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On the Immensity of God.

On the Immensity of God.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY ROBERT BALMER, D.D.

Solomon s Prayer. I. Definition. Mode of the Divine Omnipresence.
Idea of Heathen Philosophy. Pope, Newton, and others. Subject
incomprehensible. II. Proofs from Reason and Nature from
Scripture. Immensity of God connected with his Omniscience,
Omnipotence, and Spirituality. III. Practical aspects. Immensity
of the Divine Essence of God, as the Preserver as the Object of
worship. Heaven. Of God, as the Inspector of Moral Conduct.
Conscience. Hell. Omnipresence of God as the Friend and Helper
of his people.
BY ROBERT BALMER, D.D.

Solomon s Prayer. I. Definition. Mode of the Divine Omnipresence.
Idea of Heathen Philosophy. Pope, Newton, and others. Subject
incomprehensible. II. Proofs from Reason and Nature from
Scripture. Immensity of God connected with his Omniscience,
Omnipotence, and Spirituality. III. Practical aspects. Immensity
of the Divine Essence of God, as the Preserver as the Object of
worship. Heaven. Of God, as the Inspector of Moral Conduct.
Conscience. Hell. Omnipresence of God as the Friend and Helper
of his people.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Nov 27, 2013
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ON THE IMMENSITY OF GOD. BY ROBERT BALMER, D.D.Solomon s Prayer. I. Definition. Mode of the Divine Omnipresence. Idea of Heathen Philosophy. Pope, Newton, and others. Subject incomprehensible. II. Proofs from Reason and Nature from Scripture. Immensity of God connected with his Omniscience, Omnipotence, and Spirituality. III. Practical aspects. Immensity of the Divine Essence of God, as the Preserver as the Object of worship. Heaven. Of God, as the Inspector of Moral Conduct. Conscience. Hell. Omnipresence of God as the Friend and Helper of his people. Addison quoted. Reflections. WE are informed, that at the dedication of the most magnificent edifice that ever was erected for divine worship, when the wisest of men was praying as the mouth of the largest religious assembly that ever was convened on earth, the idea of the immensity of God rushed irresistibly on his mind, and overpowered him for a time with astonishment and awe. After Solomon had spent seven years in building the temple of Jeru salem, and after he had lavished the riches of Canaan and the neighbouring countries in embellishing it, he could not help thinking how unworthy even such a
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structure was of that great Being u who dwells not in temples made with hands," and " who is not worshipped as if he needed any thing." He exclaimed, therefore, with devout transport, " But will God in very deed dwell with men on the earth ? behold, heaven, and the heaven of heavens cannot contain thee ; how much less this house which I have built ?" ON THE IMMENSITY OF GOD. 185 It is not wonderful that Solomon should have been transported with amazement at the thought, that a being whose essence is diffused over the whole infini tude of space should condescend to dwell in a temple made with hands. Regarded merely as an object of contemplation, the immensity of God overpowers our faculties and overawes our hearts ; and there is, per haps, none of his attributes better calculated to exert a salutary and powerful control over the conduct both of the righteous and the wicked. The idea of the divine omnipresence will sometimes obtrude itself, even on the most giddy and thoughtless ; and impress them
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with a momentary seriousness. It has checked the sinner hurrying impetuously along the career of iniquity, and compelled him to pause or draw back in dismay and terror. It has thrown a chilling damp a freezing horror on the spirits of the sensualist while revelling amid the delusive " pleasures of sin," and it has palsied the hand which was stretched forth to pluck the fruit of the forbidden tree. It has irradiated and cheered the abode of poverty and affliction, and nerved the arm of piety and virtue, and impelled to deeds of fortitude and valour, of " faith and patience." It is this perfection of the divine nature omnipre sence or immensity that I propose to consider in the present discourse. In leading your meditations on this subject, I shall first state, generally, what we are to understand by this attribute. I shall advert, secondly, to the proofs which warrant us to ascribe it to God. And then, thirdly, I shall farther illustrate the subject by exhibiting this perfection in some of those aspects in which it is most useful to contemplate it. I. To define or explain this attribute must be almost superfluous ; for you are probably all aware, that when
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