Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Man's Response to the Gospel.

Man's Response to the Gospel.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY JOHN HOWARD HINTON, M.A,


THE Gospel is one, as man's sin and ruin are one ; and
thus they are adapted the one to the other. God has but
one thing to say to mankind, and he fitly says it in the same
terms to all men. But man's heart is multiform, ever varying
in its constitutional susceptibilities, and presenting different
manifestations under the influence of the one and common
appeal. There are great differences in the facility with which
knowledge is admitted, and in the kind of feeling which is
developed the sorrowful, even to despondency or despair,
the obstinate in various degrees of intensity, or the confiding
and the hopeful, approaching to rapturous joy.
BY JOHN HOWARD HINTON, M.A,


THE Gospel is one, as man's sin and ruin are one ; and
thus they are adapted the one to the other. God has but
one thing to say to mankind, and he fitly says it in the same
terms to all men. But man's heart is multiform, ever varying
in its constitutional susceptibilities, and presenting different
manifestations under the influence of the one and common
appeal. There are great differences in the facility with which
knowledge is admitted, and in the kind of feeling which is
developed the sorrowful, even to despondency or despair,
the obstinate in various degrees of intensity, or the confiding
and the hopeful, approaching to rapturous joy.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Nov 16, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/16/2013

pdf

text

original

 
MA'S RESPOSE TO THE GOSPEL. BY JOH HOWARD HITO, M.A, THE Gospel is one, as man's sin and ruin are one ; and thus they are adapted the one to the other. God has but one thing to say to mankind, and he fitly says it in the same terms to all men. But man's heart is multiform, ever varying in its constitutional susceptibilities, and presenting different manifestations under the influence of the one and common appeal. There are great differences in the facility with which knowledge is admitted, and in the kind of feeling which is developed the sorrowful, even to despondency or despair, the obstinate in various degrees of intensity, or the confiding and the hopeful, approaching to rapturous joy. The aspects of human character thus presented are assuredly not only the most interesting, but the most important, which can attract the attention of those who concern themselves with the dissemination of divine truth, since they at once manifest the power of the Gospel, and call for a practical treatment -on which consequences of infinite moment may depend. Little attention can be devoted to them without its being perceived that this treatment requires much wisdom, and involves many difficulties ; and the labourer in this depart- ment of spiritual toil may soon and often come to feel his unskilful ness, and to desire counsel. In this respect it has pleased God not very largely to furnish us with inspired exemplifications. As in morals we have a few general pre- cepts for the direction of Christian duty rather than an extended system of casuistry, so, in relation to experience, have we rather the great truths by which it is to be excited and regulated, than a specific treatment of its diversified manifestations. Under these circumstances Christian labour- ers, ministers and others, are fain at times to have recourse one to another for assistance in their judgment of particular cases, and in determining the most scriptural and effectual H H
 
474 MA S RESPOSE treatment of them. Such aid is undoubtedly of great value. It is obvious, however, that this is only one ignorant and fallible mortal consulting another certainly equally fallible, and perhaps equally ignorant ; and that no advice so given can properly be made more than matter for one's own considera- tion and decision. Could we ask Peter or Paul to solve our difficulties, we might be sure of getting an answer at once in harmony with Gospel truth, and expressive of Christian wisdom ; but cases of treatment from the portfolios of unin- spired men, however eminent, not only may, but must be looked upon in the light of Scripture, and in the exercise of an independent judgment. With this prefatory remark, we proceed to introduce to the notice of our readers a work which has just issued from the press,* and in which assuredly every serious reader of it will feel deeply interested. It is from the pen of the late Dr. Spencer, an eminent Presbyterian minister at Brooklyn, in the United States. It contains no less than forty cases selected from his own ministerial experience, "sketches from real life facts, not fancies." They are all graphically de- scribed, and some of them delineated with great power. They exhibit also on his part, not only singular pastoral industry and eminent faithfulness, but great tact, skilful discrimination, and sound judgment. The book is said to be reprinted "from the ninth American edition," and we cannot doubt but it will have an extensive sale in England. The popularity of the work before us will undoubtedly be increased in consequence of its being ushered into the world the English world, we mean rimder the auspices of Mr. James, of Birmingham, who has written for it an Introduc- tion of nearly eighty pages. This portion of the volume this distinguished and amiable man has devoted almost en- tirely to a discussion of " The means and methods to be adopted for a successful ministry," and it is enough to say
 
that he has written it in a manner worthy of himself. Some points occurred to us as open to criticism ; but as we continued to read, we felt we could not criticise it it was * "A Pastor's Sketches; or, Conversations with Auxious Inquirers respecting the Way of Salvation. By J. S. Spencer, D.D., Pastor of Second Presbyterian Clmrch, Brooklyn, . Y. With an Introduction and Editorial otes, by J. A, James." London, 1855. TO THE GOSPEL. 475 too good, too solemn, too faithful. We trust we felt humbled and stimulated by it, and we shall satisfy ourselves with recommending every minister of the Gospel to read it, and to read it in a spirit approaching as nearly as any human work will allow to that in which he reads the Bible. We pass on to the Sketches, of which our readers will naturally expect that we should present to them some speci- mens ; and we shall do so not promiscuously, however, but in sxich a manner as to set before them the views entertained by Dr. Spencer of the work of the Holy Spirit, and thus to prepare the way for some remarks which we think it our duty to offer. The third narrative is entitled, " Waiting for the Holy Spirit," and it contains the following passage : " 'Ob, sir,' said she (the tears streaming from her eyes, and her sensations almost choking utterance) ; ' I would give all the world to be a Christian ! I know I am a sinner, an undone sinner! I have a vile and wicked heart. I have sinned all my life ! I wonder God has spared me so long.' ' ' ' But he lias spared you, madam ; when you did not deserve it. And what has he spared you for, but that you should repent of sin,

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->