Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
5Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Charts, Figures, and Presentations (8.5x11)

Charts, Figures, and Presentations (8.5x11)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 617 |Likes:
Published by Matt Warren
In April of 2009, I attended the Presenting Data and Information seminar by Edward Tufte. Over the course of the nine-hour session, I learned a great deal about how to develop great infographics, handouts, and presentations. These are the notes from that course.

(8.5x11 Large Print Notes)

This is for those of you without access to a large-format printer.

In addition to being formatted for the typical paper size, this PDF is easier on the eyes of those who have reading difficulty.

The accompanying blog post is here: http://docbadwrench.wordpress.com/2009/09/01/charts-figures-and-presentations/
In April of 2009, I attended the Presenting Data and Information seminar by Edward Tufte. Over the course of the nine-hour session, I learned a great deal about how to develop great infographics, handouts, and presentations. These are the notes from that course.

(8.5x11 Large Print Notes)

This is for those of you without access to a large-format printer.

In addition to being formatted for the typical paper size, this PDF is easier on the eyes of those who have reading difficulty.

The accompanying blog post is here: http://docbadwrench.wordpress.com/2009/09/01/charts-figures-and-presentations/

More info:

Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Matt Warren on Aug 10, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/11/2014

pdf

A guide to creating excellent presentations
Inspired by the work of Edward Tufte with additional inspiration from other experts in the field of information visualization
Charts, Figures, and Presentations
Your presentation should be describable in three-paragraphs that
address the following questions: What\u2019s the problem? What\u2019s the
relevance? What\u2019s the solution?

New tools and techniques have made it possible to accumulate more data than ever before. While obtaining relevant data is growing, our methods of communicating the data have changed little over the past few decades.

In an increasingly visual scientific world, your pictures and words are more important than ever. In the past, crafting a good picture of data was the exception. It\u2019s now the rule.

In an article, presentation, or poster, our goal is to turn data into a
story. A leads to B leads to C. This handout is a reference tool for
telling the story that surrounds your data.
a handout by
Matt Warren
A portion of a graphic produced by Stephen Malinowski\u2019s Musical Animation Machine, depicting Frederic Chopin\u2019s Berceuse, opus 57
This graphic can be found on page 46 of Beautiful Evidence
The Problem

The average PowerPoint presentation contains elements that have no relevance to the data: busy backgrounds, cute clipart, and animated effects. This is largely because PowerPoint templates are about PowerPoint, not your data. PowerPoint\u2019s

formreplacesthe substance of your presentation.

Realistic models of causation cannot be conveyed in a bullet list. The speaker may properly explain it, but the effort will be undermined by projected information that fights for the audience\u2019s attention. A narrative is required. This narrative is verbally communicated. Reserve your projected materialschief ly for displaying data graphics or straightforward concepts.

Data graphics should draw the viewer's attention to the sense and substance of the data, not to something else. The data graphical form should present the quantitative contents. Statistical graphics are instruments to help people reason about quantitative information.

The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, p91
Two Methods

Consider these two methods when crafting your presentation. Both have their uses, depending upon the content of your talk.

1. The Seth Godin Approach
Sequential Storytelling

If you are crafting a traditional presentation, then keep all your handouts and reference materials until the end of the talk. This ensures that people are not reading your handout when they should be listening to your story. Also, never use slide-printouts as a handout because they won\u2019t work without you. If your graphics convey a basic overview of data, then this approach is suitable.

2. The Edward Tufte Approach
Conversational Exploration

If you are crafting a presentation that contains a high volume of data, then provide a data-dump to your audience, give them some time to read it, and then explore it using a minimal number of slides. If your graphics contain dense, multivariate data, then this approach is suitable.

Regardless of the method you employ, your presentation is about your ideas and your story: not slides and pictures (which are secondary and supportive).

Some Solutions
Use PowerPoint as a projector.
Create as little content as possible in PowerPoint.
Remove anything superfluous.
If it can be removed andn ot adversely affect informa-
tion transfer, then you didn\u2019t need it.
Use slides to reinforce arguments, not repeat them.

Don\u2019t parrot the slide\u2019s contents. Your audience will
divide their attention between the screen and you; they
will do neither well.

Blank the display to draw the audience back to you.
When you want people to pay attention to what you
have to say, blank the slide. All eyes will return to you.
Use six or fewer words per slide.
This will increase information transfer, not reduce it.
Don\u2019t display what should be printed.
High-density data should not live on a slide when it has
more power as a print-out.
Avoid the use of bullet-points.
Fewer words on your slide negates the need for bullets.
Don\u2019t draw attention to admin elements or PowerPoint.
It\u2019s not about logos or the software you used to create
the presentation. It\u2019s about your data.
Never use the built-in templates.
They are designed to distract the viewer and obsfucate
data.
The Dangers of Powerpoint
The Edward Tufte Approach

How efficient the information throughput in a data-rich meeting? How can you increase it? Edward Tufte\u2019s approach is to (1) give participants a high-resolution data-dump and then (2) talk about the data.

The goal of this approach is to explore data that is not stacked in time, as in a traditional presentation. Rather than stepping sequentially through slides, present the data up front and then discuss it. This results in a technical, informal tone and meetings that are up to 30% shorter.

Supergraphics

A supergraphic is an 11x17 data-dump that is handed out prior to your presentation. It is clean, colorful, and packed with data. It is designed to encourage exploration and questions.

The development of removable-type publishing acciden- tally divorced words and images. We gained the mass-production of knowledge books, but lost the word-image connection. Modern tools can now reconnect those two methods if we are willing.

This bond between verbal and nonverbal evidence has sometimes come undone in the process of publishing, as the assorted technologies of reproduction and presenta- tion have segregated information by the accident of its mode of production. What has happened during 1,200 years of presenting text and images on paper and computer screens \u2013 and what can be done about it?

Beautiful Evidence, p83
Creation Tips
Create clean graphics.
Use report-like designs, professional typefaces and
believable narratives.
Express your credibility.
Put your name on what you do and provide sources for
all relevant data.
Make people smarter through your presentation.
Don't dumb down the data; raise the audience's
understanding.
Use the display screen sparingly.
Only display in support of what is discussed.
Know and respect your audience.
If you don't know them, you can't address their concerns.
If you don't respect them, you will underestimate them.
The Presentation
1. Preparation

Get the best possible content however you need to. Don't reinvent anything that can be acquired and modified.

2. Practice

If possible, practice in front of a camera so you can examine any behavioral distractions. Also, listen to a recording of your presentation to learn what verbal tics you might express.

3. Showtime
Show up early for your meeting. Meet with your
audience and personalize the experience for them.
4. Conclusion

Finish your presentation early. You have more time for questions and the positive impression you leave on your audience will make them happy.

A New Meeting Format
This image has been edited to show only the relevant graphic. To view this in its entirety and at its actual size, visit Matt Warren\u2019s desk.
Charles Joseph Minard's data-map describes the successive losses in men of the French army during the French invasion of
Russia in 1812. Vivid historical content and brilliant design combine to make this one of the best statistical graphics ever.
Beautiful Evidence, p124

Activity (5)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
German M Altgelt liked this
gman11 liked this
mkz.tbp liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->