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THE SEA OF CARE AND THE HARBOUR OF TRUST.pdf

THE SEA OF CARE AND THE HARBOUR OF TRUST.pdf

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Published by glennpease
BY SAMUEL COX



A SERMON TO THE YOUNG.



Neither be ye of doubtful mind" — Luke
xii. 29.
BY SAMUEL COX



A SERMON TO THE YOUNG.



Neither be ye of doubtful mind" — Luke
xii. 29.

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Published by: glennpease on Nov 09, 2013
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THE SEA OF CARE AND THE HARBOUR OF TRUST.BY SAMUEL COXA SERMON TO THE YOUNG.Neither be ye of doubtful mind" — Lukexii. 29.IF I were to tell you that thereis a beautiful parable in thewords I have just read, I daresay you would be puzzled tomake out what I meant. Butare you quite sure that youknow what a parable is ? The young do notfind it easy, I am not sure that we any of usfind it easy, to define even the words with whichwe are most familiar. Only the other day Iheard of a boy who, on being asked by histeacher, " And what is faith ? " boldly replied,*' Faith is believing tilings that lue knoiu arenot true " — which was by no means a satis-factory definition of a word so short and sofamiliar as '' faith." And " parable," like*' faith," is a word which has puzzled wiserheads than yours. Even the scholars whotranslated the New Testament from Greek intoEnglish did not know sometimes whether totranslate the Greek word they commonlyrendered parable by the word " parable," orthe word "proverb." And, indeed, there is aclose connection between these two words ; andthe short, pithy, picturesque saying which we
 
call " a proverb " easily grows into a parable.For example, if an ancient man of God hadsaid — and both Job and Solomon did say some-thing very like it — " Wisdom is a pearl moreprecious than much fine gold," that would havebeen a proverb. But mark how easily thisproverb grows into a parable on the lips of the Lord Jesus when, speaking of the highestwisdom and the highest good. He says, '* Thekingdom of heaven is like unto a merchantmanseeking goodly pearls, who, when he had foundAND THE HARBOUR OF TRUST. 145one pearl of great price, went and sold all thathe had and bought it."On the whole, perhaps, we may define aproverb as a compressed parable, and a parableas an expanded proverb ; or we may say that aproverb is a brief, weighty, and picturesquesentence into which much thought and ex-perience have been crushed ; and that a parableis that same sentence, or that same thought,.drawn out, dramatized, and made into a tale.And if we do thus define them, we may find inmy text both a proverb and a parable.Even in its present form, " Be not of a doubt-ful mind," or " Be not of a divided and agitatedmind," the phrase has some touch of the weightand sententiousness which mark a proverb.What it lacks is the picturesqueness, the brightand striking comparison, which we look for inour best proverbs. And this is soon supplied^as soon as we look at the Greek instead of theEnglish Testam.ent. For then we see that mytext consists of three words instead of six ; a
 
short word (/cal) which means " and',' a stillshorter word (yL6r;) which means " ;/^/," and along verb or word (fMerecopi^eo-Oe) which means30 much that I dare say you will wonder howany one word can carry it all. It means " ta10146 THE SEA OF CAREtoss about on the open sea,'' yes, and to toss abouton the open sea as opposed to riding in a port,or harbour, which is at once accessible and safe.So that, taken altogether, these three words — and two of them such short words too I — mean :''Do not toss about on the open dangerous seaivJien you may ride safely in a large and sJielteredhaven!' And that, surely, is as bright andpicturesque a proverb as any man, or child, canreasonably desire.We have found our proverb, then, and a verybeautiful proverb. Now let us look for ourparable. To arrive at this, we must glance atthe connection in which my text stands, at thediscourse of which it forms a part. We mustlet the main theme of this discourse run intoour proverb, and fill up that which is still want-ing in it, that which will define or specify " thesea" and "the harbour" of which the proverbspeaks.As, then, our Lord passed through one of thetowns of Galilee, He took occasion to repeat thewarning against that care for to-morrow, thatanxiety for the future, by which men often unfitthemselves for the duties of to-day, and rob thepresent hour of its peace and joy. Once moreHe rebuked the fi'ctting cares, the baseless fears,

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