Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
On the Color Line

On the Color Line

Ratings: (0)|Views: 4|Likes:
Published by Ryan Webster
Racism in the Heart of America
Racism in the Heart of America

More info:

Published by: Ryan Webster on Nov 21, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/12/2014

pdf

text

original

 
DOWNTOWN KANSAS CITY JOURNAL 
 
Page
1
 of
6
 
Bosjesman Family from Ratzel’s History
 of Mankind
 
ON THE COLOR LINE
 by David Arthur Walters KANSAS CITY
I have been writing about racial issues lately because when reading the local papers I discovered it was Black History Month, and then I noticed the Color Line drawn by a prominent "African-American" Kansas Citian, Lewis W. Diuguid, member of the Editorial Board of
The Kansas City Star 
, in the form of several opinion articles celebrating Black History Month. In one of those columns he complained about the Color Line, and in another he prophesied that scientific progress and miscegenation would cause the Color Line to vanish.
 
DOWNTOWN KANSAS CITY JOURNAL 
 
Page
2
 of
6
 
Lewis wondered why he received so much negative email from his readers, many of whom happen to be morons like myself. I use the term 'moron' in the loose sense, of 'fool.' I am a fool for being attracted to an absurd discourse about something modern science proves does not really exist, or, if it does, is really not noticeable although almost everyone thinks it is obvious; to wit, race, the spurious basis for racism; that is, the idea that there are several human races instead of one animal subspecies, human so-called. One might as well argue about nothing at all than to argue about something that does not exist, to say, "There is no such thing as race, but African-Americans are being discriminated against by racists." But when one fool draws a line, other fools are bound to toe it. And Lewis did draw the Color Line when he wrote about Black History Month, implying that the rest of the months are white or are at least up for grabs by whites, reds, yellows and greens, all of whom had better watch out and not step on black toes or use the Latin term for 'black' during Black History Month. Of course all the months were hogged by whites until a black month was carved out, but never mind! By the way, I am not a racist nor am I a Negrophile. I am a colorist with an aesthetic preference for blacks and browns. Unlike Moses' sister, I am fond of that Kush woman, whom I believe was actually a priestess of Isis. Yes, my Isis is Nubian, the dazzling black virgin beauty who was, in the form of black basalt, much admired along the Nile up north in fertile Black Land, where Nubians ruled as pharaohs for a century or so
 Nubians are credited with forming the first political state known to humankind. Space, as we know, is the form of Isis, just as Space is the Robe of her Time-destroying sister in Bharata, Siva's wife Sakti when in her darker mood; I mean the one and only Black Mama, Kali Ma. That is just for
 
DOWNTOWN KANSAS CITY JOURNAL 
 
Page
3
 of
6
 
beginners. In any event, I am for the underdog wherever applicable, although I admit that I was slightly embarrassedwhen the lights came on after the Black Panther movie; several members of the audience pointed at me and laughed: I was the only white man in the theater, and I had been cheering the revolutionaries throughout the movie. During Black History Month, black Americans or Negro Americans are respectfully referred to as hyphenated-Americans: African-Americans. An "unidentified" Negro man was found dead this winter, frozen stiff in a Kansas City back yard. The media referred to him as an 'African-American.' Whereupon I wondered, if the deceased is "unidentified," how do they know he is an African-American? Did they mean he is black? There are several nations and tribes in Africa, and not all Africans are black. If he is an African, how can he be an American at the same time? Slavery was abolished some time ago. Did he immigrate to America from Africa, or vice versa? Well, all Americans are African if the human race originated in Africa, but we do not call ourselves African-American. In fact immigrants do not like to be hyphenated in America, so why denigrate people who have really immigrated from Africa? Or is it that 'African-Americans' want to return to Africa as did the Liberians? Or maybe they do not like America at all; but then why be chained to it with a hyphen? Why not be one's own nation, a Nation of Islam? But why have a nation limited by religion? And why, when the television stations report on crime, do they refer to Negro criminals as "black", yet others are "African-Americans?" Of course enlightened people know the various answers to all of these questions, for the questions have been asked and answered time and time again. Most Americans do respect the "African-American" culture whatever it may be called. We

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->