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Inspired by Hungarian Poetry - British Poets in Conversation with Attila József (pdf)

Inspired by Hungarian Poetry - British Poets in Conversation with Attila József (pdf)

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Published by Balassi Intézet
The Balassi Institute Hungarian Cultural Centre London launched its new project ‘Inspired by Hungarian poetry: British poets in conversation with Attila József’ in celebration of the Hungarian Culture Day on 22 January 2013.

On 22 January 1823 Ferenc Kölcsey – one of the most important literary fi gures in Hungarian history – completed his manuscript of the Hungarian National Anthem. Since 1989 Hungarian culture is celebrated on this day.

To mark this special event, the Balassi Institute Hungarian Cultural Centre London invited British poets to contribute to its new project with a poem of their own written in response to the poems of the Hungarian poet Attila József (1905-1937). The original idea of the ‘British poets in conversation with Attila József ’ project came from Tibor Fischer, the internationally renowned British writer of Hungarian origin.

The aim of the project is to raise awareness and appreciation of Hungarian poetry among readers in the UK through initiating a poetic conversation between renowned British poets and selected poems of the outstanding Hungarian poet Attila József.

The Hungarian Cultural Centre asked British poets to respond to a selection of Attila József’s poems in English translation, put into English beautifully by John Bátki, Edwin Morgan, George Szirtes and Peter Zollman.

The present online anthology, published on 11 April 2013 – the birthday of Attila József and the National Poetry Day in Hungary – is the product of the poetic ‘conversation’ between Attila József and more than a dozen of his present-day British counterparts.

A gala reading in London on 11 April 2013 celebrates the occasion of the launch of the anthology, Attila József’s work and poetry.

Balassi Institute - Hungarian Cultural Centre, London
2013
The Balassi Institute Hungarian Cultural Centre London launched its new project ‘Inspired by Hungarian poetry: British poets in conversation with Attila József’ in celebration of the Hungarian Culture Day on 22 January 2013.

On 22 January 1823 Ferenc Kölcsey – one of the most important literary fi gures in Hungarian history – completed his manuscript of the Hungarian National Anthem. Since 1989 Hungarian culture is celebrated on this day.

To mark this special event, the Balassi Institute Hungarian Cultural Centre London invited British poets to contribute to its new project with a poem of their own written in response to the poems of the Hungarian poet Attila József (1905-1937). The original idea of the ‘British poets in conversation with Attila József ’ project came from Tibor Fischer, the internationally renowned British writer of Hungarian origin.

The aim of the project is to raise awareness and appreciation of Hungarian poetry among readers in the UK through initiating a poetic conversation between renowned British poets and selected poems of the outstanding Hungarian poet Attila József.

The Hungarian Cultural Centre asked British poets to respond to a selection of Attila József’s poems in English translation, put into English beautifully by John Bátki, Edwin Morgan, George Szirtes and Peter Zollman.

The present online anthology, published on 11 April 2013 – the birthday of Attila József and the National Poetry Day in Hungary – is the product of the poetic ‘conversation’ between Attila József and more than a dozen of his present-day British counterparts.

A gala reading in London on 11 April 2013 celebrates the occasion of the launch of the anthology, Attila József’s work and poetry.

Balassi Institute - Hungarian Cultural Centre, London
2013

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Published by: Balassi Intézet on Nov 26, 2013
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05/26/2014

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INSPIRED BY HUNGARIAN POETRY
BRITISH POETS IN CONVERSATION WITH ATTILA JÓZSEF
󰀲󰀰󰀱󰀳
 
CONTENTS
FOREWORD INTRODUCTIONATTILA JÓZSEF IN ENGLISHTRANSLATION POEMS BY ATTILA JÓZSEF
Születésnapomra – On my birthday Reménytelenül – Without hope Óda – Ode Kései sirató – Belated lament A Dunánál – By the Danube Karóval jöttél – You came with a stick…
POEMS INSPIRED BY ATTILA JÓZSEF’S POETRY
Derek Adams,
 Hopeless
Polly Clark,
 Graduation Photo, 1964
 Antony Dunn,
Heart
 Jacqueline Gabbitas,
Grass looks on with disinterest at themothers and the sons who follow 4713212228304248566163636667
 
George Gömöri,
 Te last apple
 Wayne Holloway-Smith,
Valentines Day 1919
 Ágnes Lehóczky,
En Route for the Airport through the Ninth District
 Tim Liardet,
 Te Guam Fever
 John McAuliffe,
 EXI
 John Mole,
 Bequests
Clare Pollard,
 Future Without Hope(Tat I Hope Will Not Happen)
Clare Pollard,
 Beads
Sam Riviere,
(preface)
Carol Rumens,
Laundry Blue
Carol Rumens,
Easter Snow 
Fiona Sampson
, By the Danube
George Szirtes,
 In the Banlieue
 Ater Attila Józses ‘A város peremén’ 
 Tom Warner,
Danube
NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS
697072767880818283848587899497

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