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What We Brought Into This World

What We Brought Into This World

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Published by glennpease
BY ELWOOD WORCESTER

For we brought nothing into this world with us and it is certain
we can carry nothing out. I Tim. 6 : 7.
BY ELWOOD WORCESTER

For we brought nothing into this world with us and it is certain
we can carry nothing out. I Tim. 6 : 7.

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Published by: glennpease on Dec 06, 2013
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12/06/2013

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WHAT WE BROUGHT INTO THIS WORLD BY ELWOOD WORCESTER For we brought nothing into this world with us and it is certain we can carry nothing out. I Tim. 6 : 7. There is a sense in which these words are profoundly true. The child enters this world naked and helpless enough. Its first utterance is a cry, its claim upon mankind is its weakness, its only power of expression is the expression of a want. And as man enters so he departs. "Naked," said Job, "came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither." Whatever our possessions, whatever our worldly honors, powers, privileges, distinc-tions, we cannot take them with us. At the cold touch of Death they fall from us as if they had never been ours. As we came so we must go. Prince or pauper, sage or 181 ^
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THE ISSUES OF LIFE simpleton, all bow to the same law and are subject to the same fate, and over the coffin of one as of the other religion repeats the same message, "We brought nothing mto the world and it is certain we can carry nothing out." It is true men, shocked by the suddenness of this stripping, have sought to evade it. Terrified by the thought of the dead man's poverty, they have placed a few things in the coffin or beside the grave in the hope that they, at least, would accompany the dead man on his way. But the food remains untasted, the dead hand no longer grasps the bow or spear, the silver and the gold remain behind amid the general cor-ruption. Our possessions may accompany us to the grave, then they cease. **]\Ian," says the Talmud, "is born with his hands
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clenched; he dies with his hands wide open. 182 WHAT WE BROUGHT INTO THIS WORLD Entering the world he desires to grasp everything; departing, all that he had has slipped from him." So Alexander the Great is said to have directed that one of his hands should be allowed to protrude from his coffin in order that all might see that he who had held the world in his grasp departed empty-handed. There is something in this thought which takes hold of the dullest imagination. This is the text from which Job and Omar, Eccle-siastes and Hans Holbein, Moliere and Heine preached their great sermon on the vanity of human life. Disguise it as we will, forget it when we can, our possessions are
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