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When Jonathan Mathews, a healthy, active duty Air National Guardsman, was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 2010, he and his wife, Sharilyn, were shocked. After his cancer was declared in remission, they thought he was in the clear. Two years later, his doctors discovered a Hodgkin lymphoma mass in his chest. A marrow donor’s sacrifice will help Jonathan through his chemotherapy treatment this March.The couple has organized a mar-row donor registration drive today in the Traditions Area on the fourth floor of the Kansas Union from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registrants from today’s donor drive may be a match for cancer patients like Jonathan who are in need of healthy marrow to get their immune systems work-ing again.“It’s opened my eyes,” Sharilyn said. “I never thought of being on a registry. I didn’t even know a reg-istry existed for this kind of stuff. I never thought of cancer because it never affected me before.”Jonathan’s che-motherapy and treatment regimen will require him to receive a stem cell transplant. Be the Match, a reg-istry run by the National Marrow Donor Program, lists 9.5 poten-tial donors. Only two registered individuals match Jonathan’s DNA chromosomes, and both are inter-national donors.“This could happen to anybody,” Sharilyn said. “You don’t think that someone that’s young—that’s 22—is going to get cancer and then need a stem cell transplant—twice. It really can happen to anybody, no matter how healthy you are.”Annually, 53,000 people are diag-nosed with either Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Registering as a potential donor, Sharilyn realized, is a simple act that could potentially save a life.“At first, I really thought that no one’s going to care,” Sharilyn said. “But we’re just one of many families that are going through the exact same thing.Potential donors must be between 18 and 44 years old. Registration requires legal identification such as a driver’s license or passport, filling out a small amount of paperwork and a Q-tip swab of the inside of the cheek.The donor and patient must have the same human leukocyte antigen tissue type. Fundraising will take care of the lab fees, which cost $100 to check each potential donor for an exact chromosomal match. Between collecting donations online and fundraisers at a church at Jonathan’s hometown in Lecompton and at UnderGround Lab Fitness, the Mathews have already raised more than $5,100. Another fundraiser is scheduled for next month.Sharilyn’s fundraising goal is to raise more money than the number of people that register to donate so that any additional funds can help another registra-tion drive down the road. She’s hoping to reg-ister as many potential donors as possible, since the National Marrow Donor Program can financially back up the registra-tion drive.“You’re already putting your name on a list to save a life, the least we can do is not have you pay a penny,” Sharilyn said.A full sibling has a 50-percent chance to match, but Jonathan’s brother did not match. On average, only one in 540 people who register to donate are found as a match to someone in need.If a donor is found to match, he or she may be asked to donate mar-row or peripheral blood stem cells. Marrow donation is a surgical pro-cedure requiring general or regional anesthesia where a doctor makes a few incisions and uses a needle to collect bone marrow from the pelvic bone. The donor may experi-ence discomfort or side effects for a few days to a few weeks after the procedure.Peripheral blood stem cell dona-tion does not require surgery or anesthesia. Before the procedure, the donor receives a shot of fil-grastim, a prescription drug that helps the body produce white blood cells, which creates extra stem cells that seep into the bloodstream. The donor then goes to a hospital where blood is drawn from one arm, run through a machine to separate the platelets that contain the extra stem cells and pumped back in through the other arm. This procedure is similar to donating blood plasma and takes about five hours and could be spread over two days.The donating process is largely anonymous. Some centers allow direct contact between patient and donor, but only after one year or more has passed.“Someone will greatly appreciate your donation,” Jonathan said.During his first battle with can-cer, Jonathan underwent an autolo-gous stem cell transplant in Sept. 2010. Essentially, Jonathan donated peripheral blood stem cells for him-self a month before his treatment and was injected with his own stem cells to restart his immune system during chemotherapy.When his immune system is frag-ile after he receives a peripheral blood stem cell donation in conjunc-tion with chemotherapy and pos-sibly radiation therapy this March, Jonathan will have to be in isolation. He’ll be staying at Hope Lodge, a free housing facility sponsored by the American Cancer Society for patients receiving treatment in Kansas City, and receiving treatment from the Cancer Treatment Center at KU Medical Center’s Westwood Campus. While Jonathan is taking a break from classes this semester for treatment, with only nine credit hours left before he receives his bachelor’s, Sharilyn will try to work with her professors to balance her pre-nursing program with caring for her husband and two sons.Jonathan’s cancer fight is covered through military medical insur-ance—both he and Sharilyn joined the Air National Guard in 2006. They’ve found support through cancer programs and fellow survi- vors who have reached out to them in the recent months.“Two years ago, we would get a gas card for gas from the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society,” Sharilyn said. “The money that people raise actually does get to people like us and families that are going through cancer and chemo. You never know when it’s going to hit your life or your family.”Now that cancer has affected their lives, they hope to help others get through similar struggles.“We plan on hopefully doing these kinds of events regularly, turning them into annual events somehow—if we can handle it,” Jonathan said.To donate to the registration drive, visit the Mathews’ page at bethematchfoundation.org.
— Edited by Elise Reuter 
 Volume 125 Issue 66
kansan.com
 Monday, February 4, 2013
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
FIGHTING FOR A FUTURE
WHAT:
 Bone marrow registration drive
WHEN:
 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
WHERE:
 Kansas Union
KUnited and Ad Astra, the coali-tions running in the Student Senate elections in April, both hosted their kickoff parties at The Burger Stand, 803 Massachusetts St., last week.Topeka senior Brandon Woodard, KUnited’s 2013 presi-dential candidate, said about 80 people showed up to their kickoff party last Wednesday. Woodard said this was more of a meet-and- greet because KUnited has its regu-lar business meetings on Sundays. “It was nice to see each other in a social environment,” Woodard said.Blaine Bengtson, a junior from Salina, is KUnited’s 2013 vice presi-dential candidate. He is a College of Liberal Arts and Sciences senator and director of Recycle and Blue KU, a past KUnited platform and Student Senate’s recycling program on football game days. Bengtson said Student Senate has incredible opportunities every year to affect students on a larger scale.“The experience of giving back to KU at that level is something I wanted to do, and serving as vice president will give me that oppor-tunity,” Bengtson said.KUnited has been brainstorming ideas and formulating their plat-forms for the upcoming election in the spring.Ad Astra’s presidential candidate for next year, Marcus Tetweiller, is a junior from Paola. He is serving as transportation coordinator for the University this year. Tetweiller said Ad Astra has been working on outreach with student groups that are already involved on campus, but not necessarily with Student Senate.“It’s been a positive process of laying the ground work so far,” Tetweiller said.Emma Halling, a junior from Elkhart, Ind., is running as Ad Astra’s 2013 vice president. She is serving as Student Senate’s associate finance senator this year. Halling said about 30 people showed up to their kickoff party at The Burger Stand on Jan. 27. Halling said they started brain-storming platforms and ideas at the kickoff party. One of Ad Astra’s main goals is to have a sense of transpar-ency across the board. Presidential candidate Marcus Tetweiller said regardless of how much experience a member has had, they should never hesitate to speak up.“We have people in our coalition with great ideas to put into action on campus,” Tetweiller said.
— Edited by Julie Etzler 
EMILY DONOVAN
edonovan@kansan.com 
HANNAH BARLING
hbarling@kansan.com 
SENATE
Coalitions prepare for election season, host kickoff parties 
CONTRIBUTED PHTOTO
 Jonathan Mathews poses for a family photo with his wife, Sharilyn, and two children. Mathews was diagonosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 2010. He was declared in remission, but doctors discovered that he had a Hodgkin lymphoma mass in his chest last year.
Student organizes marrow donor drive in light of husband’s diagnosis
the student voice since 1904
“We’re just one of the many families that are going through the exact same thing.”
SHARILYN MATHEWSWife of Jonathan Mathews
 HOW TO HELP
ALL THE SINGLE LADIESTURN TO PAGE 5
 
OPEKA — A proposed amendment to the Kansas Con-stitution designed to stymie a pending education unding law-suit won’t end the litigation and could ace its own legal chal-lenge, a lawyer or the students and public school districts suing the state says.Attorney John Robb criticizes the proposal as a “power play” by conservative Republican legisla-tors upset with past Kansas Su-preme Court rulings that the state wasn’t spending enough money on its public schools. Te mea-sure would add a new sentence to the constitution’s education article, declaring that the Legis-lature has the exclusive power to set spending on schools.Te GOP-dominated Senate Judiciary Committee plans to have hearings later this month on the proposed amendment. It was introduced last week, less than a month afer a three-judge panel in Shawnee County ruled that the state isn’t meeting its con-stitutional obligation to suitably und schools. Legislators would have to boost annual spending by at least $440 million to comply.But Robb, rom Newton, said even i lawmakers put the mea-sure on the ballot and voters approve it, his clients still have legal issues to pursue, including whether legislators were arbitrary in their decisions about school unding. Robb represents 32 stu-dents, their parents and guard-ians and the Wichita, Hutchin-son, Dodge City and Kansas City, Kan., school districts.Robb also said the proposed statement explaining the mea-sure or voters is so misleading — and, in his mind, designed to push them to approve it — that it opens the measure to being invalidated by the state Supreme Court. Robb did not rule out his clients filing such a challenge i the measure is placed on the bal-lot or even afer its approval by  voters.“Te Legislature ought to be ocused on what’s good or kids and not ocused on this power play over who is the supreme decision-maker,” Robb told Te Associated Press in an interview. “Tey’re trying to undamentally change our system o govern-ment in Kansas.”Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Jeff King, an Indepen-dence Republican who helped draf the proposed amendment, was skeptical that it’s vulnerable to a potential legal challenge. He said the amendment, i adopted, would prevent the courts rom stepping into decisions that the constitution meant to reserve or elected officials.“Whether the Legislature is making suitable provision or the financing o education rests in the hearts and minds o Kan-sas voters and at the ballot box,” King said.Te education article says that the Legislature shall “make suit-able provision or finance” or the state’s “educational interests.” Te proposed amendment would add a new sentence saying, “Te financing o the educational in-terests o the state is exclusively a legislative power” and “shall be established solely by the Legisla-ture.”A proposed constitutional change must be adopted by two-thirds majorities in both cham-bers and approved by a simple majority o voters in a statewide election. Supporters hope the measure will be on the ballot no later than the August 2014 pri-mary.Te state Supreme Court has said the Legislature is consti-tutionally obligated to finance a suitable education or every child, suggesting in 2005 and 2006 rulings that the state could ace continual increases in spend-ing. Lawmakers dramatically in-creased spending on schools a-ter those rulings but backed away rom their promises during the Great Recession, prompting the lawsuit by Robb’s clients.Te Shawnee County ruling cited the Legislature’s duty under the education article in saying that current school unding is in-adequate. Te state has appealed it, and it’s not clear how quickly the Supreme Court will rule.But Robb noted that the lower court panel didn’t decide claims that lawmakers were arbitrary in the past or that their actions discriminated against some stu-dents. Te proposed amendment, i adopted, “isn’t going to make this lawsuit go away,” Robb said.“It will impact this lawsuit, but it won’t resolve it,” he said.But King, an attorney who also serves as Senate vice president, said the state’s courts don’t typi-cally order additional spending to remedy the other issues Robb’s clients raise.“We are letting the voters de-cide who has final say over ap-propriations or schools,” King said.
PAGE 2
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
weather,
 Jay?
Clear. Winds from the SW at 10 to 15 mph
Tuesday
Warmth makes a comeback.
HI: 57LO: 32
Clear. Winds from the SSE at 10 to 15 mph.
Wednesday
Another beautiful day.
HI: 61LO: 36
Overcast with a chance of rain in the morning, then clear. Winds from the NNW at 10 to 15 mph.
Thursday
A fine day minus the clouds.
HI: 54LO: 32
Forecaster: weatherunderground.com
 What’s the
CALENDAR
Thursday, Feb. 7Tuesday, Feb. 5Wednesday, Feb. 6Monday, Feb. 4
WHAT
: Taking Back Mondays
WHERE
: Bottleneck
WHEN
: 8 p.m.
ABOUT
: Sovereign States, a punk-rock group, encourages the crowd to join them on stage and sing along in this karaoke-style show.
WHAT
: Karaoke Costume Night
WHERE
: Jazzhaus
WHEN
: 10 p.m.
ABOUT
: Still craving more karaoke? Pick a costume and show off your vocal skills. Featuring MCs Tanya McNaughty and Jadey McJuicy.
WHAT
: Casbah Video Gamer Night
WHERE
: Burger Stand at the Casbah
WHEN
: 8 p.m.
ABOUT
: If you’re feeling nostalgic for your old-school gamer days, come play classic video games on Nintendo 64, Super NES and Sega Genesis.
WHAT
: Inspiring MLK: The Mentorship of Benjamin Elijah Mays
WHERE
: Dole Institute of Politics
WHEN
: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
ABOUT
: In honor of Black History Month, Prof. Randal Maurice Jelks will discuss the importance of Benjamin Elijah Mays in the civil rights move-ment.
WHAT
: Spring Study Abroad Affair
WHERE
: Kansas Union
WHEN
: 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
ABOUT
: Explore your study abroad op-tions, which includes countries such as Spain, Ireland and Australia, and meet with program coordinators and past participants.
WHAT
: Faith Forum: Rooted in Faith, Working for the Earth
WHERE
: Ecumenical Campus Minis-tries
WHEN
: 6:30 to 8 p.m.
ABOUT
: Rachel Myslivy, program director of the Climate and Energy Project, discusses how faith and being good to the earth intertwine. People of all faiths welcome.
WHAT
: Free HIV Testing
WHERE
: Kansas Union
WHEN
: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
ABOUT
: The Douglas County AIDS Project will host free HIV testing in honor of National Black HIV Aware-ness Day. All community members are encouraged to attend.
WHAT
: Tea at Three
WHERE
: Kansas Union
WHEN
: 3 to 4 p.m.
ABOUT
: Enjoy some free tea and cook-ies. Extra points if you can speak with a British accent.
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Hannah Wise
Managing editors
Sarah McCabeNikki Wentling
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTBusiness manager
Elise Farrington
Sales manager
 Jacob Snider
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Allison Kohn
Associate news editor
 Joanna Hlavacek
Sports editor
Pat Strathman
Associate sports editor
Trevor Graff
Entertainment editor
Laken Rapier
Copy chiefs
Megan HinmanTaylor LewisBrian Sisk
Design chiefs
Ryan BenedickKatie Kutsko
Designers
Trey ConradSarah Jacobs
Opinion editor
Dylan Lysen
Photo editor
Ashleigh Lee
Special sections editor
Kayla Banzet
Web editor
Natalie Parker
ADVISERS
 
General manager and news adviser
Malcolm Gibson
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
Contact Us
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: UDK_NewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansan
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
2000 Dole Human Developement Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
Summer study abroad info fair at Union
The Office of Study Abroad will host its spring fair on Wednesday. It will be in the Kansas Union on the fourth floor lobby from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The fair will promote summer study abroad op-tions. Information about financial aid and scholarships will also be available.“Even if you’re not interested in doing it right now, it’s never too early to start planning and seeing about those opportunities,” said Robert Lopez, outreach coordinator for the Office of Study Abroad.Other departments, including the Global Awareness Program, Global Partners, the Passport Office and the Peace Corps will also offer information about their respective departments throughout the day.The deadline for summer study abroad applications is March 1. The internship deadline is Feb. 11. To complete the application pro-cess, students must apply online at studyabroad.ku.edu.
— Elly Grimm 
Voter registration deadline Tuesday
Douglas County elections are less than a month away. Primary elec-tions are on Feb. 26, and the voter registration deadline for residents is Tuesday, Feb. 5. Although students can print an online registration form and mail it in, undergraduate student Amber McArthur hopes to encourage more students to register, making the pro-cess even easier for students. She will host a voter registration drive in front of Wescoe Hall at noon on Feb. 4. Students need only a driver’s license to register.
— Alyssa Scott 
CAMPUSEDUCATIONPOLITICS
Amendment would allow legislature to set school funding 
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kansas state Sen. Julia Lynn, right, an Olathe Republican, asks questions about a proposed amendment to the state constitution to change how appellate court members are selected, as Sen. David Haley, a Kansas City Democrat, watches during a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting last Thursday.
@
WANT TO KNOW MORE?
go to www.kansan.com or follow us on Twitter @UDK_news 
 MONDA
 40
WINGS 
2288 IOWA ST. 785.856.7364
340 Fraser | 864-4121
www.psych.ku.edu/ psychological_clinic/ 
Counseling Services for
Lawrence & KU
�    
� 
 �   
�           �        � �                
 
PAGE 3THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013
Until the early 1940s, only unmarried women were admitted to the Univer-sity’s nursing school, and they had to remain single until they completed the program.
Information based on the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office booking recap.
A 19-year-old male was arrested Saturday on the 1000 block of Ver-mont Street under suspicion of uri-nating or defecating in public, inter-fering with an officer performing his duties, possession, purchase or con-sumption of alcohol by a minor and consumption or possession of liquor in public. A $400 bond was paid.A 20-year-old male was arrested Saturday on the 1700 block of Mas-sachusetts Street under suspicion of driving while intoxicated. A $250 bond was paid.A 22-year-old male was arrested Saturday on the 1600 block of Indi-ana Street under suspicion of oper-ating a vehicle under the influence. A $500 bond was paid.A 21-year-old male was arrested Saturday on the 900 block of 24th Street under suspicion of criminal possession of a firearm. A $2,000 bond was paid.A 21-year-old male was arrested Sunday on K10 east of 2200nd Road under suspicion of driving while in-toxicated. A $250 bond was paid.
— Emily Donovan 
POLICE REPORTS
 
@
WANT TO KNOW MORE?
go to www.kansan.com or follow us on Twitter @UDK_news 
POLITICS
Speakers call for an end to slavery, trafficking 
JOE DAUGHERTY
 jdaugherty@kansan.com 
EMILY WITTLER/KANSAN
Gov. Sam Brownback speaks to attendants of the Conference on Slavery and Human Trafficking at the Union last Thursday. The Institute for Policy & Social Research at the University of Kansas hosted the conference.
At the Kansas conference on Slavery and Human raffick-ing, Gov. Sam Brownback said he hopes Kansas becomes a national leader in the fight against slavery and human trafficking.Gov. Brownback co-sponsored the two-day conference with several other organizations last Tursday and Fri-day in the Kansas Union. Te confer-ence included the keynote speaker Kevin Bales on Tursday, who is considered to be one of the world’s foremost experts on modern slavery.Participants were also given the chance to split into groups to discuss different aspects of human trafficking.Allison Colburn, senior from Manhattan, said she was drawn to the conference because she has always been interested in the sub- ject and is traveling to Dubai in a month to learn more about human trafficking of women.Law student Doug Coe said he came to the conference because he has been passionate about the topic of modern day slavery for a number of years. He said shaking hands with Bales was a highlight of the conference.“Kevin Bales really challenged me in a lot of ways to start thinking of ways we can address the issue from an academic standpoint as well as from the front lines,” Coe said. “I was always more about the front lines type of work and his speech really made me think.”In his presentation, Bales said he thinks modern day slavery can be ended. However, he calls for unified action before this can be-come reality.
— Edited by Allison Kohn
“...His speech really made me think.”
DOUG COElaw student
MEDIA
Fort Hays State newspaper discontinues print edition
ASSOCIATED PRESS
HAYS, Kan.—he student newspaper at Fort Hays State University has halted its print edition after its funding was slashed.“We can’t publish,” said Molly Walter, editor-in-chief of the newspaper, called the University Leader. “here’s no funds.”he Hays Daily News reports that the Student Government Association voted last spring to cut funding to $19,750 from $32,250. Student government leaders mentioned readership as an issue.he last print issue was pub-lished hursday. For the foresee-able future, the student journal-ists will produce news online only.In 2003, the Student Govern-ment Association also pulled the plug on funding for the Reveille, the university’s yearbook.Larry Gould, the university’s provost and chief academic of-ficer, said the university doesn’t want to eliminate the Leader, but “wanted it tied back into aca-demic affairs.”Before 2003, the Leader was a recognized student organization overseen by student affairs. Stu-dents working on the newspa-per could enroll in a one-hour lab class run through the communication department and earn academic credit, said Linn Ann Huntington, professor and director of journalism.Huntington served as Leader adviser from 1990 until 2003, when the Leader lab was taken out of the academic program and became “just an extracur-ricular activity.” hat meant stu-dents no longer got academic credit.“It has been a free-standing program with no connection to the academic program since that time,” Hun-tington said.University officials are putting together a task force to discuss what should happen next. Gould said he’s looking forward to the process of crafting a “better edu-cation experience” for students.Meanwhile, the Leader staff is requesting $75,000 for the up-coming school year and would like to bring the publication back in the fall, Walter said.
“We can’t publish. There’s no funds.”
MOLLY WALTEREditor-in-chief of the University Leader
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Common symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) include:
      
The Cotton-O’Neil Clinical Research Center at Stormont-Vail Behavioral Health is conducting a clinical research study on GAD.
                            
Eligible participants of the study receive:
                      
For more information about this study, call (785) 270-4636.
Do you suffer from
Generalized Anxiety Disorder?
Inspiring MLK: The Mentorship o Benjamin Elijah Mays
with KU Proessor Randal Maurice Jelks
Tuesday, Feb. 5 at 7:30 p.m.
A Black History Month program, Jelks will discuss the man Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. called his “spiritual and intellectual ather.” is program contains a book sale and signing o Jelks’ book,
Benjamin Elijah Mays, Schoolmaster of the Movement 
.
KPR’s 60th Anniversary: An Evening with Scott Horsley
Tuesday, March 12 at 7:30 p.m
As part o Kansas Public Radio’s 60th anniversary celebration, we’re highlighting the important role news coverage has played in the station’s history. To showcase our partnership with NPR, we’ll turn the tables on NPR White House Correspondent Scott Horsley as he is interviewed regarding the 2012 presidential campaign.
Leadership & Globalization in Sports Series
Reinventing the Empirewith Sporting KC’s CEO/Co-owner Robb Heineman
Tuesday, March 5 at 7:30 p.m.
Find out how Robb Heineman combined innovative marketing, technology and an kinship to propel Sporting KC into a Major League Soccer powerhouse in America, with other world teams hot to ollow in his ootsteps and turn the traditional sports business model on its head.
Empowering and Sustaining Malawi: Arica Windmill Project
with John DrakeTuesday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m.
Sustainable agriculture, community development and healthy drinking water are the undamental needs that Arica Windmill Project provides Malawian armers today. Don’t miss this inspiring story o AWP’s quest to educate and empower a country struggling to thrive. Drake will discuss AWP and what you can do to get involved.
Study Groups with Spring 2013 Fellow Brigadier General Roosevelt Barfeld
U.S. Engagement: Political-Military Afairs
Integrating diplomacy and deense and orging international security partnerships makes political-military afairs a timeless political topic. Spring 2013 Fellow, Briga-dier General Roosevelt Bareld (Ret.), will explore the denitions, perspectives and stakeholders responsible or political-military strategy.
4:00-5:30 p.m. WednesdaysFeb. 13, 20, 27, March 6, 13, 27 & April 3
TAKE YOUR EDUCATION TO THE NEXT LEVEL
 
 All programs are free, open to the public and held at the Dole Institute
e Dole Institute of Politics is located on West Campus, next to the Lied Center
www.DoleInstitute.org785.864.4900Facebook/Twitter
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