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Livestock, Livelihoods, and Disaster Response: PART ONE: A Review of Livestock-Based Livelihood Projects in Sudan

Livestock, Livelihoods, and Disaster Response: PART ONE: A Review of Livestock-Based Livelihood Projects in Sudan

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Tufts/ FIC are pleased to announce the publication of a two part review of emergency livestock interventions in Sudan. Livestock production is a crucial livelihood strategy for farmers and pastoralists throughout Sudan, and contributes to a wider economy linked with livestock marketing, livestock products, fodder and water. In Sudan there is a long experience of livestock interventions that predates the development of the international “Livestock Emergency Guidelines and Standards”, including for example provision of veterinary services (vaccination, training of Community Animal Health Workers), animal fodder, restocking and destocking livestock, etc. Given this wide-ranging history and experience this study was interested to review the current state of emergency livestock projects and how LEGS had made a difference.
Tufts/ FIC are pleased to announce the publication of a two part review of emergency livestock interventions in Sudan. Livestock production is a crucial livelihood strategy for farmers and pastoralists throughout Sudan, and contributes to a wider economy linked with livestock marketing, livestock products, fodder and water. In Sudan there is a long experience of livestock interventions that predates the development of the international “Livestock Emergency Guidelines and Standards”, including for example provision of veterinary services (vaccination, training of Community Animal Health Workers), animal fodder, restocking and destocking livestock, etc. Given this wide-ranging history and experience this study was interested to review the current state of emergency livestock projects and how LEGS had made a difference.

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Published by: Feinstein International Center on Nov 25, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/29/2013

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Strengthening the humanity and dignity of people in crisis through knowledge and practice
SEPTEMBER 2013
Livestock, Livelihoods, and Disaster Response: PART ONE: A Review of Livestock-Based Livelihood Projects in Sudan
Merry Fitzpatrick, Helen Young 
 
 
©2013 Feinstein International Center. All Rights Reserved.Fair use of this copyrighted material includes its use for non-commercial educational purposes, such as teaching, scholarship, research, criticism, commentary, and news reporting. Unless otherwise noted, those who wish to reproduce text and image files from this publication for such uses may do so without the Feinstein International Center’s express permission. However, all commercial use of this material and/or reproduction that alters its meaning or intent, without the express permission of the Feinstein International Center, is prohibited.Feinstein International CenterTufts University114 Curtis StreetSomerville, MA 02144USAtel: +1 617.627.3423fax: +1 617.627.3428fic.tufts.edu
 
Acknowledgements
This desk review was made possible through the active support from many individuals and organizations, including the contributions of both data and instructive inputs. Many thanks to Magda Nassef (UNEP Sudan) for the many insightful inputs and comments to the review itself, and for sharing the findings from the UNCT Steering Group on Pastoralism’s preliminary survey of action for pastoralists.For their continuing support at various stages in the development of this report, thanks to: Magda Nassef, Belihu Negesse, Abdelhafiz Mohamed Adam, Getachew Gebru, Hanan Youssif, and Janet Aamir. We are very grateful to UNEP, UNOCHA, FAO, and the international LEGS Project for the provision of data and narrative reports. Thanks are due to Adam Salih, for the preliminary work that informed this review, and for getting the ball rolling. For valuable comments on the final draft, many thanks are due to: Magda Nassef, Belihu Negesse, Cathy Watson, and Jimmy Owani.Finally, many thanks to the Tufts staff in Khartoum, especially Belihu Negesse, Abdelhafiz Mohamed Adam, and  Janet Aamir, for their help with the coordination and administration of this work, and to Laura Banks for her continued support and inputs at all stages of this work.This study was funded by UKAID under their support to UNEP’s Sudan Integrated Environment Programme.Cover photo: Jane Beesley, Oxfam

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