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Dumfries Galloway Industrial Revolution

Dumfries Galloway Industrial Revolution

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Published by Alistair Livingston

Between 1760 and 1800, Improving landowners inspired by the Scottish Enlightenment transformed the landscape of southern Scotland. An industrial revolution led to a further transformation north of the Southern Uplands Fault. To the south, Dumfries and Galloway remained a rural region with agriculture as its main industry. The perception of the region as ‘quintessentially rural’ has led to the neglect of the region’s significant role in the development of the industrial revolution in north-west England. In the late eighteenth century, a group of young men from Dumfries and Galloway moved south in search of employment. Some arrived in Liverpool where they became wealthy merchants, others became innovative and successful cotton manufacturers in Manchester. However, as the rapid and chaotic growth of Manchester in particular came to symbolise the challenges posed by industrialisation, critics of the new order also emerged from Dumfries and Galloway. Thomas Carlyle is the most well known, but Newton Stewart born Dr. Peter McDouall, who became a radical Chartist, was another. Finally, James Clerk Maxwell’s work pointed beyond Carlyle’s Mechanical Age to the present Electrical Age .

Between 1760 and 1800, Improving landowners inspired by the Scottish Enlightenment transformed the landscape of southern Scotland. An industrial revolution led to a further transformation north of the Southern Uplands Fault. To the south, Dumfries and Galloway remained a rural region with agriculture as its main industry. The perception of the region as ‘quintessentially rural’ has led to the neglect of the region’s significant role in the development of the industrial revolution in north-west England. In the late eighteenth century, a group of young men from Dumfries and Galloway moved south in search of employment. Some arrived in Liverpool where they became wealthy merchants, others became innovative and successful cotton manufacturers in Manchester. However, as the rapid and chaotic growth of Manchester in particular came to symbolise the challenges posed by industrialisation, critics of the new order also emerged from Dumfries and Galloway. Thomas Carlyle is the most well known, but Newton Stewart born Dr. Peter McDouall, who became a radical Chartist, was another. Finally, James Clerk Maxwell’s work pointed beyond Carlyle’s Mechanical Age to the present Electrical Age .

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Published by: Alistair Livingston on Nov 18, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/18/2013

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