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proportional reasoning unit 6-8

proportional reasoning unit 6-8

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Published by bgeller4936
June 10, 2008

page 1

Facilitator Notes Professional Development: K­8 Mathematics Standards Grades 6­8: Proportional Reasoning
1. OSPI is pleased to provide materials to use in teacher professional development sessions about the K­8 Mathematics Standards that were  approved by the State Board of Education on April 28, 2008.  These materials provide a structure for two full days focused on helping 6­ 8 teachers understand the critic
June 10, 2008

page 1

Facilitator Notes Professional Development: K­8 Mathematics Standards Grades 6­8: Proportional Reasoning
1. OSPI is pleased to provide materials to use in teacher professional development sessions about the K­8 Mathematics Standards that were  approved by the State Board of Education on April 28, 2008.  These materials provide a structure for two full days focused on helping 6­ 8 teachers understand the critic

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 June 10, 2008 page 1
Facilitator NotesProfessional Development: K-8 Mathematics StandardsGrades 6-8: Proportional Reasoning
1. OSPI is pleased to provide materials to use in teacher professional development sessions about the
 K-8 Mathematics Standards
that wereapproved by the State Board of Education on April 28, 2008. These materials provide a structure for two full days focused on
helping 6-8 teachers understand the critical content embedded in these Standards
. We hope that these materials will be used by local schoolsand school districts, education service districts, and university teacher educators to help inservice and preservice teachers deepen theirpersonal understanding of key mathematics ideas. Feedback about the effectiveness of the materials and ways to improve them can besent to OSPI so improvements can be made.2. The goal of these professional development sessions is to help participants deepen their personal understanding of some of themathematics embedded in the K-8 Mathematics Standards. With deeper understanding, teachers will be better able to (a) understandstudents’ mathematics thinking, (b) ask targeted clarifying and probing questions, and (c) choose or modify mathematics tasks in order tohelp students learn more.3. The problem sets are presented to participants on separate “activity pages.” Sometimes you will want participants to work on all theproblems in a set, and then you will lead a debriefing of each of the problems. Sometimes you will want participants to work onproblems sequentially so that you can debrief each problem in order. The choice will depend on the particular problem set, yourpreferences about facilitating discussions, and the needs of the particular group of participants you are working with.4. Some of the problems may be appropriate for students to complete, but other problems are intended ONLY as work for the participants asadult learners. After participants have solved problems, you might want to discuss which ones would be appropriate for students. Thereare reflections after each problem set that can help participants begin to think about how knowledge of the underlying mathematics ideascan help them plan more effective instruction for students.5. Encourage participants to discuss their thinking with partners. This will help participants develop fluent language about the relevantmathematics ideas. Sometimes you may choose to ask participants to work independently before talking with partners, but sometimesyou may choose to ask participants to work immediately with partners. Always allow sufficient time for participants to work on aproblem set (or on individual problems) before you begin the debriefing. Participants are more likely to contribute to the discussion if 
 
 June 10, 2008 page 2
they are confident about their answers and about their solution strategies. This will also model that it is important to give students ampletime to work on a problem before discussing answers to that problem.6. Although there is no explicit attention to instructional practice in these content professional development sessions, discussing implicationsfor teaching will help deepen participants’ own understanding. You are encouraged to tailor those discussions to the needs of each groupof participants. For example, if participants are all using a common set of curriculum materials, you may want to lead some discussionsrelated to those materials. Be careful, however, not to lose the emphasis on deepening participants’ knowledge of mathematics.7. Approximate times are given for each problem set, but you will need to create an agenda that responds to the specific parameters of howyou are working with participants. For example, you might schedule these sessions on two consecutive days or you might schedule themacross four half-days. Extra time will be needed for the Reflection at the end of the Problem Sets. There may be too many problems forparticipants to complete comfortably in a two-day session, so you need to think carefully about which problems you ask participants tosolve in each Problem Set. Alternately, you may choose to omit some Problem Sets completely.
Logistics
These professional development materials were designed with the following assumptions about logistics for the meetings.1. Participants will primarily be classroom teachers of mathematics from grades 6-8. (There are different sets of problems for teachersfrom grades K-2 and 3-5.) Modifications may need to be made if there are significant numbers of ELL teachers or special educationteachers.2. Participants should be seated at tables of 3-6 people each.
Discussions among participants are strongly encouraged
.3. The problem sets need to be copied prior to the start of the sessions. You will also need a computer and projector for display of theslides, chart paper and markers, graph paper, rulers, adding machine tape, and enough space for small groups of participants to work comfortably. A document camera might also be useful.
The materials were developed by a team of Washington educators:Kathryn Absten, ESD 114 George Bright, OSP Jewel Brumley, Yakima School District Boo Drury, OSP Andrea English, Arlington School District Karrin Lewis, OSPI 
 
 June 10, 2008 page 3
 Rosalyn O’Donnell, Ellensburg School District David Thielk, Central Kitsap School District  Numerous other people from Washington and from across the nation, provided comments about various drafts of these materials. We greatlyappreciate all of their help.Publication date: June 10, 2008

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