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Outcome Document of the South Asian Consultation on the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Outcome Document of the South Asian Consultation on the Post-2015 Development Agenda

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CEPA's annual poverty symposium was conducted this year on the topic 'Making Sustainability the Next Metric: the post-2015 development agenda'.

The consultation was structured around five major topics: economic growth within natural limits, equity and sustainability, shared societies and governance, the role of technology and ownership and instruments of delivery; and based on thirteen academic papers presented by the participants focusing on these issues.

This outcome document summarises the key outcomes of this consultation.
CEPA's annual poverty symposium was conducted this year on the topic 'Making Sustainability the Next Metric: the post-2015 development agenda'.

The consultation was structured around five major topics: economic growth within natural limits, equity and sustainability, shared societies and governance, the role of technology and ownership and instruments of delivery; and based on thirteen academic papers presented by the participants focusing on these issues.

This outcome document summarises the key outcomes of this consultation.

More info:

Categories:Presentations
Published by: Centre for Poverty Analysis on Nov 28, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/29/2013

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1
 
Outcome
 
Document
 
of
 
the
 
South
 
sian
 
Consultation
 
Centre
 
for
 
Poverty
 
nalysis
 
Colombo Sri
 
Lanka
 
 
2
 
INTRODUCTION
 
Background
 
Since
 
their
 
adoption
 
in
 
2000,
 
the
 
Millennium
 
Development
 
Goals
 
(MDGs)
 
took
 
centre
 
stage
 
as
 
a
 
framework
 
for
 
national
 
and
 
international
 
development
 
efforts
 
and
 
cooperation,
 
policymaking
 
and
 
resource
 
mobilisation.
 
They
 
were
 
a
 
practical
 
and
 
measurable
 
articulation
 
of 
 
the
 
Millennium
 
Declaration
 
and
 
enjoyed
 
support
 
from
 
governments
 
and
 
the
 
development
 
communities.
 
They
 
focused
 
largely
 
on
 
the
 
social
 
aspects
 
of 
 
development,
 
and
 
while
 
there
 
has
 
been
 
considerable
 
progress
 
towards
 
their
 
achievement,
 
there
 
are
 
also
 
significant
 
disparities
 
within
 
and
 
across
 
the
 
countries.
 
The
 
backdrop
 
to
 
the
 
MDGs
 
was
 
the
 
Asian
 
financial
 
crisis
 
that
 
pointed
 
to
 
a
 
need
 
for
 
systemic
 
reforms,
 
and
 
the
 
end
 
of 
 
the
 
cold
 
war
 
that
 
led
 
to
 
expectations
 
of 
 
increased
 
ODA.
 
Despite
 
their
 
centrality,
 
the
 
MDGs
 
were
 
seen
 
as
 
a
 
suboptimal
 
response
 
to
 
the
 
shelving
 
of 
 
systemic
 
changes
 
as
 
the
 
world
 
economy
 
recovered
 
from
 
the
 
financial
 
crisis,
 
and
 
as
 
an
 
attempt
 
to
 
win
 
the
 
confidence
 
of 
 
tax
 
payers
 
in
 
the
 
north
 
on
 
the
 
effectiveness
 
of 
 
ODA.
 
They
 
were
 
largely
 
developed
 
in
 
a
 
political
 
vacuum,
 
emanating
 
from
 
a
 
series
 
of 
 
high
profile
 
international
 
conferences
 
during
 
the
 
1990s.
 
On
 
top
 
of 
 
this,
 
the
 
MDGs
 
were
 
executed
 
around
 
a
 
set
 
of 
 
largely
 
pre
existing
 
and
 
narrowly
 
defined
 
targets
 
 –
 
inspired
 
by
 
the
 
Human
 
Development
 
paradigm.
 
Today,
 
almost
 
a
 
decade
 
and
 
a
 
half 
 
after
 
governments
 
signed
 
up
 
to
 
the
 
MDGs,
 
it
 
is
 
evident
 
that
 
there
 
is
 
a
 
need
 
for
 
a
 
post
2015
 
agenda
 
that
 
balances
 
the
 
social,
 
economic
 
and
 
environmental
 
aspects
 
of 
 
development.
 
The
 
discussion
 
on
 
a
 
new
 
set
 
of 
 
post
2015
 
development
 
goals
 
aims
 
to
 
integrate
 
the
 
debate
 
that
 
has
 
been
 
gathering
 
since
 
the
 
Rio+20
 
summit’s
 
declaration
 
of 
 
the
 
need
 
for
 
sustainable
 
development
 
goals
 
(SDG),
 
and
 
the
 
post
 
2015
 
discussion
 
on
 
the
 
next
 
round
 
of 
 
millennium
 
development
 
goals
 
(MDGs).
 
Currently,
 
there
 
are
 
propositions
 
made
 
by
 
various
 
groups
 
on
 
what
 
the
 
overarching
 
principles
 
should
 
be,
 
what
 
the
 
goals
 
should
 
contain,
 
and
 
how
 
they
 
should
 
be
 
implemented
 
and
 
internalised
 
by
 
countries.
 
The
 
setting
 
of 
 
goals
 
is
 
a
 
complicated
 
exercise,
 
as
 
decisions
 
are
 
dependent
 
on
 
the
 
ambitions
 
and
 
interests
 
of 
 
sovereign
 
states,
 
their
 
political
 
leadership,
 
and
 
lobby
 
groups
 
with
 
diverse
 
vested
 
agendas.
 
If 
 
endorsed
 
and
 
adopted
 
by
 
the
 
world
 
 –
 
as
 
in
 
the
 
case
 
of 
 
the
 
current
 
MDGs,
 
sustainable
 
post
2015
 
goals
 
can
 
impact
 
aid
 
architecture,
 
trade
 
policies,
 
technology
 
development
 
and
 
transfer,
 
and
 
international
 
cooperation,
 
as
 
well
 
as
 
shape
 
domestic
 
development
 
policies
 
of 
 
individual
 
states.
 
The
 
discussions
 
display
 
some
 
scepticism
 
about
 
the
 
effectiveness
 
of 
 
growth
centred
 
models
 
to
 
eradicate
 
poverty.
 
South
 
Asia,
 
for
 
instance,
 
is
 
one
 
of 
 
the
 
fastest
 
growing
 
regions
 
in
 
the
 
world,
 
but
 
it
 
is
 
also
 
home
 
to
 
the
 
largest
 
concentration
 
of 
 
people
 
living
 
in
 
extreme
 
poverty.
 
The
 
future
 
development
 
orientation
 
will
 
have
 
impacts
 
on
 
South
 
Asia
 
and
 
for
 
each
 
country
 
in
 
the
 
region,
 
and
 
there
 
remains
 
the
 
question
 
on
 
whether
 
a
 
‘universal’
 
framework
 
can
 
address
 
the
 
critical
 
development
 
concerns
 
of 
 
South
 
Asian
 
and
 
other
 
vulnerable
 
economies.
 
 
3
 
There
 
are
 
also
 
more
 
scientific
 
agreement,
 
evidence
 
and
 
lived
 
experiences
 
that
 
highlight
 
the
 
threats
 
of 
 
environmental
 
degradation
 
on
 
human
 
well
 
being.
 
Climate
 
scientists
 
predict
 
that
 
South
 
Asia
 
will
 
be
 
one
 
of 
 
the
 
regions
 
worst
 
affected
 
by
 
climate
 
change,
 
and
 
that
 
will
 
significantly
 
reduce
 
the
 
impact
 
of 
 
poverty
 
alleviation
 
efforts.
 
Poor
 
people
 
are
 
disproportionately
 
reliant
 
on
 
natural
 
assets
 
and
 
vulnerable
 
to
 
climate
 
and
 
scarcity
 
risks.
 
The
 
current
 
models
 
of 
 
development
 
are
 
also
 
the
 
main
 
drivers
 
of 
 
unsustainability,
 
and
 
a
 
global
 
framework
 
that
 
would
 
work
 
within
 
the
 
natural
 
limits
 
of 
 
the
 
planet
 
would
 
require
 
developed
 
countries
 
to
 
adhere
 
to
 
a
 
programme
 
of 
 
sustainable
 
production
 
and
 
consumption.
 
Whether
 
this
 
will
 
be
 
a
 
practical
 
reality
 
is
 
still
 
to
 
be
 
seen.
 
Much
 
of 
 
the
 
on
going
 
discussions
 
on
 
the
 
post
2015
 
development
 
agenda
 
have
 
been
 
provided
 
by
 
“northern”
 
institutions.
 
It
 
is
 
critical
 
though,
 
that
 
as
 
South
 
Asians,
 
we
 
focus
 
on
 
the
 
on
going
 
global
 
debates
 
in
 
the
 
context
 
of 
 
post
2015,
 
and
 
ensure
 
that
 
the
 
concerns,
 
development
 
priorities,
 
and
 
aspirations
 
of 
 
South
 
Asian
 
countries
 
are
 
also
 
given
 
greater
 
voice
 
and
 
are
 
included
 
into
 
this
 
debate.
 
The
 
Southern
 
Voice
 
on
 
Post
MDG
 
International
 
Development
 
Goals
 
is
 
leading
 
the
 
effort
 
to
 
increase
 
Southern
 
(Asian,
 
African
 
and
 
Latin
 
American)
 
think
 
tank
 
perspectives
 
and
 
ideas
 
and
 
has
 
strong
 
potential
 
to
 
influence
 
the
 
high
level
 
discussions
 
on
 
the
 
post
2015
 
development
 
framework.
 
The
 
 
Centre
 
for
 
Poverty
 
Analysis,
 
in
 
collaboration
 
and
 
shared
 
ownership
 
with
 
the
 
Centre
 
for
 
Policy
 
Dialogue
 
(Bangladesh),
 
the
 
Sustainable
 
Development
 
Policy
 
Institute
 
(Pakistan),
 
Practical
 
Action
 
(Sri
 
Lanka)
 
and
 
the
 
South
 
Asia
 
Policy
 
Research
 
Institute
 
(SAPRI)
 
brought
 
together
 
about
 
forty
 
participants
 
from
 
Pakistan,
 
Bangladesh,
 
Nepal
 
and
 
Sri
 
Lanka,
 
and
 
representatives
 
from
 
Mauritius,
 
Japan,
 
Switzerland,
 
Germany
 
and
 
the
 
UK
 
into
 
a
 
consultation
 
in
 
Colombo.
 
The
 
consultation
 
enabled
 
an
 
integrated
 
discussion
 
of 
 
both
 
sustainability
 
and
 
socio
economic
 
issues
 
in
 
the
 
context
 
of 
 
the
 
post
2015
 
development
 
agenda,
 
with
 
special
 
reference
 
to
 
Asia,
 
and
 
South
 
Asia
 
in
 
particular.
 
The
 
dialogue
 
was
 
multi
disciplinary,
 
and
 
included
 
economists,
 
environmentalists,
 
technologists,
 
political
 
scientists,
 
sociologists,
 
anthropologists
 
and
 
policy
 
makers
 
from
 
different
 
levels
 
in
 
the
 
public
 
and
 
private
 
sectors.
 
The
 
consultation
 
was
 
structured
 
around
 
five
 
major
 
topics:
 
economic
 
growth
 
within
 
natural
 
limits,
 
equity
 
and
 
sustainability,
 
shared
 
societies
 
and
 
governance,
 
the
 
role
 
of 
 
technology
 
and
 
ownership
 
and
 
instruments
 
of 
 
delivery;
 
and
 
based
 
on
 
thirteen
 
academic
 
papers
 
presented
 
by
 
the
 
participants
 
focusing
 
on
 
these
 
issues.
 
This
 
outcome
 
document
 
summarises
 
the
 
key
 
outcomes
 
of 
 
this
 
consultation.
 
A
 
more
 
detailed
 
report
 
of 
 
the
 
discussion
 
is
 
forthcoming.
 
All
 
documents
 
related
 
to
 
the
 
symposium
 
are
 
available
 
at
 
http://cepa.lk/index.php/en/events/annual-poverty-symposium-2013.
Video
 
coverage
 
of 
 
the
 
sessions
 
can
 
be
 
viewed
 
on
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Kp8MiTmfsg&list=PLsNHgk0wbmKSaX697Py9Dxpk9L5oU
6bJ&index=1.
 

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