Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
11-21-13

11-21-13

Ratings: (0)|Views: 108 |Likes:

More info:

Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Nov 21, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/22/2013

pdf

text

original

 
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 3BCROSSWORD 5ACRYPTOQUIPS 5AOPINION 4ASPORTS 1BSUDOKU 5A
Rain. 100 percent chance of rain. Wind NE at 15 mph.
Friday is the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination.
IndexDon’t forgetToday’s Weather
Baby got rain.
HI: 50LO: 29
By Trevor Graff 
tgraff@kansan.com
Kansan apologizes for fabrication
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
WEEKEND
 
Erstwhile astronomy
Science lab will not be offered for second straight semester
GRAPHIC BY COLE ANNEBERG/KANSANGEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
PAGE 3A
 P A G E  7 A
 Volume 126 Issue 51
kansan.com
 Thursday, November 21, 2013
EDITORIAL
 T W E E T  T R E A T S
 fi      
O
n uesday, we learned that an opinion column published on Nov. 4 written by staff opinion columnist Bryenn Bierwirth contained inormation that was repurposed rom a Feb. 1, 2012, column published in Te Guardian. Bierwirth is also an account executive on the Kansan’s advertising staff. Te Kansan column was recently mentioned in a USA oday College story.Afer reading the USA oday story, a concerned journalism graduate brought the similarities in the two columns to my attention. I immediately began investigating the reporting methods used in this and other columns written by Bierwirth to determine the extent o the problem.Te repurposed content came rom the article “op Five Regrets o the Dying,” which Te Guardian published on Feb. 1, 2012. Te content was not copied verbatim, but rather was borrowed and paraphrased, in a manner that online searches could not discover during our editing process. Te methods used in writing this column do not meet the reporting standards that we teach and expect at the Kansan. Te Kansan accepts only act-based reporting, the pursuit o truth in accurate storytelling and a constant standard o integrity in both news and editorial content. Journalism that does not abide by these standards is unacceptable. Te Kansan provides a beginning or  journalists o all callings and with that comes the power and responsibility to provide a sound, undamental start in a hands-on environment.Tis situation does not meet our standards and looking orward, we will be reevaluating the process that allowed this to publish and taking a much deeper look at editorial content.o clariy, the Kansan is editorially independent rom the William Allen White School o Journalism and Mass Communications. We benefit rom the mentorship and guidance o the journalism aculty, but the decision-making process in this case was handled entirely by me as the editor o the newspaper. Te paper is and will continue to be operated independently o the school o journalism. While this is an embarrassing situation, the best way to resolve this issue is to disclose it with you, our readers. Te Kansan has been publishing since 1904, and we embrace the tradition o independent news organizations o correcting our own mistakes. We are holding ourselves to the same standard that we hold others in reporting the news.Afer discussing the situation, Bierwirth submitted his resignation rom his advertising and news staff positions with the Kansan.I would like to take this opportunity to personally apologize to our readers. Looking orward, the Kansan will continue to work to ensure accuracy, the pursuit o truth and the integrity o our content or our audience.
 
Student Senate met last night to discuss and vote on two more elec-tion reorm bills, but beore getting down to business, Senate welcomed a guest speaker rom the Office o Multicultural Affairs.
REFLECTION
Cody Charles, the associate direc-tor o OMA, ocused his speech on conversations, specifically difficult conversations he has had with stu-dents. “I give my time or dynamic con- versations,” Charles said. Afer sharing several stories, he asked senators: “Are you having those dynamic moments, those dy-namic conversations? Do you know the people you are representing?”
MEETING WITH OTHER  BIG 12 SENATES 
 
Moving rom a point o reflection, officers gave their biweekly reports to the senate. Executive staff visited exas Christian University last weekend to meet with other executive staffs rom all the Big 12 schools. Marcus etwiler, student body president, said he was proud to see that KU Student Senate matches up with the best o the best in the Big 12.
ELECTION REFORM: COALITIONS AND CAUCUS 
Tis bill establishes a caucus sys-tem or coalitions to choose their presidential and vice presidential candidates, senators and how they want to be listed on the ballot. Te bill, which can be viewed on-line at Kansan.com, passed with one amendment.
ELECTION REFORM: GENERAL REGULATIONS
yler Childress, one o the au-thors o the bill and senate chie o staff, said the bill’s purpose is to outline the powers o the elections commission to ensure coalitions ollow election rules.“We want to make sure it’s very clear that the elections commission is in charge o this code and they can hold candidates and coalitions accountable,” Childress said. Te bill passed and can be viewed, in ull, online. Full senate will review the final in-stallment o election reorm at the next meeting. Tat bill will ocus on reshman elections, which ollow a different ormat and process than general elections.
— Edited by Jessica Mitchell 
While companies can target their advertisements toward a younger audience by utilizing online tech-nology such as social media, a re-cent study says that these online ads may lead to an increased “culture o intoxication” among young people.Te study, which analyzed how 18- to 25-year-olds reacted to online alcohol advertising, was co-authored by Christine Griffin, a proessor o social psychology at the University o Bath. She believes it’s necessary to conront the types o messages promoted by alcohol advertising targeted towards young people.She says that because these ads make drinking “about un, plea-sure and socializing,” young people might be encouraged to drink at an extreme or dangerously intoxi-cated level. o combat these unsae drinking behaviors, she suggests the development o more regula-tions or online alcohol marketing aimed at this age group.Michael Azbel, a reshman rom Overland Park, agrees that there is a prevalent belie among college students that alcohol is included in the “college culture,” but said that he doesn’t necessarily see online al-cohol advertising as having a large effect on this belie.He said other than a ew ads on Facebook and Youube, he per-sonally hasn’t come across many alcohol advertisements while using social media sites.Rather, he said he’s observed that young people tend to be more a-ected by what their peers are do-ing than by advertisements.“Our riends affect how we think, even by just planting a little idea,” Azbel said. “Social media can be an advertisement in itsel or drinking. It doesn’t even have to be a company or specific prod-uct; it can just be drinking itsel.”Noelle Nelson, an assistant pro-essor o marketing in the KU School o Business, said that ad- vertisements rom companies and the influence o peers can some-times become indistinguishable.“It’s very possible that young peo-ple do not distinguish social media content rom advertisements,” Nel-son said. “I young people don’t see a difference between alcohol ads and social media content, they may misconstrue the content as being endorsed by their peer group.”Both o these actors may have an influence on students’ ideas about alcohol and drinking, said Vanessa Newton.“I think it’s kind o a chicken and egg thing; I’m not sure i advertis-
 
What:
Pizza and Politics: In the Eye of the Beholder
When:
 Noon to 1:15 p.m.
Where:
 Centennial Room, Kansas Union
About:
 Pizza and discussion about creative expression with UTNE Reader editor-in-chief Christian Williams
What:
 Why Radical Connectivity Means the End of Big
When:
 5:30 p.m.
Where:
Spooner Hall, The Commons
About:
Lecture with Nicco Mele on how technology disrupts our lives
What:
Global Entrepreneurship Cele-bration
When:
9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Where:
 Lied Center
About:
Discussions and networking celebrating entrepreneurship
What:
Can Democracy Survive the Digital Age?
When:
10 a.m.
Where:
 Spooner Hall, The Commons
About:
 Discussion with Nicco Mele
What:
Art Cart: Optical Art
When:
 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where:
 Spencer Museum of Art
About:
 Art activity creating foam projects
What:
Student Recital Series: Kaitlin Fahy, Clarinet
When:
 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where:
Murphy Hall, Swarthout Recital Hall
About:
Student recital presented by the School of Music
What:
Art Cart: Optical Art
When:
12 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Where:
 Spencer Museum of Art
About:
 Art activity creating foam projects
What:
School of Music Symphony Orchestra
When:
 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where:
 Lied Center
About:
 Concert presented by the School of Music
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison KohnDylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTBusiness manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren ArmendarizHayley JozwiakElise ReuterMadison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole AnnebergAllyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS Media director and content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013PAGE 2ACONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: KansanNewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
 Jay?
 What’s the
FridaySaturdaySundayHI: 47HI: 40HI: 39LO: 21LO: 18LO: 26
— weather.com 
Cloudy. 20 percent chance of rain. Wind N at 16 mph.
 
Partly cloudy. 20 percent chance of rain. Wind N at 16 mph.Partly cloudy. Zero percent chance of rain. Wind SSE at 8 mph.
I like big clouds.And I cannot lie.You other clouds can’t deny.
Calendar
Sunday, Nov. 24
WHERE HAIR GOES TO
MAN UP
$9.95
with
Student ID
2500 Iowa St Lawrence, KS 66046(785) 841-6640M - F 9 8 Sat 9 6:00pm
 Keeping the
 
 Hawks Rolling
Don’s Auto Center Inc.
 Auto Repair and Machine Shop785.841.4833 11th & Haskell
 Since 1974
Saturday, Nov. 23Friday, Nov. 22Thursday, Nov. 21
SENATE
Students disagree with online alcohol ad study
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com 
Student Senate passes two election reforms 
KAITLYN KLEIN
kklein@kansan.com 
RESEARCH
FRANK WEIRCH/KANSAN
Marcus Tetweiler addresses the assembly during a Senate meeting Wednesday night. The Senate passed two election reforms.
“Our friends affect how we think, even by just planting a little idea.”
MICHAEL AZBELOverland Park freshman
SEE ALCOHOL PAGE 7A
 
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSANPAGE 3A
POLICE REPORTS
It will be 50 years tomorrow since  JFK was assassinated. His brother Robert opened his presidential campaign in 1968 on KU`s campus, and was tragically assassinated just weeks later.
A 46-year-old man was arrested Tuesday on the 3800 block of Shadybrook Drive on suspicion of domestic battery. No bond was posted.A 49-year-old man was arrested Tuesday on the 2500 block of Redbud Lane on suspicion of sexual battery and criminal damage to property. No bond was posted.A 36-year-old man was arrested Tuesday on the 300 block of Stockade Street on suspicion of criminal threat and battery. No bond was posted.
— Katie McBride 
Information based on the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office booking recap.
ALABA
R  AA
FIND US AT
KUALTERNATIVEBREAKS.COMFACEBOOK.COM/KUALBREAKS @KUALBREAKS
A
APPL Y B YNO V. 22!
Follow @KansanNews on Twitter 
WANT NEWS UPDATES ALL DAY LONG?
When the cold creeps in with the changing seasons, students turn on their furnaces without any hesita-tion. But the Kansas Department of Health and Environment wants Kansans to be aware of the invisi-ble danger that comes with heating homes: carbon monoxide.According to a news release from the KDHE and Safe Kids Kansas, the use of fuel burning appliances in the home leads to dangerously high levels of carbon monoxide.Te CDC describes carbon mon-oxide as a colorless, odorless gas that can cause sudden illness or death. It is a major concern during the winter months because the use of fuel-burning ovens, furnaces, space heaters, generators and fire-places that can emit the gas un-beknownst to the user. Prolonged exposure can cause a person to become ill and possibly lose con-sciousness, which can eventually lead to death from the gas.Students should be aware of the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning and should call 911 im-mediately if they think there may be a carbon monoxide leak in their home. Angela German, program direc-tor of the Primary Care Office of the KDHE, said that it’s important for students to know which appli-ances can emit carbon monoxide and take appropriate measures to stop the leaks.“Te main thing is ventilation,” German said. “You need to make sure all your fuel-burning appli-ances are properly ventilated.”Tis is especially important for students living in older homes, as these homes are more likely to have fuel-burning appliances. German says that students worried about their appliances should contact their landlords to make sure every-thing is up to code.“At the very least students should install a CO [carbon monoxide] detector,” German said. Carbon monoxide detectors are available at local hardware stores and stores like Walmart and arget for roughly $20.
— Edited by Jessica Mitchell
HEALTHCAMPUS
ASHLEIGH TIDWELL
atidwell@kansan.com 
• headache• dizziness• weakness• nausea• vomitingchest pain• confusion
SYMPTOMS INCLUDE:
Winter increases threat of carbon monoxide 
HOW TO PREVENT CO POISONING
Prevent CO buildup in the first place - make sure heating appliances are in good working order and use only in well-ventilated areas.Don’t run a car engine in the garage, even with the garage door open. If you need to warm up your vehicle, move it outside first.Install a CO alarm outside every sleeping area, on every level of your home and at least 15 feet away from every fuel-burning appliance.When you check your smoke alarm batteries each month, check the batteries on your CO alarms at the same time – and replace the batteries twice a year.Never use an oven to heat your home.Portable generators must be used outside for proper ventilation. They cannot be used indoors or inside of a garage.Have all gas, oil or coal burning appliances in-spected by a technician every year to ensure they’re working correctly and are properly venti-lated.
For the second semester in a row, the University will not be offering an astronomy lab to fulfill students’ general education lab requirement. Students looking for an alternative to the biology or chemistry lab will once again have to look elsewhere to satisfy their degree stipulations.Barbara Anthony-warog, pro-fessor of physics and astronomy, explained that there were many factors that weighed into the deci-sion to not offer the lab again.“We haven’t had a facility of our own or schedule that we can con-trol for the last 12 years,” said An-thony-warog. “We’ve been using the top level of Memorial Stadium when we’re able to.”Since weather conditions can heavily affect astronomers’ views on celestial objects, having a prop-er location and scheduled time slot to view can be crucial.“It’s hard enough to predict at 3 p.m. or 4 p.m. if you will be able to go outside to use the telescopes,” said Anthony-warog. “Athletics were very nice to let us use their space, but those facilities just aren’t meant for us.”Te lab last had access to proper facilities in 2001, when it was held in Lindley Hall.Te dissipation of the lab affects students looking for a non-tradi-tional lab to fulfill their general ed-ucation requirements.“I have a handful of friends that really struggled with or even had to retake the biology lab,” said Ka-tie Zyskowski, a sophomore from Minneapolis. “I think they should keep as many options for alterna-tive labs as possible.”Anthony-warog said if the lab were to return in the future, it wouldn’t happen without any changes.“We wouldn’t restart it in the way that it was previously offered,” she said. “It’s become increasingly dif-ficult to have a nighttime telescope class on campus, and there’s no short-term plans for a telescope facility that can actually be con-trolled.”Students who are looking to gain hands-on experience with tele-scopes can still do so by attend-ing the Astronomy Associates of Lawrence’s telescope open house, which takes place at Prairie Park once each month. For more infor-mation on specific times and dates, checkout the AAL website.
— Edited by Hannah Barling 
KYLE PAPPAS
kpappas@kansan.com 
Astronomy lab nixed second consecutive semester
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
This photo shows the waning gibbous moon over Lawrence on Nov. 19. While students can no longer take the astronomy class at the University, the Astronomy Associates of Lawrence offer a monthly telescope open house at Prairie Park.
Source: Kansas Department of Health and Environment 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->