Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
IOSDE Statement on Self-Determination, Peace and Conflict, Security and Decolonizing

IOSDE Statement on Self-Determination, Peace and Conflict, Security and Decolonizing

Ratings: (0)|Views: 256|Likes:
November 12, 2013 IOSDE Statement on Self-Determination, Peace and Conflict, Security and Decolonizing
November 12, 2013 IOSDE Statement on Self-Determination, Peace and Conflict, Security and Decolonizing

More info:

Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/17/2013

pdf

text

original

 
International Organization for Self-Determination and Equality (IOSDE)
 
Kopparslagargränd 2 83151 Östersund, Sweden ph: +46 (0) 70 283 4808 info@iosde.org  www.iosde.org
IOSDE: an equal future starts with an equal now
 IOSDE Statement on Self-Determination, Peace and Conflict, Security and Decolonizing  Domestic Abuse and Redefining Aggression
Indigenous and Tribal Peoples experience a violence and aggression against dignity as colonial dependents via discriminatory State and international laws, mechanisms and policies. That violence can be understood as similar to the emotional violence that a domestic dependent experiences when she or he cannot exit an abusive relationship due to dependency, danger and surrounding external societal discrimination: “When indigenous peoples have reacted and tried to assert their rights, they have suffered physical abuse, imprisonment, torture and even death.”
1
 It is imperative that the United Nations (UN) remedies human rights violations occurring to Indigenous and Tribal Peoples by striving to create international peace through formally and institutionally redefining war, conflict and aggression to include not only armed conflict, but also culturally oppressive State policies and international political segregation that are designed to prevent Indigenous and Tribal Peoples from formally decolonizing in a transparent and self-determined, as well as in an internally FPIC (
 free, prior and informed consent 
2
)-based manner. It fact, such steps are the duty of the United Nations as an organization, and at the very foundation of its promotion and protection of human rights according to UN Charter Chapter I (Purposes and Principles) Article 1.
3
 The General Assembly Resolution
 Definition of Aggression
 must be expanded to violence and abuse that occurs not only via force or weapons, but exclusive State sociopolitical structuring and repressed self-determination. In addition to State militarization of Indigenous and Tribal territories so as to be able to utilize Indigenous and Tribal lands for resource extraction and other purposes, identified ‘weapons of mass destruction’ in the
definition of aggression
must include  policies and systems, including segregated, exclusive States-only UN Membership, that result in State-sponsored cultural discrimination, international political and judicial dominance, a denial of the right to say ‘no’ to land-grabbing and foreign visions of political and legal systems and ‘development’ (as well as violations of
 free, prior and informed consent 
), and high crime and suicide rates in Indigenous communities as a result of still-enforced colonialism and denied territorially- and politically-based decolonization and thus self-determination.
1
 United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), Division for Social Policy and Development, Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues “State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples”, New York, 2009, p. 92.
2
 “The element of ‘free’ implies no coercion, intimidation or manipulation; ‘prior’ implies that consent is obtained in advance of the activity associated with the decision being made, and includes the time necessary to allow indigenous peoples to undertake their own decision-making processes; ‘informed’ implies that indigenous peoples have been provided all information relating to the activity and that that information is objective, accurate and presented in a manner and form understandable to indigenous peoples; ‘consent’ implies that indigenous peoples have agreed to the activity that is the subject of the relevant decision, which may also be subject to conditions.”
 from
 EMRIP (UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples), Advice No. 2 (2011): “Indigenous peoples and the right to participate in decision-making”, para. 25.
3
 UN Charter, Chapter I (Purposes and Principles), Article 1. “The Purposes of the United Nations are: 1. To maintain international  peace and security, and to that end: to take effective collective measures for the prevention and removal of threats to the peace, and for the suppression of acts of aggression or other breaches of the peace, and to bring about by peaceful means, and in conformity with the  principles of justice and international law, adjustment or settlement of international disputes or situations which might lead to a breach of the peace.”
 
 "
IOSDE: an equal future starts with an equal now
 Redefining War and Conflict
World conflict, mass destruction and catastrophic consequences are resulting in and from the apartheid and segregation of traditional leadership of Indigenous and Tribal Peoples from World Politics. Under the UN Charter issues concerning international peace and security are a main focus of the Security Council and are to be of consideration to the General Assembly in matters to bring to the attention of the Security Council.
4
 Under Article 39 of the UN Charter the Security Council shall “shall determine the existence of any threat to the peace, breach of the peace, or act of aggression.” Article 11(1) of the Charter considers the maintenance of international peace and security to include, specifically, “disarmament and the regulation of armaments.”
5
 However, the acts that threaten the peace and security of Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in the world context include non-physical aggression- as discussed, these acts of aggression include psychological and emotional violence through discrimination, segregation and restricted traditional culture- and land-based self-determination. The following Articles support that what Indigenous and Tribal Peoples experience acts of aggression as committed by States against Indigenous and Tribal Peoples ushers a need for international attention to and responsibility taken for these acts of aggression by State(s): Article 5(3) of General Assembly Resolution
 Definition of Aggression
: “No territorial acquisition or special advantage resulting from aggression is or shall be recognized as lawful.”
6
 Article 5(2) of General Assembly Resolution
 Definition of Aggression
: “A war of aggression is a crime against international peace. Aggression gives rise to international responsibility.”
7
 
 Human Rights-based politics and the Right to Self-Determination
The UN must decide if it is an organization for the promotion of the political entities known as States, first and foremost, or equality and human rights. Because there are, and always have and will, exist equal traditional and new Indigenous and Tribal political, territorial and legal entities that are not State-model-based but are, in fact, equal to States in their own traditional bases in pre-colonial, pre-State-building, and outside of the scope of
uti possidetis
 (as applied via formation of new States and border-based political entities according to the boundaries of colonial administration), and consisting of a Peoples’ culture, land and history. Acknowledging the inherent abuse and suffering of Indigenous and Tribal Peoples on the ground level and in their daily lives resulting from foreign-imposed governing systems, as well as the human right to peace and dignity, IOSDE supports that Indigenous and Tribal Peoples desiring self-determination and self-governing have the right to do so through methods found in, for example, the
 Declaration on Principles of International Law Concerning Friendly Relations and Co-operation among States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations
, General Assembly (GA) Resolution 2625: “The establishment of a sovereign and independent State, the free association or integration with an independent State or
 
the emergence into any other political status freely determined by a people
 
constitute modes of implementing the right of self-determination by that people.”
8
 
4
 See UN Charter, Articles 11(1), 11(2) and 11(3).
5
 UN Charter, Article 11(1).
6
 United Nations General Assembly, Resolution 3314 (XXIX),
 Definition of Aggression
, 14 December 1974, Annex, Article 5(3).
7
 United Nations General Assembly, Resolution 3314 (XXIX),
 Definition of Aggression
, 14 December 1974, Annex, Article 5(2).
8
 United Nations General Assembly, Resolution 2625,
 Declaration on Principles of International Law Concerning Friendly Relations and Co-operation among States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations
, 1970.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->