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Tommy and the Garden Stakes

Tommy and the Garden Stakes

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Published by Hilding Lindquist
A short story suitable for all ages ... totally "G".
A short story suitable for all ages ... totally "G".

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Published by: Hilding Lindquist on Jul 11, 2007
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/08/2014

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 Tommy And The Garden StakesA Short StoryBy Hilding LindquistCopyright © 2006 by Hilding LindquistPermission for non-profit use with attribution hereby granted byHilding Lindquist, author.Suitable for all ages ... totally "G".
 Author's note
: If you understand the meaning behind this story,that it is the creative pursuit that makes us human, then youunderstand my philosophy of life. If you need a label, I am atranscendental existentialist, but it is all here in this story. –HL
"Grandpa?" The young boy called out to his grandfather as heentered the garage where the old man was working."Yes, Tommy?""Whatcha doin'?""I'm sharpening stakes for the garden.""How come?""Because it's time to plant the garden." Tommy sat down on the wood toolbox against the garage walland watched his grandfather sharpen points onto the ends of Birch sticks with a small hatchet. The old man carefully selected each stick from the unsharpenedpile beside him with his left hand. He positioned it with a slightslant on the chopping block in front of him and chopped away atthe end of the stick with the hatchet in his right hand. As hechopped with his right hand, he slowly rotated the stick with hisleft. Every so often he would pick it up and closely examine theemerging point, putting it down and chopping away, picking it upand looking at it until he was satisfied with the point. He then laidthe garden stake in the finished pile on his right and picked upanother stick from the original pile.
 
After watching his grandfather sharpen five stakes, Tommy spokeup."Grandpa?""Yes, Tommy?," the old man asked, pausing in his work andlooking at the young boy of six with a smile."Dad says you take too long.""Take too long doing what"?"That.""Sharpening garden stakes?""Uh huh.""He said that?""Uh huh.""That I take too long?""Uh huh.""That's it? That's all he said-that I take too long?""Not exactly." The old man's smile had broadened as he spoke with the boy.Now he watched as Tommy, with head down, played with thesuspender clasps on his overalls."Well, out with it then, Thomas. What did your dad say exactly?" There was another pause until Tommy stopped fiddling with hisoveralls and looked up. "Dad said it would be cheaper to buy `emthen spend all afternoon makin' `em.""Well. Tommy, you can tell your dad that these particular garden

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