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Story of the Vanishing Steeds (1908)

Story of the Vanishing Steeds (1908)

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Published by draculavanhelsing
The World's News 1908 (Oct 3)
The World's News 1908 (Oct 3)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on Nov 09, 2013
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05/16/2014

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The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 3 October 1908, page 3National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133967235
Mysteriesof
the
AustralianBush.
'the'
stoby*&f
thevanishingSTEEDS.
(BY
FRANK
I
RECORDEDin TheWorld'sNews ofthe19th
the
tales
of
theTerrifiedHorsesinthenorthern
bushlands
ofNewSouth
Wales.
Beyond
thatState,furthernorth
still,is
a
vastexpanseoftheAustralian
bush,
from
which
come
tales
of
more
intensemystery,andwhich
bring
terrortothe
hearts
of
listenersround
campflres
who
havehad
little
experience
and
little
knowledge
oftheweirdeventsof
these
silentexpanses.Years
ago,
beforethesteelrailsfarthernorth
still,
andbe
fore
settlementhad
re
claimedthewilderness,
the
pastoralkings
heldsway.These
were
wild
days—long
beforethe
wire
fenceslockedtheimmense
run-lands,whenonlylonelyshepherds
tendedtheirflocks
long
milesfromcivilisation.
Truly,
it
was
God's
End.
Strange
were
the
occurrences
ofthesetimes.
Fromvarious
sinisterconditions
came
talesofhaunted
dwellings
and
lonely
riverbends,1
could
set
downmanyinstancesofthe
myste
riousappearanceand
hap
penings
oftheseremoteparts,but
just
herepro
poseto
relatethe
story
ofthefour
vanishing
steeds.There
is
no
occasionto
record
the
names
ofthose
taking
partin
them,
nor
yetthe
precise
location.There
is
no
exaggetion.There
is
no
exaggeration,but
simply
the
experiences
ofhumble
workingpeople
whoseword
is
as
good
as
theaffluent,andthe
names
of
the
participators
are
promptly
available
to
anyreader
desiring
them.
This
is
the
tale
ofthe
vanishing
steedsof
Bog
ree
Bend.
(It
now
bears
amore
exalted
name.)
TheBend
wasa
wild
part
of
thecountry,where
on
moonlightnights
gangsof
mounted
menwere
wontto
rendezvous
to
mustertheherds
o
f
 
thesetimes
J.
H
and
hiswiferesidedat
)
the
Bend,
and
one
night
four
men
had
toturn
1
uptomusterthecattle
thereabouts.Inthe
J
housethis
night
were
theheadstockman.H
,
j
hiswife,
andthree
aboriginal
women
whohad
\
come
downfrom
their
camp
casually
toyarn
(
away
the
night
tillitwas
time
to
saddleupand
(
scour
the
country.
<
Atabout9
o'clockthe
steady
hoof-beatsof
{
the
horses,
andthechink-chinkofthebridle-
<
bits,
came
clearly
on
the
night
air
towardsthehouse
fromthe
road
downthe
creek—the
direc-
)
tionfromwhichthe
men
had
to
come.
Nearer
)
and
nearer
they
came,the
hoof-beats
growing
louder,
and,just
as
theyapparently
hadreached
<
thehorse-rail
totieup,
immediately
in
frontof
(
the
house,
H——
jumped
fromhis
stool,and
.
opened
thedoor,
saying
lazily,
 Well,you've
Lome
at
last. Theblack
gins
andhiswifeall
^
l^ned
up
behind
him.
j
There
wereno
horses
or
riders
1
They
had
vanished
in
the
night
inthe
fraction
)
of
a
second,
making
no
sound
}
There
wasno
mistake
about,thecireuih-
j
Btance;
it
was
absolutelyimpossible
for
the
:
riders
toturnroundand
move
away
without
;
beingheard,
andinany
case
therehad
not
beentime
to
do
so.
The
party
inthehouse
(
could
only
stareateachotherinblank
dismay
'
and
silence—then
grope
their
wayto
a
seat.Thefour
men
turnedup
some
quarter
of
an
hourlater,and
were
astounded
at
the
yarn
Of
the
headstockmanandtherestofthehouseparty.In
speaking
ofthe
occurrenceinafter
times,
H-would
sayit
wouldhe
possible
for
one
aloneofthe
party
to
imagine
that
they
heard
horses
come
upto
thehouse,
butthewhole
fiveof
themheardthe
same—and
thegins,be
it
particularlynoted,
areas
sharp
in
hearing
m
their
own
native
bush
as
sewer-rats,and
can
hear
immense
distances—probably
hearin
cases
where
a
white
man
could
not.Allmade
no
mistake.
They
haddistinctlyheard
the
tramp,
tramp
of
a
numberofhorses
coming
downthe
track,rightUp
to
thedoorofthehut.The
country
roundthe
hut
was,
of
course,
cleared,and
it
stoodalonesomewhere
near
the
centre
oftheclearing,and
it
was
brightmoonlight.
Thehorses
(apparently)tramped
up
to
thedoor
of
thehut,and
disappeared—
vanishedinto
space —Concealment
was
impos
 
The
Marchers,
creating
a
Disturbance
at
Canterbury
Cathedral.
sible.Thestockmen
promptlytold
tie
party
1
they
mustharebeen
dreaming,
and
imagined
1
they
themselves
were
coming
up
the
track.It
 
couldnotbeanyother
party,
there
being
no
i
othermounted
men
within
many
miles.
How
i
ever,the
circumstances
must
remain
a
mys
i
tery.
i
Onthefour
men
giving
their
assurance
they
i
had
only
once
visitedthehut,the
gins
com
i
menced
towailand
moan
pitifully
Cheating
,
their
headsagainstthefloor)with
fearatthis,
manifestation
of
an
utterlyunexplainable
oc

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