Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Christ and the Little Child.

Christ and the Little Child.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY JAMES MARTINEAU.


Luke xyiii. 17.

verily i sat unto you, wnosoeter shall not receiye the
kixgdom of god as a little child, shall in no wise enter

THEREIN.
BY JAMES MARTINEAU.


Luke xyiii. 17.

verily i sat unto you, wnosoeter shall not receiye the
kixgdom of god as a little child, shall in no wise enter

THEREIN.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Nov 15, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/15/2013

pdf

text

original

 
CHRIST AD THE LITTLE CHILD. BY JAMES MARTIEAU. Luke xyiii. 17. verily i sat unto you, wnosoeter shall not receiye the kixgdom of god as a little child, shall in no wise enter THEREI. By the kingdom of God was meant neither the future state of the righteous, nor the dominion of Christianity in the world; but the personal reign of Messiah over a favored and faithful people, on a renovated earth. The prospect of this period was, however, to the people of Palestine, nearly what the hope of heaven is to the Christian: — it embodied all their ideas of divine privilege and happiness, and, coinciding with their conception of religious exist- ence, became their great symbol, by which to express the most blessed system of relations between the hu- man mind and God. Into this system they esteemed it their birth-right to enter ; the title and prerogative were in their blood, — the blood of patriarchs whom they had ceased to resemble, and of prophets of whose spirit they had none. At the gate of the king- dom they looked with no meek and far-off desire; they knelt and knocked with no suppliant air, breathing such confessions of un worthiness as give security for gratitude; but turned on it the greedy eye of property, CHRIST AD THE LITTLE CHILD. 251 and rushed to it with intent to ' do what they liked with their own,' — so that 'the kingdom of heaven suffered violence, and the violent would take it by
 
force.' Scarcely were they content with the notion of admission as its subjects; they must be its lords and administrators too. For them, thought the Pharisees, were its dignities and splendors created, for them its patronage reserved ; and the glorious sovereignty of God was to be, not over them, but hy them ; so that, in every proffer of their services to Him, they con- templated, not the humility of submission, but the pride of command. Before such it was that Jesus held in his arms a child, gazing on his face, no doubt, in wonder, not without a pleased look of trust, and said, ' Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, shall in no wise enter therein.' The occasion was slight and transient; the senti- ment is profound and universal. In no other way could our Lord have made the irreligion of the Phari- sees' temper more obvious, because nowhere could he have found a more genuine emblem of the pure religious spirit than in a child. ot, as will hereafter appear, because a child's heart is peculiarly devo- tional; nor because the moral qualities of early life possess the romantic purity and perfection sometimes ascribed to them; much less, because maturity affords a less fitting scope for the exercise of the holy mind ; but, because the relations of infancy resemble the religious relations ; the natural conditions of its exist- ence are the same that are felt by the devout heart ; and hence without any singularity of merit, the spirit of childhood, acquired by simple accommodations to the laws of its being, is a just representative of the temper which devotion imparts to the mature. Let 252 CIIRiaT AD TIIK LITTLE CHILD. US traco. some of tlio analogies between the spirit of childhood and th(i spirit of religion. Religion, it is obvious, can have place only in
 
created and dt^pendent minds. God cannot be de- vout ; and though wc have a term, viz. ' /to///,' appli- cable, as an c})ithet of moral description, to him in common with good men, the word, singularly enough, expresses, in reference to the human mind, precisely the only quality which cannot possibly attach to the Divine; — 'a Jiolij man^ meaning one whose excel- lence has a religious root; — 'a holy God' denoting the only being in the spiritual universe, whose per- fections livv imsusceptii)le of the colors of n^ligious emotion. IL^ who has no liiglu^r than himself must be stranger to the unspeakable rev(;rence that gazes upwards on a goodness not its own; he who is him- self the measure of all that is divine is vuiconscious of the presence of a yet diviner; and though we cannot Bpeak of his moral attributes, without implying that he respects and loves the right, yet his venerating regards must look for this great idea, not forth, as on some outward being who furnish the conception, but irif/iin, where alone is the Infinitude that befits the Infinite. Yet it is not strictly Deity alone whose nature may exclude the possibilities of religion. This peculi- arity may arise, without our seeking it at that supreme height. A mind, possessed not of literal Omniscience, but of power simply equal to its conceptions, a mind absolute within its own n^alm, and limited only by its desires, would be incapable of veneration, because unconscious of a superior; and though he mighi really live in a narrow ring environed by the im- measurable deep of things, — so long as he mistook CHRIST AD THE LITTLE CHILD. 253 its circle for the total universe, he would feel, not as dependent, but as God, — Lord of his little island in the sea of tilings, and ignorant of all bej^ond. ot

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->