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9-12-13

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Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Nov 21, 2013
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O
 Volume 126 Issue 13
kansan.com
 Thursday, September 12, 2013
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2BCROSSWORD 5ACRYPTOQUIPS 5AOPINION 4ASPORTS 1BSUDOKU 5A
Morning clouds and evening sun. 20 percent chance of rain. Wind N at 9 mph.
Tomorrow is Friday the 13th. Wear a lucky charm.
IndexDon’t forgetToday’s Weather
The sun will come out.
HI: 88LO: 55
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
LOVE
 
IT OR
HATE
IT,
 
 ADULTHOOD
IS UPON US
 ALL.
PAGE 3APAGE 5A
TWO NEW IPHONES ANNOUNCED
PAGE 6A 
HOBBS ADDS LOCAL FLAVOR
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY GEORGE MULLINIX
BUT IT WON’T BE
 AN OVERNIGHT
PROCESS.
 
Check out opinion 
PAGE 4APAGE 2B
THE MORNING BREW
 
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison KohnDylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTBusiness manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren ArmendarizHayley JozwiakElise ReuterMadison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole AnnebergAllyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS Media director and content stategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2013PAGE 2ACONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: UDK_NewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
 Jay?
 What’s the
FridaySaturdaySundayHI: 80HI: 82HI: 88LO: 52LO: 62LO: 60
— weather.com 
 
Partly cloudy. 10 percent chance of rain. Wind NE at 9 mph.Isolated T-Storms. 30 percent chance of rain. Wind SE at 10 mph.Isolated T-storms. 30 percent chance of rain. Wind S at 8 mph.
Fall is nally near.Getting warmer...Good day to study inside.
Calendar
What:
The Role of Islam in Post 9/11 America
When:
7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union, Woodruff Auditorium
About:
 A lecture by Arsalan Iftikhar, international human rights lawyer and author.
What:
Sexy Science
When:
5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Where:
 Dyche Hall
About:
Games, activities and snacks for KU students 18 years or older
Thursday, Sept. 12Friday, Sept. 13Saturday, Sept. 14Sunday, Sept. 15
What:
Conversation Featuring Artist James Turrell
When:
11 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where:
Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium
About:
A discussion exploring themes of the  James Turrell light exhibit opening at noon
What:
 Carillon Recital
When:
5 to 5:30 p.m.
Where:
Campanile
About:
A performance by Elizabeth Berghart on the 53 bronze bells in the Campanile.
What:
Sand Volleyball Tournament
When:
 4 to 7 p.m.
Where:
Ambler Student Recreation Fitness Center, Sand Volleyball CourtsAbout: Six-person team or club tour-nament for cash prizes, presented by Student Union Activities.
What:
Potselui Putina (Putin’s Kiss)
When:
7 p.m.
Where:
318
 
Bailey Hall
About:
Film and snacks presented by the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies.
What:
Monarch Watch Fall Open HouseWhen: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.Where: Foley HallAbout: Open house, refreshments, hands-on activities, garden and lab tours, tagging demonstrations and bugs.
What:
 Fabrications, or How to Lie with Computer Vision
When:
11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union, Alderson Auditorium
About:
Keynote speech on manipulat-ing modern technology
ALANIC CIY, N.J. — Miss Kansas Teresa Vail says she wants to break the stereotype that women with visible tattoos don’t compete in pageants.So during the swimsuit portion o the Miss America competition on uesday, Vail revealed two tat-toos — the Serenity Prayer on her right side and the insignia o the U.S. Army Dental Corps on her lef shoulder.Vail is a 22-year-old senior at Kansas State University. She’s also a member o the Army Nation-al Guard who wants to become a military dentist.Her platorm is helping women overcome stereotypes and break barriers.Given her platorm, she wrote on her blog last month: “What a hypocrite I would be i I covered the ink.”Te Miss America pageant is back in Atlantic City, N.J., afer a six-year absence. Te finale will be Sunday night.
PAGEANTFRESHMENSTUDENT SENATEPOLITICS
Miss Kansas: a unique pageant contestant 
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Theresa Vail, Miss Kansas, takes part in the swimsuit competition during the first night of the Miss America Pageant at Boardwalk Hall, in Atlantic City, N.J.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Students elect newfreshmen senators
Five new freshman senators were elected to serve in the University Student Senate on Wednesday. Stephonn Alcorn, Mary Sniezek, Maddi Duncan, Jake Novicoff and TJ Blake were voted into office out of 27 freshmen who campaigned to fill five seats.The large number of students run-ning for Student Senate was in part due to the Student Senate Executive Staff’s diligent work to recruit fresh-man candidates during the summer and beginning of the fall semester, said Tyler Childress, chief of staff for the Student Senate.Student senators are expected to advocate for the students they represent, reach out to their assigned organizations and positively promote the Student Senate to the rest of the student body, Childress said.“We have tried to continue to expand the impact and frequency of student voices,” Childress said.Alcorn, Sniezek, Duncan and Novicoff decided to “run together,” which meant that they asked fresh-men voters to vote for their team of candidates, Alcorn said.“Our primary method of campaign-ing was a lot of face-to-face human contact,” Alcorn said.Alcorn said that he is excited to get involved and start making his mark on Student Senate.Childress said he commended the efforts of the freshman class and the Student Senate to work toward a more inclusive program.
— Jennifer Salva 
Resolution to Wetlands bill amended, passed
Five bills were presented, discussed and passed at last night’s first full Student Senate meeting. However, most of the discussion was spent on a resolution regarding a decision the University made to give land to the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) for the construction of the South Lawrence Trafficway.The resolution was created because students weren’t consulted in the decision, thus violating a Student Senate code. It also states that the decision “will have a lasting and damaging environmental, educa-tional, and cultural impact on the Wetlands and University community.”KDOT plans to construct the South Lawrence Trafficway which will run directly through the Wakarusa Wetlands. The debate resulted partly from the two different motives of the resolution and partly because, as brought up by Senator Zach George, many of the people in the room were new to Senate and not familiar with all the facts.George said that because the reso-lution addressed two things — the code and the Trafficway project — it wasn’t good governing to pass the resolution as is.He amended the resolution to ex-clude clauses that provided a stance on the project itself.After more than an hour of debate, the resolution passed as amended 28-24 with one senator abstaining.Mark Savoy, who presented the bill, said the bill was important to promote the student voice.“I think I have to be satisfied with it,” Savoy said. “because it represented the voice of the body and that’s what I was trying to convey and represent.”
—Kaitlyn Klein 
NEW YORK — Anthony Weiner's ill-ated mayoral campaign ended with a string o final embarrassments: He mustered a mere 5 percent at the ballot box. One o his sexting partners tried to crash his primary night rally. And Weiner was caught making an obscene gesture to reporters as he was driven away.Outside a "victory" party where supporters mourned a disappointing fifh-place finish in the Democratic primary, cameras crowded around Sydney Leathers, the 23-year-old whose sexting with the ormer congressman brought his once-high-flying campaign to a screeching halt."Why not be here?" Leathers asked reporters. "I'm kind o the reason he's losing. So, might as well show up."Another politician with a sex scandal, Eliot Spitzer, lost the Democratic primary contest or city comptroller to Scott Stringer, the Manhattan bor-ough president. Stringer took 52 percent o the vote to Spitzer's 48 percent.Spitzer resigned as governor in 2008 and admitted he paid or sex with call girls. In exile, he bounced around television as a pundit. Ten, just our days be-ore the deadline, he announced he was running or comptroller.On the final campaign day or both men, the spotlight ell heavily on Weiner. His staff sneaked him into his own event, presumably to avoid Leathers, who had camped outside his headquarters all day hoping to conront him. His wie, Huma Abedin, who stood by his side at the height o the scandal, was nowhere to be seen.And afer a concession speech in which he got choked up as he spoke o amily, a scowling Weiner was caught by a photog-rapher giving a middle-finger goodbye to reporters as he was driven away.Leathers, who has launched a porn career since the scandal broke, said Weiner needed "to stop being an embarrassment to the city o New York. He's going to continue this behavior. I it's not going to be me, it's going to be some other girl."At one point, one o Weiner's supporters scolded Leathers, saying: "You must really be ashamed!"For his part, Weiner acknowl-edged in his concession speech that he was an "imperect mes-senger" but also boasted o the staying power o himsel and his campaign.Weiner had been in politi-cal exile since he resigned rom Congress in 2011 or sending women lewd online messages and pictures. He got into the mayor's race in May, and aside rom a ew dust-ups with hecklers, was largely well-received at first, holding the lead or most o June and July.But afer an obscure gos-sip website named Te Dirty released X-rated exchanges between Weiner and Leathers that took place well afer the candidate quit the House o Representatives, Weiner — and his sexting pseudonym, Carlos Danger — once again became a national punchline.With 98 percent o precincts reporting Wednesday morn-ing, Weiner was ar behind in the city's Democratic mayoral primary.
Anthony Weiner’s political comeback runs out of steam
ASSOCIATED PRESS
“I’m kind of the reason he’s losing. So, might as well show up.”
SYDNEY LEATHERSFormer sexting partner
 
Apple unveiled two new iPhones on uesday: the sleek and powerul iPhone 5S, and a new type o bud-get iPhone, the iPhone 5C. According to Apple, the iPhone 5S is up to twice as ast as the iP-hone 4 and 5 due to its new pro-cessor and iOS capabilities. Te 5C will only receive a slight upgrade on processing power but is avail-able in a variety o colors. Te iPhone 5S will start at $199 under a two-year contract with a major service provider. Te 5S has an A7 chip built in that is twice as ast as its predecessor, and 40 times aster than the original iPhone, according to Apple. Te new finger rec-ognition system will allow users to unlock their phones by placing one o their fingers on the home button.Te iPhone 5S also received a camera upgrade that adds eatures such as burst mode, improved dual LED-based flash and slow motion. Te 5S will be cased in an alumi-num alloy body, and is available in three colors: space gray, silver and gold. Te phone will be $199 or the 16GB model, $299 or the 32GB and $399 or the 64GB, with a two-year contract. Without a contract, the starting price or an unlocked 5S will be $649.“In my opinion, the selling point o the 5S is the addition o the fin-gerprint scanner and the new pro-cessor. Te A7 chip probably eels way aster than the 5,” Gregory Leung, a junior rom Hong Kong, said. Leung did not expect to get the iPhone 5S right away, but he said that the 5S is the true iPhone out o the two that were re-leased.Te iP-hone 5C will be available starting at $99 under a two-year contract. While there is much spec-ulation as to what the “C” means, it definitely doesn’t stand or cheap; an unlocked no-contract version o the phone will start at $549, according to Apple. It does not contain many o the key eatures o the iPhone 5S but is available in five colors: green, blue, yellow, pink and white.“Te 5C is kind o dumb, since all you’re paying or is really just an iPhone 5 with color,” Karynn Glover, a sophomore rom Olathe, said about the unveiling. Glover claimed that she is much more ex-cited about iOS 7, the new operat-ing system that will be released on September 18.Te update will include phone, Faceime and message blocking; an improved version o Siri; auto-matic app updates; a new display system; Apple’s AirDrop and other eatures. iOS 7 will be available or the iPhone 4 and later, iPad 2, iPad Mini, and iPod touch. Both o the iPhones will be avail-able or purchase on September 20.
— Edited by Sarah Kramer 
Lawrence is the ninth smart-est city in the United States, ac-cording to Lumosity, an online brain training and neuroscience research company. Te San Fran-cisco-based company compiled an aggregate score o their users’ results in games considered to be brain training, using their geoloca-tion to track their position.Te rankings were based off o five determinants: Speed, At-tention, Flexibility, Memory and Problem Solving. O the five cate-gories, Lawrence ranked eighth in attention but only 35 in memory, their lowest rank-ing.“Te games are derived rom com-ponents o an in-telligence test,” said Susan Kemper, a Roberts distin-guished proessor o psychology at the University. “Tey take what’s already out there on these tests, and turn them into games.”According to the company’s web-site, the games reflect user intelli-gence, but are also designed to improve core cogni-tive unctions among its us-ers. Lawrence saw a signi-icant rise in the rankings in 2013, afer not placing in the op 25 last year.“I eel like Lawrence definitely deserves a place among the smart-est cities in the nation,” Jared War-ren, a senior rom Wichita, said. “KU has some o the best academ-ic programs and proessors any-where.”In general, college towns across the nation were well-represented in the list, as the op 10 was entire-ly composed o cities that are cen-trally located around a major uni- versity. Kemper says this is a result o more awareness and concern or brain upkeep in these areas.“Students are very worried about staying ahead, always looking or the edge,” Kemper said. “College towns also bring many other peo-ple that are concerned about cog-nitive perormance, and have an increased overall awareness o the effects o aging on cognition.”Lawrence was one o our cities in Kansas to appear on the list, with opeka ranking 96, Wichita appearing at 211, and Salina at 338.
— Edited by Sarah Kramer 
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2013THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSANPAGE 3A
POLICE REPORTS
Today is the 147th anniversary of the first day of classes at KU. They were held in Old North College, which was located just south of GSP residence hall. There is a small monument to the building where it once stood.A 28-year-old female was arrested yesterday on the 600 block of Iowa under suspicion of possessing drug paraphernalia and contraband substance. A $7,000 bond was paid.A 26-year-old female was arrested yesterday on the 1800 block of West 27th Street on suspicion of criminal property damage. A $250 bond was paid. A 31-year-old male was arrested Tuesday on the 1700 block of Tennessee Street on suspicion of domestic battery. No bond was posted.A 26-year-old was arrested Tuesday on the 900 block of Iowa Street on suspicion of operating under the influence. A $500 bond was paid.
Information based on the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office booking recap.
 0 9.1 4.1 3
 sa v e  $ 5  w/ c o d e  “ C O L O R K U1 3 ”
 S IG N  U P @  T h eCo lo r Run.co m
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RECYCLE,RECYCLE,RECYCLE,RECYCLE.
JOSE MEDRANO
 jmedrano@kansan.com 
TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide product marketing, speaks on stage during the introduction of the new iPhone 5C and 5S in Cupertino, Calif., on Tuesday.
“... the selling point of the 5S is the addition of the fingerprint scanner and the new processor.”
GREGORY LEUNGHong Kong junior
Apple reveals new iPhones, colorful options 
Lumosity ranks Lawrence 9th smartest city in US
NATIONAL
KYLE PAPPAS
kpappas@kansan.com 
“KU has some of the best academic programs and professors anywhere.”
 JARED WARRENWichita senior

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