Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Christian Exultation.

Christian Exultation.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY Samuel Porter Williams


Galatians, vi. 14.

But God forbid that I should glory ^ save in the cross of our Lord
Jesus Christ By whom the world is crucified unto me^ and I unto
the world.
BY Samuel Porter Williams


Galatians, vi. 14.

But God forbid that I should glory ^ save in the cross of our Lord
Jesus Christ By whom the world is crucified unto me^ and I unto
the world.

More info:

Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Nov 19, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/19/2013

pdf

text

original

 
CHRISTIA EXULTATIO. BY Samuel Porter WilliamsGalatians, vi. 14. But God forbid that I should glory ^ save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ By whom the world is crucified unto me^ and I unto the world. I will ascend into the heavens, I will rise above the clouds, I will exalt my throne above the stars, I will be like the Most High." A noble resolution, my brethren ! had it been made in the name of him, who sitteth on the circle of the heavens, and before whom all the inhabitants of earth are as grasshoppers. But intoxicated with the love of pleasure, and deluded with the popular opinion, that there is no hap- piness for man but in independence of God, this instinctive vaunting of the carnal mind becomes, at once, the proof of its impiety, and the harbinger of a fall. It is followed, of consequence, with the denunciation of him, who has deter- mined to be sanctified in all them that approach him, and before all creatures to be glorified. It is of such a mind swollen with the conceit of itself, as if there were none be- side, that God has said — " Though he climb up to heaven, I 03 178 SERMO XIIL will bring him down ; though he hide in the top of Carmel, my hand shall fetch him thence ; and I will set mine eye upon him for evil and not for good." Pride cast angels down from heaven, and drove man from the joyful presence of his Maker ; and every sinner, while he continues to in- dulge it, will find it an insurmountable barrier to his enjoy- ment of God. Through the influence of this viie passion, men have always stumbled at the very threshold of Christian-
 
ity, and rejected the only means of life, because the way to exaltation is by the valley of humiliation. It is the constitu- tion of God, without cheerful submission to which, he will have no man to be saved, that no flesh shall glory in his presence. This truth is, by Jesus Christ, laid at the foun- dation of his system : this truth he lived and died to exhibit, in most striking prominence, for the conviction and profit of man. Jesus Christ humbled himself, before the Father ex- alted him ; and there is a connection between that humilia- tion and exaltation, which the world never understood — which even the disciples, attendant on his personal ministry, were slow to comprehend. To the one, therefore, his cross was foolishness and an obstruction ; to the other, for a time, an occasion of useless mortification. But on the develope- ment of the great mystery of godliness, and the removal of that vail which covers every self-sufiicient, unsubdued heart, the disciples clearly perceived, that " it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bring- ing many sons to glory, to make the Captain of their salva- tion perfect, through sufferings.^' They saw too, that the moral beauty, and greatness, of their lowly Master, had been obscured, only by the false medium through which they had been looking at his system ; and receiving the kingdom of God as little children, they saw his glory, and were changed into his image, glorying only in the cross. The language of the text is figurative ; and the figure, be- SERMO XIH. 179 ing derived from the crucifix — the most disgraceful, and the most distressing instrument of punishment — denotes self-im- molation, from the purest and»noblest motives, and for the highest end. The incarnation, labors, and death of Christ, therefore, constituted his cross : taken up for no other end, than the glory of God in the salvation of sinners. In this extended view of it, the Apostle declares the cross of Christ to be the only ground of human exultation : and the truth
 
of this declaration will appear from the following consider- ations : — It is the only exhibition of true greatness — It fur- nishes the only perfect model of virtue — It forms the only foundation of man's hope — It presents a harmonious and glowing image of all the perfections of the Deity. 1. In the first place, the cross of Christ exhibits all the greatness of which our nature is capable. Amidst all the dei2:radation, and debasement, of our species, something of a God-like nature has glimmered through the ruins. We see in man, the wreck of a once noble and beautiful fabric. His intellectual superiority, his social nature, his susceptibility to generous impressions, though he indulges a propensity to pervert and abuse them all, furnish an illustrious proof, that God made him upright, but little lower than the angels, and the very image of himself. There cannot be a doubt, that man was once justly styled, the Lord of this lower world. But with all these indications of his former elevation, every age has seen, in the confusion of his mind, the warring of his passions, their collision with those of his fellow-men and with the will of heaven, a demonstration of a fall, such as leaves him nothing of his own in which to glory, unless he glory in his shame. While the inventive genius of one dis- tinguished mind, the prowess and enterprize of another, the acuteness and penetration of a third, the fortitude and elo- quence, or generosity and heroism, of others, have given to a few, in every nation, the character of greatness ', it has re- 180 SERMO XIII. mained evident from the beginning, that no man has pos- sessed all these attributes, nor any one of them, at all times: 80 that, after the lapse of four thousand years, not a solitary instance has been furnished, of a character exhibiting through life, all the qualities which constitute true greatness, accord- ing to man's own standard. And, to the humdiation of out race, we are compelled to add, that of those moral proper- ties, without which, the variety and lustre of man's natural

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->