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The Eyeopener — November 20, 2013

The Eyeopener — November 20, 2013

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The Eyeopener — November 20, 2013
The Eyeopener — November 20, 2013

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Published by: The Eyeopener on Nov 20, 2013
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Volume 47 - Issue 11November 20, 2013theeyeopener.com@theeyeopenerSince 1967
P13 From NCAA to OUA
 
Digital Wingman
Is Tinder helping or hurting your love life? P8
P14RyesInvestments
ILLUSTRATION: JESS TSANG, NATALIA BALCERZAK PHOTO: CHARLES VANEGAS
 
2Wednesday Nov. 20, 2013
 
More arrests in Skinner case
Toronto police have made three more arrests in Rye grad’s 2009 homicide
By Angela Hennessy and Ramisha Farooq
Toronto police have made three more arrests in connection with the 2009 death of 27-year-old Ryerson graduate Christopher Skinner.Up to two more arrests could be made.Three men have been charged with various offences. Nichoals Swaby, 23, of Toron-to, was arrested for assault caus-ing bodily harm.Anthony Samuel, 25, of To-ronto, was arrested Monday for conspiracy to commit the indict-able offence of aggravated as-sault and obstructing police. And Jamaal Phillips Bond, 23, was arrested for assault causing bodily harm and obstruction of police.“There were others in the vehicle so there is a possibil-ity of more arrests,” said police spokesperson Wendy Drum-mond. Last week the first arrest in the case was made of 23-year-old Augustin Caruso who was charged with second-degree mur-der for allegedly being the driver of the 2004 black Ford Explorer that ran Skinner over. It is believed there were four males and two females in the SUV at the time of the incident, meaning that there could be up to more arrests made. Skinner was first assaulted on the street and then run over by the SUV after leaving a celebra-tion with his family in Toronto’s entertainment district on Oct. 18, 2009.Drummond told
The Eyeopen-er
that investigators have had close contact with the Skinner family and that these arrests have been bittersweet for them. Drummond also said the inves-tigation is ongoing. “It is believed there were other people in the vehicle and there is potential for more charges,” said DrummondCaruso, who was 19 at the time of the incident, was accom-panied by five others in the SUV.According to Gallant, two more arrests are expected to be made. The SUV has been seized and remains in police custody. After watching surveillance tapes, police believe Skinner’s hand accidentally touched the accused’s SUV as he was trying to hail a cab on the corner of Victoria and Adelaide Streets. Police believe this may have provoked the attack that killed Skinner.After Skinner supposedly touched the SUV, the vehicle’s occupants exited and knocked him to the ground, then punched and kicked him. They got back into the SUV and deliberately ran him over, then sped away east down Ad-elaide Street.Skinner was pronounced dead at 3 a.m. the day of the incident.The family, along with police, had offered a $150,000 reward to anyone who came forward with further information.The investigation is ongoing.
Jamaal Bond, Nicholas Swaby, Augustin Caruso and Anthony Samuel are the four men being charged in relation to the homicide.
IMAGES COURTESY OF THE CBC
3Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013
NEWS
MTV’s nursing show,
Scrubbing In
.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MTV
Nurses stop MTV
By AngelaHennessy
Sexy nursing is a myth. MTV has taken a lot of criti-cism for their new reality show,
Scrubbing In
, and it has now agreed to make changes to the show’s programming.A Change.org petition had been started by a Wisconsin nurse who argued that the show portrays nurses in a negative way by show-ing them partying constantly. The petition ended up getting more than 30,000 signatures and MTV took note.The petition called for the show to be cancelled. “Not only are we tired of the negative stigma that surrounds our profession but also of the senseless sexual objectifica-tion that we as nurses, both male and female, continue to endure,” stated the petition. Alfred Lam, the education and equity co-coordinator of the Ca-nadian Nursing Students’ Asso-ciation at Ryerson, is angered by the show and has been promoting the petition against MTV. The show won’t be cancelled, but MTV said it plans to change
Scrubbing In
’s airtime to mid-night from 10 p.m., a move that will see total viewers cut in half. It will also be editing some of its episodes to show the nurses doing more working and less partying. The show has also angered the Ontario Nurses’ Association who say they are tired of nurses being portrayed in the media as subor-dinates in the medical profession who are there merely to help the doctors.
Scrubbing In
 features a cast of busty, partying young nurses in California. There is at least one male nurse in the cast, but the various nursing associations don’t feel that is doing enough to fairly represent the reality of nurses and nursing.MTV has also agreed to create a feature for its website that will have pictures and video that will better reflect the reality of being a nurse.
Rye study links sleep to depression
Psychology professor leads insomnia study looking to find tie to mental illness
By Jackie Hong
Curing insomnia in people suffer-ing from depression may almost double their chances for recovery, the early results from a Ryerson study are saying.“What we found was that the vast majority of people who recov-er from depression are the people who recover from insomnia,” said associate psychologoy professor Colleen E. Carney, who led the study. “But if you don’t recover from insomnia your chances from re-covering from depression are … much less.”The study involved 66 partici-pants and was conducted at Ryer-son’s Sleep and Depression (SAD) lab. Participants’ insomnia was treated using cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), a method where facilitators examine participants’ sleeping habits and then calculate sleep schedules to fit their individ-ual patterns.According to the preliminary data, 87 per cent of participants who had their insomnia cured also saw their depression dissipate, which is almost double the rate of participants who did not have their insomnia treated.Although the findings of the study are grabbing headlines, Car-ney thinks that another part of it is just as significant — her first-year graduate students were the ones who administered the CBT.“One of the criticisms of cogni-tive behavior therapy is that it’s not widely available,” said Carney. “However, what we wanted to do was show that the graduate stu-dents who provided the treatment came in with pretty much no sleep background at all, and no therapy background.“So that’s really important in-formation because it means that I can go and train a group of … peo-ple who don’t have a sleep back-ground … to do this treatment.”Carney emphasized that the findings are still in the preliminary stages, and that there’s still a lot of data to comb over before any con-crete conclusions can be drawn. For examaple, some of the partic-pants received CBT in conjuction with anti-depressants, while others received CBT with a placebo.“Maybe it’s that you have to treat insomnia but you also have to treat depression with an anti-de-pressant? Or maybe you shouldn’t use an anti-depressant? We don’t know yet,” she said. She added that the final par-ticipant is finishing therapy this month, at which point the data will be sent to an off-site statisti-cian to verify the findings. How-ever, the results are promising because they’re similar to the find-ings of a 2008 Stanford Univer-sity on the same topic.Carney and her team will be presenting their findings for the first time on Saturday at a conven-tion of the Association for Behav-ioral and Cognitive Therapies in Nashville.“Everyone’s getting excited about this, and it is very exciting,” Carney said.“But it’s about to get even more exciting when we actually look at the data.”
The report could be the most significant advance in depression studies since Prozac.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG

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