Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
THE SINS OF NOT DOING.pdf

THE SINS OF NOT DOING.pdf

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY J. R. MILLER



MANY of the sins of most
good people are sins of not
doing. We need always to
put into our prayer of peni-
tence the confession, "We
have left undone those things
which we ought to have done."
This is true of oui' sins of speech. In one of the
psalms is a resolve that we all need to make —
" I will take heed to my ways, that I sin not
with my tongue.''' Some of us have a great deal
of trouble with our tongues. We say many
harsh words, perhaps bitter words which cut
and sting. We may plead, as our defence of
what we tell, that the things we say of others
are true. But we have no right to blurt out
words that give pain to another, merely be-
cause they may chance to be true.
BY J. R. MILLER



MANY of the sins of most
good people are sins of not
doing. We need always to
put into our prayer of peni-
tence the confession, "We
have left undone those things
which we ought to have done."
This is true of oui' sins of speech. In one of the
psalms is a resolve that we all need to make —
" I will take heed to my ways, that I sin not
with my tongue.''' Some of us have a great deal
of trouble with our tongues. We say many
harsh words, perhaps bitter words which cut
and sting. We may plead, as our defence of
what we tell, that the things we say of others
are true. But we have no right to blurt out
words that give pain to another, merely be-
cause they may chance to be true.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Nov 12, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/12/2013

pdf

text

original

 
THE SIS OF OT DOIGBY J. R. MILLER MAY of the sins of most good people are sins of not doing. We need always to put into our prayer of peni- tence the confession, "We have left undone those things which we ought to have done." This is true of oui' sins of speech. In one of the psalms is a resolve that we all need to make — " I will take heed to my ways, that I sin not with my tongue.''' Some of us have a great deal of trouble with our tongues. We say many harsh words, perhaps bitter words which cut and sting. We may plead, as our defence of what we tell, that the things we say of others are true. But we have no right to blurt out words that give pain to another, merely be- cause they may chance to be true. ** The ill-timed truth we should have kept, — WTio knows how sharp it pierced and stung f " [ 189 ] Ci^e apper CurtentjS There is a great deal of sweet forgiveness in every true heaii; which has been filled with the love of Christ. The Master'^s emphatic lesson, that we should forgive, not seven times, but seventy times seven, has been learned by many
 
patient and gentle believers, for it must be confessed that in too many homes there is al- most measureless need for forgiveness. But is it not most unjust in any one to make such de- mands on love, to make life so hard for one who has intrusted the heart to his keeping ? Should he blame any one but himself if some day he finds that he has wearied and worn out the love which has been so patient, so long suffering, with him ? ** Forgive you f — O, of course, dear, A dozen times a week ! We women were created Forgiveness hut to speak, *' You^d die before you'd hurt me Intentionally ? . . . True. But it is not, O dearest. The thing you mean to do^ [ 190 ] Ci^e Woti) tl^at tuajs not ^atn *^ 7^5 z^Tia^ ^ot^ do, unthinking, That makes the quick tear start ; The tear may he forgotten. But the hurt stays in the heart ; *^ And though I may forgive you A dozen times a dayy Yet each forgiveness wears, dear, A little love away,
 
**And one day you'll he grieving^ And chiding me, no douht, Because so much forgiving Has worn a great love out " But it is possible never to treat our friends unkindly in word or act, and yet to sin griev- ously against them. We sin against others continually in restraining kindly speech, in withholding words which we ought to have spoken, — cheerful, encouraging, helpfiil words. ** The word we had not sense to say, Who knows how grandly it had rung f " We often think, after the opportunity has passed, of some strong, true word we might have spoken at a certain moment, but which [ 191 ] Cl^e ^pptv €munt0 we did not speak. Perhaps "we had not sense "' to say it. With many of us the mind works slowly, and we do not think of the fine answer we could have given or the wise word we might have uttered until it is too late. Our best thoughts ofttimes are after-thoughts, too late to be uttered, and avail us nothing. Or the good word may have been kept in the heart unspoken, through timidity or shyness. Bashfulness is sometimes a hinderer of useful- ness. We want to speak, but we cannot conquer our natural diffidence, and so the kindly or

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->