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Livingston Associates G3 Final Report 072109

Livingston Associates G3 Final Report 072109

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Published by: Scott McCrea on Aug 19, 2009
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09/27/2010

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G3 Vision Report
Steve LindbeckBill LegereJake Poole
 
G3:
 
Transforming
 
 Alaska
 
Public
 
Media
 
General managers from KTOO‐Juneau, KUAC‐Fairbanks and APTI‐Anchorage have met frequently, either by telephone or in person, from August 2008 to July 2009 to discussemerging needs and pressures in public media and to imagine better futures. These wide‐ranging discussions settled upon the view by late spring 2009 that nothing short of transformation is required for public broadcasting and its core values to survive andflourish in our communities in a transformed media environment. What follows is themanagers’ vision of what belongs in a new entity we propose to call Alaska Public Media.his vision is distilled from dozens of hours of brainstorming and conversation, and is theeneral managers’ shared proposal for how public media should evolve in our communities.Tg 
V
 
ision:
 
Alaska Public Media (APM) will be Alaska’s leader in news, education and publicaffairs – a community‐builder, a unifier, a convener and an aggregator of content from many sources. Its tools will be news, community engagement, participation,dialogue and a spectrum of program production ranging from premiumdocumentaries to twitter tweets. APM will be based on the news and programmingvalues exemplified by NPR and PBS, yet it forthrightly proclaims that its centralmission in the emerging world of global media lies in the Alaska content it produces.This content is the news, public affairs, education and cultural programs that willenrich and inform the lives of Alaskans, and also engage them in networks of connection and dialogue with each other and indeed with a global media audienceand environment. APM will present content on multiple platforms and willexperiment deliberately in social networking, crowd sourcing, citizen journalismand emerging digital media. Its scope, its definition of “community,” is statewide,though its operations take place in Anchorage, Fairbanks and Juneau. APM willprovide a full package of media streams rooted in NPR/PBS values, approach andquality, and covering news and events at the local, state, national and internationallevels. The work of the Alaska Public Radio Network, AlaskaOne, 360 North, Gavel toGavel and UATV will be incorporated into a unified network. The entities that combine to form Alaska Public Media will reach new levels of public service byworking together, in a mission that serves the shared experience of life in Alaska.Mission language will strongly evoke unity and Alaskan ownership of a public, not‐for‐profit service entity operating under a new economic model. Alaska PublicMedia is the forum for Alaska to redefine itself again and again as time andcircumstances evolve.
W
 
hy:
 
With the issues and public‐interest stakes higher than ever, Alaskans need anddeserve information, understanding, connection and context in order to solveproblems, create prosperity, build communities, unify the state. Yet even as digitalmedia cut the costs of distribution, Alaska is left behind in the new world of content production. Commercial media budgets are slashed as business models arerewritten and deeply strained. A building crisis in journalism threatens the flow of quality news and public affairs and heightens both the challenge and need for strong
 
G3: Transforming Alaska Public Media 2
public media. Alaskans are grossly underserved by media and, despite beingrelatively well wired for the digital age, stand at risk of being left behind in themedia revolution now under way. Very little of Alaska’s media services are Alaska‐owned or cognizant of the importance of a statewide voice. Hence the problemsdividing us are seldom addressed in a unifying way. Dennis McMillian’s report of takeholder interviews this spring captures in a powerful way the missionwareness we enjoy:sa 
“The
 
consensus
 
as
 
to
 
the
 
mission
 
of 
 
 public
 
broadcasting
 
was
 
overwhelming.
 
In
 
my 
 
opinion,
 
this
 
is
 
one
 
of 
 
the
 
clearest 
 
understandings
 
of 
 
an
 
institution’s
 
‘brand 
 
 proposition,’ 
 
or 
 
the
 
 public’s
 
expectations
 
of 
 
an
 
organization’s
 
 purpose
 
and 
 
how 
 
they 
 
deliver 
 
on
 
that 
 
 promise.
 
In
 
the
 
interviews,
 
 
documented 
 
the
 
 first 
 
words
 
that 
 
came
 
to
 
mind 
 
when
 
 
asked 
 
the
 
question
 
regarding
 
mission.
 
In
 
high
 
to
 
low 
 
sequence
 
the
 
words
 
most 
 
used 
 
were:
 
news/journalism,
 
local 
 
voice,
 
connecting
 
local 
-
state
-
nation
-
world,
 
unbiased,
 
and 
 
quality.
 
There
 
was
 
almost 
 
unanimous
 
agreement 
 
that 
 
 public
 
broadcasting
 
does
 
very 
 
well 
 
in
 
accomplishing
 
its
 
mission.
 
However,
 
many 
 
 felt 
 
that 
 
local 
 
and 
 
statewide
 
news
 
has
 
diminished 
 
over 
 
the
 
 past 
 
both
 
in
 
terms
 
of 
 
quality 
 
and 
 
quantity.” 
 
 few 
 
 years,
 
And later:
 
“If 
 
any 
 
question
 
evoked 
 
a
 
constant 
 
message
 
 from
 
constituents,
 
it 
 
is
 
that 
 
news
 
is
 
a
 
core
 
 function
 
of 
 
 public
 
broadcasting
 
and 
 
quality 
 
news
 
is
 
what 
 
draws
 
almost 
 
all 
 
of 
 
those
 
interviewed 
 
into
 
 passionate
 
support 
 
and 
 
appreciation.
 
Only 
 
three
 
 people
 
mentioned 
 
a
 
 perceived 
 
‘liberal 
 
bias.’ 
 
Most 
 
truly 
 
think 
 
that 
 
 public
 
broadcast 
 
news
 
is
 
as
 
unbiased 
 
as
 
 possible.
 
Of 
 
the
 
state’s
 
most 
 
influential 
 
leaders
 
we
 
interviewed,
 
all 
 
voiced 
 
extreme
 
loyalty 
 
to
 
and 
 
confidence
 
in
 
NPR
 
 journalism.
 
NPR
 
was
 
identified 
 
as
 
the
 
source
 
they 
 
trust 
 
most 
 
to
 
learn
 
about 
 
news.” 
 
E
 
lements
 
that 
 
belong
 
in
 
the
 
new
 
 Alaska
 
Public
 
Media:
 
 
Statewide news/public affairs service operating on all media platforms, with stories,sources and content producers from all regions of the state. Broadcast productioncenters and production talent in each community. Synergies developed betweenradio, television and web operations.
 
Deepened and strengthened local roots in radio broadcasting in all communities,including expanded use of digital radio and multicast.
 
Expanded and unified news operation involving both local reporters in eachommunity or region and statewide reporters based in Washington DC, Juneau andcelsewhere as needed.
 
New media unit empowered to experiment in social media and other emergingdigital platforms. This unit is resourced to incorporate new opportunities as theyarise, encouraged to innovate, expected to root its work in new media rather thanlegacy platforms, and tasked to bring Alaska Public Media to the forefront of emerging media activities.

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