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Profit and Loss.

Profit and Loss.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY THE REV. ROBERT NEWTON.

'For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul ? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul ?" — Matt. xvi. 26.
BY THE REV. ROBERT NEWTON.

'For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul ? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul ?" — Matt. xvi. 26.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Nov 30, 2013
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11/30/2013

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PROFIT AND LOSS. BY THE REV. ROBERT NEWTON. 'For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul ? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul ?" — Matt. xvi. 26. This is, indeed, my friends, one of the most grave, and, at the same time, one of the most interesting questions that ever was proposed. Well and truly has an eminent divine designated this question,  by way of eminence, in a discourse which he has published on the text — "The im- portant question." The question relates not to profit and loss in any ordinary or trivial concerns, which will not and can-not materially affect us, whichever way the scale may happen to turn : the inquiry regards the loss or the gain, the perdition or the salvation, of a man's own soul. And can any thing in the universe of God be of equal importance to man with the salvation of his own soul ] Nor is
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this question, my friends, of partial inte-rest. It is not addressed particularly or exclusively to any given number of our species; it concerns each and all, learned and unlettered, male and female; for, as every human being has a soul, it must either be saved or lost. The great Teacher, who spake as never man spake, and knew how forcible are right words, proposes the sentiment of true wisdom which the text contains, by way of inquiry; as though, by this cir-cumstance, he would indirectly teach us that no man, with a rightly-constituted mind, can for a moment question or doubt a statement so self-evident. He employs the interrogatory form of speech, doubt-less, that the appeal, which is made to every man's reason and conscience, as in the sight of God, might be the more forcible and conclusive.
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Surely, if the sons of ambition would  but seriously reflect on this question, they would find themselves very powerfully arrested in their pursuit of this world's honour; and if the giddy and the gay would but allow themselves to ponder this great question, they would find them-selves checked in their eager attempts after this world's pleasure ; and were the man of business, who has set his heart on the acquisition of substance and wealth, or could the miser, whose name is by interpretation miserable, but allow him-self to consider this question, they would  pause and ask themselves, Am I, then, after all, making a good bargain ] " For what is a man profited, if he gain the whole world, and lose his own soul ] or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul "?" It is, however, true that persons may  professedly admit the truth, and wisdom,
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