Counter-Terrorism and Southeast Asia

Thayer US Counter-Terrorism and Southeast Asia

Ratings: (0)|Views: 693|Likes:
Published by Carlyle Alan Thayer
Carlyle A. Thayer, “Internal Conflict and Terrorism in Southeast Asia: Regional Responses and U.S. Leadership,” Paper to panel on Internal Conflict and Terrorism in Southeast Asia: Assessing the Effectiveness of Regional Responses and U.S. Leadership, 46th International Studies Association Annual Convention, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.A., March 1-5, 2005.
Carlyle A. Thayer, “Internal Conflict and Terrorism in Southeast Asia: Regional Responses and U.S. Leadership,” Paper to panel on Internal Conflict and Terrorism in Southeast Asia: Assessing the Effectiveness of Regional Responses and U.S. Leadership, 46th International Studies Association Annual Convention, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.A., March 1-5, 2005.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Carlyle Alan Thayer on Aug 08, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/11/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Internal Conflict and Terrorism in Southeast Asia:Regional Responses and U.S. LeadershipCarlyle A. Thayer
*
[Paper to panel on Internal Conflict and Terrorism in Southeast Asia: Assessing the Effectiveness of Regional Responses and U.S. Leadership, 46
th
International Studies Association Annual Convention, HiltonHawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.A., March 1-5, 2005]
Abstract
In the aftermath of terrorist bombings on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001,U.S. President George Bush called for a global war on terrorism. The United Nations Security Councilquickly rallied behind the U.S. and passed a resolution binding the UN’s members to prevent such actsfrom occurring again. In Southeast Asia, political leaders uniformly condemned the terrorist attacks on theUnited States and offered varying measures of support. This paper provides an overview of regionalresponses to the emergence of internationally networked terrorism and U.S. efforts to provide leadership inthe war on terrorism. It concludes by offering an assessment of successes and shortcomings of the variousapproaches adopted along three dimensions: preferences, capacity and leadership.
Introduction
In the aftermath of terrorist attacks on the United States on 11
th
September 2001(hereafter (9-11), the United Nations Security Council, acting under the provisions of Chapter VII of its Charter, adopted Resolution 1373 on September 28, 2001. Thisresolution reaffirmed the Security Council’s unequivocal condemnation of the 9-11terrorist attacks and
“1.
 Decides
that all States shall:(a) Prevent and suppress the financing of terrorist acts;(b) Criminalize the willful provision or collection, by any means, directly or indirectly, of fundsby their nationals or in their territories with the intention that the funds should be used, or in the knowledgethat they are to be used, in order to carry out terrorist acts;(c) Freeze without delay funds and other financial assets or economic resources of persons whocommit, or attempt to commit, terrorist acts or participate in or facilitate the commission of terrorist acts; of entities owned or controlled directly or indirectly by such persons; and of persons and entities acting onbehalf of, or at the direction of such persons and entities, including funds derived or generated fromproperty owned or controlled directly or indirectly by such persons and associated persons and entities;(d) Prohibit their nationals or any persons and entities within their territories from making anyfunds, financial assets or economic resources or financial or other related services available, directly orindirectly, for the benefit of persons who commit or attempt to commit or facilitate or participate in thecommission of terrorist acts, of entities owned or controlled, directly or indirectly, by such persons and of persons and entities acting on behalf of or at the direction of such persons;2.
 Decides also
that all States shall:(a) Refrain from providing any form of support, active or passive, to entities or persons involvedin terrorist acts, including by suppressing recruitment of members of terrorist groups and eliminating thesupply of weapons to terrorists;
*
C. V. Starr Distinguished Visiting Professor, Southeast Asia Program, School of Advanced InternationalStudies, Johns Hopkins University, Washington, D.C. on leave as Director, UNSW Defence StudiesForum, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University College, The University of New SouthWales at the Australian Defence Force Academy in Canberra.
 
 2
(b) Take the necessary steps to prevent the commission of terrorist acts, including by provision of early warning to other States by exchange of information;(c) Deny safe haven to those who finance, plan, support, or commit terrorist acts, or provide safehavens;(d) Prevent those who finance, plan, facilitate or commit terrorist acts from using their respectiveterritories for those purposes against other States or their citizens;(e) Ensure that any person who participates in the financing, planning, preparation or perpetrationof terrorist acts or in supporting terrorist acts is brought to justice and ensure that, in addition to any othermeasures against them, such terrorist acts are established as serious criminal offences in domestic laws andregulations and that the punishment duly reflects the seriousness of such terrorist acts;(f) Afford one another the greatest measure of assistance in connection with criminalinvestigations or criminal proceedings relating to the financing or support of terrorist acts, includingassistance in obtaining evidence in their possession necessary for the proceedings;(g) Prevent the movement of terrorists or terrorist groups by effective border controls and controlson issuance of identity papers and travel documents, and through measures for preventing counterfeiting,forgery or fraudulent use of identity papers and travel documents.”
Resolution 1373 also called upon all members of the United Nations to:
“(a) Find ways of intensifying and accelerating the exchange of operational information,especially regarding actions or movements of terrorist persons or networks; forged or falsified traveldocuments; traffic in arms, explosives or sensitive materials; use of communications technologies byterrorist groups; and the threat posed by the possession of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist groups;(b) Exchange information in accordance with international and domestic law and cooperate onadministrative and judicial matters to prevent the commission of terrorist acts;(c) Cooperate, particularly through bilateral and multilateral arrangements and agreements, toprevent and suppress terrorist attacks and take action against perpetrators of such acts;(d) Become parties as soon as possible to the relevant international conventions and protocolsrelating to terrorism, including the International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism of 9 December 1999;(e) Increase cooperation and fully implement the relevant international conventions and protocolsrelating to terrorism and Security Council resolutions 1269 (1999) and 1368 (2001);(f) Take appropriate measures in conformity with the relevant provisions of national andinternational law, including international standards of human rights, before granting refugee status, for thepurpose of ensuring that the asylum seeker has not planned, facilitated or participated in the commission of terrorist acts;(g) Ensure, in conformity with international law, that refugee status is not abused by theperpetrators, organizers or facilitators of terrorist acts, and that claims of political motivation are notrecognized as grounds for refusing requests for the extradition of alleged terrorists.”
In addition to the International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism (1999), the “relevant international conventions and protocols relating toterrorism” include (see Appendix A):
 
Convention on Offences and Certain Other Acts Committed On Board Aircraft(Tokyo Convention, 1963)
 
Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Seizure of Aircraft (HagueConvention, 1970)
 
Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Civil
 
 3Aviation (Montreal Convention, 1971)
 
Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Crimes Against InternationallyProtected Persons (1973)
 
International Convention Against the Taking of Hostages (Hostages Convention,1979)
 
Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (Nuclear MaterialsConvention, 1980)
 
Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts of Violence at Airports ServingInternational Civil Aviation, supplementary to the Convention for the Suppressionof Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Civil Aviation (1988)
 
Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of MaritimeNavigation, (1988)
 
Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of FixedPlatforms Located on the Continental Shelf (1988)
 
Convention on the Marking of Plastic Explosives for the Purpose of Detection(1991) and the
 
International Convention for the Suppression of Terrorist Bombing (1997)Finally, Resolution 1373 also established a Counter-Terrorism Committee, made up of allfifteen members of the Security Council, to monitor the implementation of this resolutionby all members of the United Nations including ten Southeast Asian states grouped in theAssociation of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).The following sections will review Southeast Asian responses to the events of 9-11 andevaluate U.S. leadership in the global war on terrorism in a regional context.
Regional Responses
The events of 9-11
. In response to the events of 9-11, the states of Southeast Asia almostuniformly condemned the terrorist attacks on the United States, offered their sympathy tothe victims, and pledged varying degrees of support to the U.S. The Lao People’sDemocratic Republic, for example, prided itself on being one of the first to sendPresident Bush a message of sympathy. Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir took theunusual step of personally signing the condolence book at the U.S. Embassy in KualaLumpur. President Megawati Sukarnoputri visited Washington, D.C. shortly after 9-11.In a joint statement issued with President Bush on September 19
th
, she condemned theterrorist attacks and pledged to strengthen Indonesia’s cooperation in combatinginternational terrorism. Singapore’s Prime Minister Goh Tok Chong stated that Singapore“stands with the United States” in the fight against terrorism, while his Thai counterpart,Taksin Shinawatra, made a more equivocal statement of support. President GloriaMacapagal-Arroyo offered specific concrete assistance. She stated that the Philippineswould not only permit the use of its air space and military facilities for U.S. forcestransiting the area but would be prepared to deploy support and medical personnel andcombat forces – if requested by the United Nations.

Activity (12)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Atul Bhattarai liked this
rdesga liked this
zaimani liked this
zaimani liked this
dsjmie2000 liked this
rdesga liked this
my_heaven198502 liked this
rioadhitomo liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->