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The Simplicity and Breadth of Christ as a Religious Teacher

The Simplicity and Breadth of Christ as a Religious Teacher

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
By Newell Dwight Hillis
History a story of imperfect tools, customs, and institu-
tions. An injured world. Long time stands between the
forked stick and the steam plough. Religious institutions ask
time for development. The complexity of the philosophers
and the simplicity of Christ as a religious teacher. Simplicity
as the test of strength. Simplicity as the test of beauty and
the arts. Complexity a sign of weakness. The simplicity of
Christ's idea of God. Unveils God not as fear, or fate, or
force, but as law, guiding providence, and love. The simplest
explanation in religion the truest.
By Newell Dwight Hillis
History a story of imperfect tools, customs, and institu-
tions. An injured world. Long time stands between the
forked stick and the steam plough. Religious institutions ask
time for development. The complexity of the philosophers
and the simplicity of Christ as a religious teacher. Simplicity
as the test of strength. Simplicity as the test of beauty and
the arts. Complexity a sign of weakness. The simplicity of
Christ's idea of God. Unveils God not as fear, or fate, or
force, but as law, guiding providence, and love. The simplest
explanation in religion the truest.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Nov 20, 2013
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06/29/2014

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THE SIMPLICITY AND BREADTH OF CHRIST AS A RELIGIOUS TEACHER By Newell Dwight Hillis" He, who from the Father forth was sent, Came the true Light, light to our hearts to bring; The Word of God, — the telling of His thought ; The Light of God, — the making visible; The far-transcending glory brought In human form with man to dwell ; The dazzling gone — the power not less To show, irradiate, and bless ; The gathering of the primal rays divine, Informing Chaos to a pure sunshine! ^^  — George Macdonald. History a story of imperfect tools, customs, and institu-tions. An injured world. Long time stands between the forked stick and the steam plough. Religious institutions ask time for development. The complexity of the philosophers
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and the simplicity of Christ as a religious teacher. Simplicity as the test of strength. Simplicity as the test of beauty and the arts. Complexity a sign of weakness. The simplicity of Christ's idea of God. Unveils God not as fear, or fate, or force, but as law, guiding providence, and love. The simplest explanation in religion the truest. Christ's view of man. Made in God's image. Therefore the fiill power of the Cre-ator pledged to assist his growth and destiny. Man's growth dependent not upon what he is, but upon what God is. What man shall be when time and the divine resources have wrought their full power upon him. Simplicity of Christ's view of ethics. Grounds man's responsibility in his moral constitution. Separates duty from creeds and churches. Right and wrong organized into the laws of nature and the constitution of man. Simplicity of Christ's view of the Church. Its basis personal allegiance to himself and the uni-versal principles for which Christ stood. Disciples not bound together from without by creeds, but drawn together from within by love. The simplicity of Christ's use of symbols. Religion divine, but its ceremonies human. Christ's empha-sis of liberty, toleration^ and charity. The coming church. I 113
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1 14 The Simplicity and Breadth of Christ nr^HE excavators who have uncovered for us -*• the streets and houses of Pompeii have assembled in a museum all the bronzes, marbles, ivories, mosaics they have discovered. Unfortu-nately, not one single object has escaped some form of injury. The winged Mercury stands forth with broken arms and legs. The white forehead of Venus holds a black stain. All the  precious tablets are cracked, while the rolls found in Pliny's father's tomb hold writings faded and dim. The universal damage that has befallen the products of man's arts and industries leads the mind to expect that man's customs and insti-tutions will suffer some grievous accidents. And experience wrings from us the confession, that imperfection does attend all that man achieves. Through some error, man's train leaves the track, his ship strikes the rock, his bridge breaks, his wealth takes wings, his health gives way. Even the wisest book holds some ignorance, the greatest oration includes some error, the sweetest music
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