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12-12-13

12-12-13

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Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Dec 12, 2013
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All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2BCROSSWORD 5ACRYPTOQUIPS 5AOPINION 4ASPORTS 1BSUDOKU 5A
Sunny. Zero percent chance of rain. Wind SSW at 15 mph.
To have a great winter break.
IndexDon’t forgetToday’s Weather
Sunny side-up.
HI: 41LO: 26
 
The art of selling
Student artists find local success at Final FridaysOxford Dictionary names ‘selfie’ word of the year
 Whats the word?
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
PAGE 5APAGE 6A
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
 Volume 126 Issue 61
kansan.com
 Thursday, December 12, 2013
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
WEEKEND
 
In a week, final exams will be over. Freshmen, sophomores and juniors will all celebrate until classes resume in January, but this isn’t an option or one group o students. Leading up to graduation, many seniors are acing difficult decisions as their undergraduate careers come to a close. Essentially, those who are leaving the comort o general electives and a somewhat stress-ree lie as an undergrad are aced with three options: Find gainul employment, continue with postgraduate education or struggle to find “real work.”Ann Hartley, associate director o career networks at the University Career Center, said no matter what path graduates end up on, they need to begin preparation or lie afer graduation beore they leave the University. “Tere’s a lot o things that take place beore even starting the job search or graduate school,” she said. “Whether that’s updating your resume or doing interview practice, that’s something you need to start beore you even begin getting into your search.”Former and present students spoke with the Kansan to help provide insight into what can be expected when heading down one o these paths afer graduation.
FINDING A JOB 
Kris Velasco, who graduated last May, stepped oot in New York City or the first time in his lie this summer on his way to his first adult job. Afer graduating with degrees in Political Science and Sociology, Velasco got a job as a Development Coordinator with Te Supply, a start-up company that works to improve the lives o urban youths. Velasco said he’s enjoyed his time with the new organization so ar, but that graduates should prepare themselves or a change in their social lie when they get a real job.“One thing that no one really preps you on is the difficulty o making new riends,” Velasco said. “When you’re out o college and in the real world, you’re kind o out o your bubble now and the ability to meet people is really difficult. alking with other recent grads, this is a common theme we all seem to share.”Velasco learned o the opportunity rom proessor Neeli Bendapudi, the dean o the School o Business, and said proessionals like her can be vital in the post-graduate job search.“Having a mentor or talking to proessors and things like that will really be beneficial to people,” he said. “People who are well connected will know stuff and know people you wouldn’t necessarily know about.”Ann Hartley, associate director o career networks at the University Career Center, reiterated that those who want to find jobs need to be networking, especially online.“Getting out and doing more networking is important beore you graduate,” she said. “It seems like most employers are using LinkedIn, so make sure you have a profile and it is active and up to date and that you’re going out and trying to connect with employers through LinkedIn.”
UNABLE TO FIND WORK 
Unortunately, immediate success stories like Velasco’s aren’t guaranteed. Some students are unable to find a job in their preerred career path and have to resort to part-time work.“For me, it just got to the point where I realized that I had to take whatever I could get afer graduating,” said Coulter Cranston, who graduated with a degree in Chemistry last May. “You just take something and use that as a source o income while you look or a job in your field.”Cranston struggled to find work in his field afer applying or multiple positions, and eventually settled or a job as a sales associate at the KU Bookstore in July. Afer working there or a couple months, a ull-time position opened up at Health Care Access Clinic where he had previously worked as a volunteer. Afer a difficult interviewing process, he was awarded the position. He said the most difficult part o the whole process was eeling like his our years o schooling had not paid off, but he understood it was necessary to bite the bullet and earn a paycheck, no matter the size. “It’s difficult to put pride aside and settle afer working so hard or a degree,” Cranston said. “But you’ll be glad you have a source o income while you keep looking, though.”For graduates like Cranston who are struggling to find a job right out o the gates, Hartley again suggested that constant networking and communication in your chosen field is crucial.“Finding a way to get ace-to-ace and talk with somebody is important,” Hartley said. “O course there’s not any guarantee, but you need to make sure you’re trying to connect with as many people possible in a lot o different ways.”
POST-GRADUATE EDUCATION 
Miranda Fields, a senior rom Shawnee, finally got the letter she was waiting or: One rom the KU School o Medicine. “I walked in and I saw the letter sitting on the counter and my stomach just dropped,” Fields said. “I picked it up and it was thicker, and I said to mysel ‘Tey don’t send multiple sheets just telling you no,’ so I tore into it, read the first line and just started screaming.”Fields’ acceptance into medical school was the culmination o years o prep-work, including months o studying or the MCA,  volunteering at hospitals and filling out tedious applications. She said those who wish to continue on with their education afer graduation, whether it be medical school, law school or  just graduate school, need to be prepared rom the start o their college careers. “I remember sending my mom a text my sophomore year when all my riends got to go out or stop day, and I was still studying Organic Chemistry. I said, ‘I just want to be a doctor so bad, I really hope this pays off,’ and that’s the mentality you have to have,” she said. “When your riends are going out and doing other things, you have to study and be dedicated because what you do as a reshman and sophomore matters.”Hartley said some students don’t consider post-undergrad education as seriously as Fields did, which can cause trouble down the road. She recommends going to graduate school only i it’s part o a specific career plan, not just delay entering the adult-world. “I you’re just going to grad school or law school because you don’t have a plan, it may or may not be beneficial to you,” she said. “I tell students to really research that careully, really talk to olks about it and commit to it and make sure it’s going to be a benefit or you, because you’re going to spend a lot o money and a couple extra years in school and i you still don’t have a plan, you may find yoursel unemployed coming out.”
— Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell 
STUDENT SENATE PASSES FUNDING REFORM BILLS 
Student Senate is on its targeted budget afer passing $5,280 at Wednesday night’s meeting with $24,215 lef in this year’s budget.Student Senate has a smaller budget this year than in years past, because enrollment is down and less money was lef over afer last spring.“Where last year we were able to und student groups a lot more, we have to look a little bit more critically at what we und,” said Drew Harger, Student Senate treasurer and a junior rom McPherson.
BLOCK ALLOCATIONS AND CAMPUS FEES TO BE REVIEWED EVERY YEAR 
Student Senate voted 49-0-4 to allow the campus ee review subcommittee to review every year instead o every other year.
What:
 Last day of classes
When:
 All day
Where:
All University
What:
SUA and the KU Memorial Unions Present Tea @ Three
When:
 3 to 4 p.m.
Where:
 Kansas Union Lobby, Level 4
About:
Free tea and treats
What:
 Stop Day
When:
 All day
Where:
 All University
About:
 No classes held or assignments due
What:
 Establishing and Nurturing Teams
When:
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where:
 International Room, Kansas Union
About:
 Workshop presented by Human Resources
What:
 School of Engineering Fall Recog-nition Event
When:
 9 to 10:30 a.m.
Where:
 Murphy Hall, Crafton-Preyer Theatre
About:
 School of Engineering commence-ment ceremony and reception
What:
 School of Business Fall Recogni-tion Event
When:
 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Where:
 The Lied Center of Performing Arts
About:
 School of Business commence-ment ceremony
What:
 Art Cart: African Masquerade
When:
 Noon to 4 p.m.
Where:
 Spencer Museum of Art
About:
 Mask-making activities to learn about African art
What:
 College of Liberal Arts and Science Fall Recognition Event
When:
 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Where:
 The Lied Center of Performing Arts
About:
 College of Liberal Arts and Sci-ence commencement ceremony
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison KohnDylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTBusiness manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren ArmendarizHayley JozwiakElise ReuterMadison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole AnnebergAllyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS Media director and content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2013PAGE 2ACONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: KansanNewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
 Jay?
 What’s the
FridaySaturdaySundayHI: 41HI: 30HI: 42LO: 22LO: 12LO: 24
— weather.com 
Rainy. 50 percent chance of rain. Wind SSE at 10 mph.
 
Cloudy. 10 percent chance of rain. Wind NNW at 15 mph.Partly cloudy. 10 percent chance of rain. Wind WSW at 10 mph.
Rainy, rainy, rainy.Cloudy, cloudy, cloudy.Twenty-four, Dumbledore.
Calendar
Thursday, Dec. 12Friday, Dec. 13Saturday, Dec. 14Sunday, Dec. 15
dreams can come true. now open until 3am.
(785) 843-8650
or
 (785) 841-7096
1410 Kasold DR.(Bob Billings and Kasold DR.)Sun: 11am-MidnightMon: 11am-10pmTue-Wed: 11-MidnightThu-Sat: 11am-3am
    
   
CAMPUS
Students discuss post-grad plans 
CODY KUIPER
ckuiper@kansan.com 
STUDENT SENATE
Senate passes funding reform, campus fee bill
EMILY DONOVAN
edonovan@kansan.com 
SEE SENATE PAGE 7A
 
FOLLOW @KansanNews ON TWITTER
 
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2013THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSANPAGE 3A
POLICE REPORTS
Enjoy Stop Day and good luck on finals, Jayhawks! If you are looking for especially good study spaces during finals week, Anschutz Library and the Union are two of the best.A 25-year-old male was arrested yesterday on the 1200 block of 23rd Street on suspicion of violating a protective order, criminal threat and interfering with the duties of an officer. A $7,500 bond was paid.A 25-year-old female was arrested yesterday on the 600 block of Mississippi Street on suspicion of operating a vehicle under the influence, second offense, and no insurance. A $1,100 bond was paid.
— Emily Donovan 
Information based on the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office booking recap.
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ANSAN.COM UDKP UDKA
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LAWRENCE
Keep heat on while away to avoid pipe bursts 
ASHLEIGH LEE/KANSAN
By turning off the heat over long periods of time, the homeowner risks the major damage of pipes rupturing due to freezing temperatures.
TOM QUINLAN
tquinlan@kansan.com 
CAMPUS
Prepare dorms, apartments for winter break
KAITLYN KLEIN
kklein@kansan.com 
Tough students will get to en- joy a month ree rom the stress o campus lie and classes, the University won’t shut down while students are away. KU Student Housing will use the extra time that students are away to maintain and deep clean acil-ities. Doug Carter, associate direc-tor o operations or KU Student Housing, said in addition to rou-tine preventative maintenance and cleaning, Lewis Hall’s Academic Resource Center will be upgraded.emplin’s ARC was updated last summer and Ellsworth Hall will receive an update in summer 2014. “Winter break, summer break, spring break are all windows o opportunity we have to do small projects and to do some preven-tative maintenance work,” Carter said. Student Housing acilities will also go through a saety check this winter. Students who live in stu-dent housing are given a checklist o how their rooms must be lefover the extended break. Some o those items can also be applicable to students who live off campus.
— Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell 
Take everything you need for break (dorms are locked during the break) Close and latch windows tightlyLeave window blinds down with the slats openRemove trashUnplug all electrical itemsTurn thermostats or blowers to lowTurn lights offClose and lock doorsTurn off (and unplug) electronics Clear fridge of perishable foodsTake out the trashLower thermostat, but keep above 55 degrees Set lights on timer (or turn off)Close and lock windows and doorsCheck your mail one last time before you leave Do NOT leave a spare key hidden outsideStore your valuables in a safe place
— Residence Hall Vacation Safety Check form (provided by KU Student Housing) — Modified from Travelers Insurance’s Vacation Checklist 
Dorm Winter Break ChecklistApartment Checklist
Imagine coming home rom win-ter break only to find your house or apartment completely flooded. I students aren’t careul this could be a very real possibility. A student who turns off the heat while away over the break risks major damage to their residence. With no heat, the temperature in an apartment or house can dip be-low reezing. At such low temperatures the water inside pipes reezes and expands. Te expansion o ice ruptures the pipes causing flood-ing. Tis can easily be avoided i students simply remember to keep their heat on while they are away.Austin Enns, a second-year law student rom Hutchinson, knows the rustration o ruptured plumb-ing. “I’ve had pipes explode on me be-ore. Yeah, it’s terrible,” Enns said. Enns explained he had a pipe in a dishwasher burst during a snow-storm but his roommate managed to repair it quickly to avoid major damage. Owner o Vito’s Plumbing, Mike Capra, explained that this kind o damage can easily run into the thousands o dollars. He recalled a house that sustained $85,000 dol-lars in damage afer having a pipe burst while the occupants were on vacation. According to Capra it can take a week to clean up the damage beore a person can move back into their apartment or house. aylor Hahn, assistant proper-ty manager o Campus Court at Naismith, said broken pipes aren’t  very common occurrence as res-idents are reminded to keep their heat on while they are away. Hahn explained that most lease agreements include terms re-quiring tenants to keep the heat at a minimal level during winter months. While different tenants have different lease agreements, residents are generally required to keep their apartments at 55 to 60 degrees. Hahn added that i a tenant has a pipe burst, they are re-sponsible or damage that may oc-cur to their neighbors’ apartments. Capra cautioned that i students orget to keep their heat on, they should be prepared or the damage. “I they shut it off, get ready,” Capra said.
— Edited by Sarah Kramer 

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