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THE MINISTRY OF WELL-WISHING..pdf

THE MINISTRY OF WELL-WISHING..pdf

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY J. R. MILLER

There are few hearts in which there do
not lie kindly wishes for others. The man
must be depraved indeed who has only malign
thoughts and desires for his fellow-men. Every
Christian at least wishes others well, since love
is the law of the regenerated life. There are
occasions, too, when the good wishes find their
way to the lips in kindly words.
BY J. R. MILLER

There are few hearts in which there do
not lie kindly wishes for others. The man
must be depraved indeed who has only malign
thoughts and desires for his fellow-men. Every
Christian at least wishes others well, since love
is the law of the regenerated life. There are
occasions, too, when the good wishes find their
way to the lips in kindly words.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Nov 12, 2013
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11/12/2013

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THE MIISTRY OF WELL-WISHIG. BY J. R. MILLER '' It is not the deed that we do, Though the deed be never so fair, But the love that the dear Lord looketh for, Hidden with holy care. In the heart of the deed so fair." There are few hearts in which there do not lie kindly wishes for others. The man must be depraved indeed who has only malign thoughts and desires for his fellow-men. Every Christian at least wishes others well, since love is the law of the regenerated life. There are occasions, too, when the good wishes find their way to the lips in kindly words. We say " Good-morning " when we meet a neighbor, and " Good-by " when we part from him. When our friends' birthdays come, we are in the habit of finding many delicate and pleasant ways of expressing our good will. The Christmas-time 146 MIISTRY OF WELL-WISHIG. and the ew-Year usually thaw out of our hearts the laggard good feelings, prompting us to many acts and words of kindness. It is well that our hearts have their seasons of gen- erous blossoming, even if they are so brief, and are fixed by the almanac. It is well that any thing whatsoever has power to touch our lips with fire from the altar of love, and teach us to speak the gentle words which the lives
 
about us are so hungry to hear. One of the saddest things about life is, that, with such boundless power to give cheer to others by our speech, most of us pass through the world in silence, locking up in our own hearts the thoughtful and helpful words which we might speak, and which, if spoken, would minister so much strength and inspiration. Hearts are breaking with sorrow ; men are bowing under burdens too heavy for them ; duty is too large, battles are too sore. On every hand, and in every life, there is need for love's ministry, that men and women may not fail. or is it large and costly service that usually is needed : the kindly utterance of a MIISTRY OF WELL-WISHIG. 147 kindly feeling will often give all the impulse and inspiration required. And the feeling is always close at hand, wanting but to be put into honest words, and spoken where the strug- gle is going on. Yet many of us let the good will lie in our heart unuttered, and stand by in silence while our brother beside us goes down in defeat which one word of ours would have changed into victory. It is not the want of love that is our fault, but the penuriousness which locks up the love, and will not give it out to bless others. Is any miserliness so mean .? We let hearts starve to death close beside us, when in our hands is the food to keep them living, and make them strong : then when they lie in the dust of defeat, we come with our love to make funeral-wreaths for them, and speak elo- quent eulogiums to their memory.
 
" What silences we keep year after year. With those who are most near to us and dear ; We live beside each other day by day, And speak of myriad things, but seldom say The full, sweet word that lies just in our reach. Beneath the commonplace of common speech 148 MIISTRY OF WELL-WISHIG, Then out of sight and out of reach they go, — These close, familiar friends who loved us so ; And sitting in the shadow they have left. Alone, with loneliness, and sore bereft. We think with vain regret of some kind word That once we might have said, and they have heard." How much better it would be if, at all times, we gave freer rein to our lips in speaking kindly and cheering words ! It is truly very sad when nothing less than the death of our friends can draw from our slow and selfish hearts the debt of love and of helpfulness that we owe them. " This is the cruel cross of life, to be Full-visioned only when the ministry Of death has been fulfilled, and in the place Of some dear presence is but empty space." The warmest utterances then of love's good will cannot stir again the heart's chilled cur- rents. It is too late to cheer the defeated spirit to new and victorious struggle. There

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