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Marriage.

Marriage.

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Published by glennpease
BY ANTHONY W. THOROLD, D.D.

AND ISAAC BROUGHT HER INTO HIS MOTHER SARAH'S TENT, AND TOOK REBEKAH, AND SHE BECAME HIS WIFE ; AND HE LOVED HER ; AND ISAAC WAS COMFORTED AFTER HIS MOTHER'S DEATH."

THE married life is the ''perfect life."
So sing the poets ; in this, as in most
things, being right. For even if the
sombre prose of actual experience may not
always climb, or long bask in that sunny table-
land, a lofty ideal has constant influence on
evcry-day conduct ; and conscience has some-
thing to say about the measure of our happi-
ness being usually in proportion to our deserts.
BY ANTHONY W. THOROLD, D.D.

AND ISAAC BROUGHT HER INTO HIS MOTHER SARAH'S TENT, AND TOOK REBEKAH, AND SHE BECAME HIS WIFE ; AND HE LOVED HER ; AND ISAAC WAS COMFORTED AFTER HIS MOTHER'S DEATH."

THE married life is the ''perfect life."
So sing the poets ; in this, as in most
things, being right. For even if the
sombre prose of actual experience may not
always climb, or long bask in that sunny table-
land, a lofty ideal has constant influence on
evcry-day conduct ; and conscience has some-
thing to say about the measure of our happi-
ness being usually in proportion to our deserts.

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Published by: glennpease on Dec 06, 2013
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12/06/2013

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MARRIAGE. BY ANTHONY W. THOROLD, D.D.AND ISAAC BROUGHT HER INTO HIS MOTHER SARAH'S TENT, AND TOOK REBEKAH, AND SHE BECAME HIS WIFE ; AND HE LOVED HER ; AND ISAAC WAS COMFORTED AFTER HIS MOTHER'S DEATH." THE married life is the ''perfect life." So sing the poets ; in this, as in most things, being right. For even if the sombre prose of actual experience may not always climb, or long bask in that sunny table-land, a lofty ideal has constant influence on evcry-day conduct ; and conscience has some-thing to say about the measure of our happi-ness being usually in proportion to our deserts. The heart says yes, even if it be a lonely heart. Nay, though the summer be gone, and, with the cold wet wind sighing drearily over blackened flowers and thinned trees, a 20 (305)
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3o6 THE YOKE OF CHRIST, feeble flash of mocking sunshine peeps into a room where now there is but one chair by the fire, and where but half a Hfe does the best it can without the other half, there is still mem-ory, there is also hope. Reason says yes also, and has good cause for saying so ; for is not marriage the satisfaction of all the nature of man ? Does it not mean society, where the mutual presence of man and wife is a sweet, though often inarticulate, language ; and sym-pathy in that perfect trustfulness which is the true sabbath of the heart ; and oneness in all that touches the springs of life, and the sharing of secrets, and the bearing of burdens, and the tasting of joy ? Nay, a oneness, as a poet has subtilly put it, even to bring back into the far past — before we met, saw, and loved. Ever since our birth steadily we were approaching each other from afar, and becoming fitted for our life in a way we knew not. " Alone, I said, from earlier than I know,
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Immersed in rich foreshadowings of the world I loved the woman ; he that doth not, lives A drowning life, besotted in sweet self, Or pines in sad experience worse than death."  — Tennyson. MARRIAGE. 307 And this, be it remembered, in spite of Benedict's criticism that we must be discours-ing of the loves of the angels, and not of flesh and blood on earth.
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