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The Loss of Friends.

The Loss of Friends.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY ANTHONY W. THOROLD, D.D.

"O the anguish of that thought, that we can never
atone to our dead for the stinted affection we gave them,
for the light answers we returned to their plaints or their
pleadings, for the little reverence that we showed to that
sacred human soul that lived so close to us, and was the
divinest thing God had given us to know."

— Amos Barton.
BY ANTHONY W. THOROLD, D.D.

"O the anguish of that thought, that we can never
atone to our dead for the stinted affection we gave them,
for the light answers we returned to their plaints or their
pleadings, for the little reverence that we showed to that
sacred human soul that lived so close to us, and was the
divinest thing God had given us to know."

— Amos Barton.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Dec 06, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/06/2013

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THE LOSS OF FRIENDS. BY ANTHONY W. THOROLD, D.D."O the anguish of that thought, that we can never atone to our dead for the stinted affection we gave them, for the light answers we returned to their plaints or their pleadings, for the little reverence that we showed to that sacred human soul that lived so close to us, and was the divinest thing God had given us to know."  — Amos Barton. THE LOSS OF FRIENDS. LAZARUS IS DEAD.' |(HERE are many ways of losing friends.
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When they go to a distance, and we can not reach them, we soon discover that the most profuse letter-writing is not like once seeing them face to face. The features grow misty in the haze of distance. Where there are fewer objects in common, there are fewer sympathies. We are compelled to reconcile ourselves to circumstances ; we see that in this world v/e can not have everything our own way. It is for the happiness of both of us that we presently cease to be necessary to each other, and so, w4th mutual consent, we grow fresh flowers in the heart. Or we may lose them through a momentary indiscreetness we would give anything to re-(255) 256 THE YOKE OF CHRIST, call, or through a wretched misunderstanding
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which ten manly words, frankly and brightly spoken, would set right forever. But the op-portunity has not come, and the flaw grows into the tree, and a slight estrangement hard-ens into the alienation of a life. For time can aggravate as well as heal. Men and women do not always become more willing to explain things as they grow older. If there were more peace-makers, perhaps there would be more reconciliations ; but we all shrink too selfishly, too timidly, from the delicate and difficult task of mediating ; and thus old friends, warm-hearted but proud, who would welcome the least excuse for shaking hands over the past, never find it, and go down to the grave with a dull weight on their heart. But that '' loss of friends " on which I would write now is the saddest, for it is irremedi-able ; the commonest, for it is the lot of all in turn ; the most abiding, for the Resurrec-tion seems far away. It is the loss by death, which long ago made the army of the dead outnumber the army of the living, and which is
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