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Classroom Management

Classroom Management

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Published by Michael King
It should be the goal of every teacher assessment process to provide support for continual professional growth and progressive assistance to areas that do not meet professional standards. To be effective in assessing teacher performance principals must have a continued dialogue with teachers that reinforce high standards of professional practices and constantly acknowledge what teachers do well. The Reflective Process is grounded in the measurable domains of teaching and learning. The reflective process is a fixing of the thoughts on the careful consideration for teaching that can be used for many purposes, but the reflective process for teacher assessment will provide a ground work for school districts, and Universities who are interested in enhancing teaching practices.
It should be the goal of every teacher assessment process to provide support for continual professional growth and progressive assistance to areas that do not meet professional standards. To be effective in assessing teacher performance principals must have a continued dialogue with teachers that reinforce high standards of professional practices and constantly acknowledge what teachers do well. The Reflective Process is grounded in the measurable domains of teaching and learning. The reflective process is a fixing of the thoughts on the careful consideration for teaching that can be used for many purposes, but the reflective process for teacher assessment will provide a ground work for school districts, and Universities who are interested in enhancing teaching practices.

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Published by: Michael King on Aug 25, 2009
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Domain Two: Managing the Classroom Environment
Sample Walkthrough Reflective Assessment Form
ByMichael D. Kingdigitalsandbox1@gmail.com
Permission Must Be Granted before Using
Overview
Classroom environment represents the organizational function of the teacher. Certain tasks that affectclassroom environment are performed in a variety of settings as a result of the teacher’s individual beliefs.It is what the teacher does to organize daily learning. It includes setting expectations for behavior, providing support in the development of a positive self-concept, realizing the individual differences of each student, and grouping students within the classroom based on prescriptive learning needs. Theclassroom teacher makes daily decision on constructing the environment. These decisions can be brokendown into four distinct quadrants that are separated by time, aggregation, achievement and behavior asrepresented in (Figure 3-1 The Four Quadrants of Classroom Climate). How teachers construct their dailydecisions on any one of these quadrants can have major effects on student learning and classroomenvironment.For example under aggregate decision making the teacher does not take into consideration the socialmake up of the classroom and allows students to set independently on their own. The effects of thisaggregate decision making on classroom environment may result in off task interaction among students,low engagement for under achieving students, and student dominance during guided practice; givingmuch attention to some and less attention to others. Likewise if a teacher fails to consider time decisionsduring transitions from one classroom event to another through lack of structuring statements studentacademic learning time is lost.A teacher should be cognizant of classroom climate and the effects on student learning. Evaluators shouldalso support teachers in construction classroom climates that are focused on maximizing studentachievement. In chapter three each of the four quadrants will be explored, defining the process of classroom environment decisions and how to assess each one separately. Additionally a full discussion of the definitions for managing the classroom environment will be outlined as well as methods for assessingteacher performance. The eight areas within the four quadrants listed below are major factors in affectinghow students learn in the classroom and should become a focus of teacher performance assessment.
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Figure 3-1The Four Quadrants of Classroom Climate
It is the teacher who establishes the classroom environment which is the set norms for students as theywork toward learning goals. The teacher, through skilled decisions, coordinates the pacing of learningtasks, delegates responsibilities, gives directions for movement within the classroom, enforces theclassroom rules, and allocates resources. A teacher’s ability to run an orderly and academically focusedclassroom has direct and immediate effects on the quality of both teaching and learning. Classroomenvironment is, therefore, an important method of instruction and should not be treated inconsequentially by evaluators.Evaluators are responsible for assessing classroom environment. For instance, one important aspect of classroom environment is the teacher’s ability to establish a positive climate by designing a clearlywritten discipline plan for student behavior that includes both consequences and rewards. Often teachersdesign a set of rules with consequences for inappropriate behavior but do not include how they willreward appropriate behavior. An effective discipline plan supports the development of a positive self-concept within the individual students. Other areas of classroom management assessment include themanner in which cooperative learning strategies are implemented, the kind of treatment differential between students who the teacher perceives as high and low learners, conducting classroom routines in a business- like manner, the management of transition times and how the teacher sets and maintains the pace for instruction.
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Aggregate Decisions
Room ArrangementGrouping Students
Time Decisions
TransitionsPacing
Achievement Decisions
ExpectationsClimate
Behavior Decisions
Student Behavior Teacher Behavior 
Classroom Environment
 
Arrangement of Furniture and Use of Physical Resources
The arrangement of furniture in a classroom can have an effect on learning and teachers preference ondelivering instruction. Room arrangements, placement of classroom furniture and student seating provisions reflects the teachers’ style of teaching. By changing the physical space in a classroom teacherscan facilitate student interaction, activity structure, learning centers, and student transitions. Theclassroom furniture has a direct relationship in facilitating learning functions and can be identified inthree basic formations, rows, circles, and clusters.The traditional formation of classroom seating is rows and columns. When classrooms are organized inrows the teacher wants the attention focused in one direction, usually toward a podium or teachers desk.This type of formal classroom arrangement indicates less student to student collaboration and moreteacher directed instruction. It is important to note that classroom seating arrangements to encouragestudent collaboration has a tendency to decline in secondary settings.The circle arrangement of student seating is useful for class discussions and independent seatwork. Thecircle formation allows students to view each other from across the class and helps teacher monitoring of seatwork. The downside of the circle classroom seating arrangement is that some students will face theteachers back during presentations and demonstrations. Semicircles best fits room arrangements for classroom discussions with the teacher making direct eye contact with students.Student seating cluster furniture arrangements are useful for cooperative learning, collaborativeinstruction, group discussions, or project based task where students use learning time to interact. Thecluster seating arrangement is prominent in those classrooms where teachers provide time for students towork cooperatively on activities and grouping of students is part of the learning structure.
Strategies for Assessing Arrangement of Furniture and Use of Physical Resources
To assess teacher performance in the use of physical resources the principal would observe the classroomin terms of where desk are located and teacher’s. For example, the evaluator conducts a walkthroughobservation and recognizes that two students are isolated in the back corner of the room while the teacher is providing a guided lesson. During the guided lesson the teacher interacts with the class on importantinformation that is needed to complete the assignment while having little interaction with the students inthe back of the room.In this case the evaluator would want to address the guided activity by making a reflective statement suchas; “I liked the way you demonstrated each step of the math problem while asking students to give their own ideas. I noticed that there was a lot of participation with students in the front of the room where the
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