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LEGION CAST OUT..pdf

LEGION CAST OUT..pdf

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Published by glennpease
BY THE REV. WM. E. ORMSBY, A. M.



Mark v. 19.

Howheit, Jesus suffered him not, but saith unto him, Go home to thy frif nda, and tell tliem
how great things the Lord hath done for thee, and hath had compassion on thee."
BY THE REV. WM. E. ORMSBY, A. M.



Mark v. 19.

Howheit, Jesus suffered him not, but saith unto him, Go home to thy frif nda, and tell tliem
how great things the Lord hath done for thee, and hath had compassion on thee."

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Published by: glennpease on Nov 14, 2013
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LEGIO CAST OUT. BY THE REV. WM. E. ORMSBY, A. M. Mark v. 19. Howheit, Jesus suffered him not, but saith unto him, Go home to thy frif nda, and tell tliem how great things the Lord hath done for thee, and hath had compassion on thee." We can hardly picture to ourselves, my brethren, a more frightful condition than that in which the individual was found who is here addressed by the Redeemer •. As to his dwelling, it was among the tombs, the abode of desolation and pol- lution. The very touch of a grave, we find from the Levitical law, was reckoned defiling, (umbers, xix. 16.) As to his state of mind, " no man could bind him, no not with chains;" his was a raging madness, that exposed him to danger, and others to constant terror. As to his occupation, " he was always night and day, (Tying and cutting himself with stones." So desperate was his condi- tion, and so terrible his appearance, that (St. Matthew tells us,) "no man could pass that way ;" no man — no fellow- Vol. I. creature could venture to approach, or
 
try to assist him. There was one, how- ever, who could do both, and that one was near: " When he saw Jesus, he ran and worshipped him ;" his fury subsided, like the storm a little before, at Jesus' command, (Mark iv. 39.) There was something, perhaps, in the holy counte- nance of Jesus that at once controlled what was beyond man's power to control. " Strong" as Satan was, he did not, he could not check the desire implanted in his victim's heart by one who was "stronger than he." We know what followed ; how the unclean spirit came out of the man, entered into the swine, and how the whole herd perished. We know the effect on the inhabitants of the city and country where it occurred ; " they went 242 THE EW IRISH PULPIT, out to see what it was that was done ," — and what did they see ? They saw him that was possessed with the devil, and had the legion, " sitting and clothed, and in his right mind." ow observe the change produced in this man. Before, his dwelling was among the tombs — now, he was at " the feet of
 
Jesus ;" before, he had no clothing — now, he was " clothed ;" before, he was out of his mind, and ungovernably furious — now, he was calm, and " in hisright mind." Well might the whole city have cried out, " What hath God wrought — this is the finger of God !" but no — wonderful as was the sight, it was lost on the Gada- renes ; their hard hearts preferred their swine to their Saviour ; they dreaded a repetition of their loss — " they began to pray him to depart out of their coasts." There was one indeed who felt and spoke differently — the object of Jesus' compassion. He followed him to the ship (with tears perhaps like Paul's company, Acts xx. 38,) " and when he was come into the ship, he prayed him that he might be with him." He could not bear the thought of mixing with his own countrymen again ; he shuddered at the recollection of his miserable abode among the tombs; he dreaded the possibility of being forced to return thither; his own cries seemed still to pierce through his ears  — his wounds seemed to be opened afresh ; above all, he could not bear to leave one so tender, so compassionate, and so kind — he praijed him — like Ruth to her bene- factress, he " entreated that he might not leave him, nor return from following him ;" with Ruth, he seemed to say, " whither thou goest I will go" — I can no longer stay with my own people, who have so rejected thee ; for the future, " thy people shall be my people ;" I can no longer bear to dwell among the tombs, but " where thou diest I will die." " How-

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