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Titanic - Letters From the Titanic and Carpathia - 1912

Titanic - Letters From the Titanic and Carpathia - 1912

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Published by Clyde Steamers
Essentially included in a 'memoriam' to the life of Dorset mining engineer Henry Forbes Julian, written by his wife Hester in 1914, the letters here tell some of the story of the sinking of the Titanic and the Carpathia's rescue of some of the survivors.
Essentially included in a 'memoriam' to the life of Dorset mining engineer Henry Forbes Julian, written by his wife Hester in 1914, the letters here tell some of the story of the sinking of the Titanic and the Carpathia's rescue of some of the survivors.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Clyde Steamers on Aug 28, 2009
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01/29/2011

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Painting of the 'Capathia' by Sam Brown
LETTERS FROM TITANIC and CARPATHIA - 1912 -
Essentially included in a 'memoriam' to the life of Dorset mining engineer Henry Forbes Julian, written by his wife Hesterin 1914, the letters here tell some of the story of the sinking of the Titanic and the Carpathia's rescue of some of thesurvivors.
LETTERS FROM THE TITANIC AND THE CARPATHIA 
 THE R.M.S. Titanic was due to sail on her maiden voyage early on Wednesday, April 10th. It was found on inquiry that thejourney from Torquay to Southampton would be unusually slow on account of the suspension of several trains owing tothe Coal Strike. The steeplechases at Torquay on Easter Tuesday, April 9th, also added locally to the confusion andcongestion of traffic. His wife therefore asked him whether he could postpone the journey one day and leave England on Thursday, the nth, being transferred to the Celtic, of the White Star Line, which sailed from Liverpool on that date. Hereplied :I should like it much better, as the Celtic is a slower boat and I should have a longer time at sea, which I always enjoy, but Ifear it might inconvenience the firm if I went later.His wife suggested that, as he had been already obliged to alter his arrangements so as to await the proofs for theirconvenience, one additional day could scarcely matter, but, always averse to giving trouble to others, he felt he could makeno further alteration.His friends Mr. Myers and Dr. Cumming, and his wife's elder sister, Mrs. Maxwell, who called on Good Friday and EasterEve, asked him if he preferred travelling on the new vessel."Not in the least," he replied. "I do not care at all for the palm-court and gymnasium and such extra attractions and never visited them when coming home last time on the Mauretania. I shall keep to the smoking-room and library, and only justlook over the vessel before starting."
 
2 Whilst in London he had been unwell with a feverish chill, and it was not without concern that his wife thought of hisembarking on a fresh expedition whilst still suffering from the effects of illness.Leaving Torquay soon after midday on Tuesday, April 9th, the following extract from a letter to her written the sameevening describes his journey.
South-Western Hotel
,
Southampton
 
9th April
,
1912
. The journey, with four changes, thirty-five minutes at Newton and forty-five at Exeter, made me think that it would havebeen too much for you in your present state of health. At Salisbury all the luggage for the boat was put into a special van, which was attached to the train. At Romsey this was disconnected and attached to the Southampton train, so that we hadno trouble. I arrived here at 8.25.... I think it was wiser for you not to take the risk (of coming), as it is really very cold, with a strong wind. ... At Exeter there were about twenty trunks for the Titanic, mostly second- and third-class passengers. Writing to his sister-in-law, Mrs. Maxwell, from the R.M.S. Titanic at Southampton, he describes the steamer, and explainsthat he had been too closely occupied on Easter Monday correcting proofs to be enabled to visit her, for he had been working up to the very last with his accustomed vigour. He also regrets that his wife's recent attack of influenza hadprevented her from accompanying him to the States.
Southampton
 
On board R.M.S. Titanic10th April
,
1912
.I was very sorry not to have been able to see you again before leaving Torquay. I was " rushed " up to the end. I left by the1.35 train and got to Southampton at 8.25 —not bad for these times. This is the most wonderful ship I have ever seen;"palatial " is not the word for it. It is a marvel. Everything is spick and span even to the stewards and stewardesses. AH theother great ships in the docks look mere cockle-shells. All it wants ... is darling Hetty, but it would have been too risky forher so soon after the " flue."His wife received from him three letters written on board the Titanic, one bearing the Southampton postmark and theother two that of Queens town. The first gives some account of the vessel.
SouthamptonOn board R.M.S. Titanic10th April
,
1912
.I have just been over the ship and seen all the sitting and saloon-rooms. It is all most luxurious. . . . The decks aremagnificent, and the enclosed ones are fitted up more like smoking-rooms. My cabin is not the one shown ... on theOlympic plan. ... It is, however, more like a small bedroom than a ship's cabin. ... If only you could have got safely to theship, I know you would love to have the voyage. ... So far there are very few people on board, but the London train has notyet arrived. ... I left the hotel at 10 o'clock and walked to the ship, a matter of only ten minutes. My trunks were takencharge of by the South- western man, who sent them to the ship and put them into my cabin. I want you to take great careof yourself. . . . Do everything that is possible to get rid of the influenza, and then I shall feel happier about leaving you. . . . After the vessel had taken on passengers and mails at Cherbourg the same evening he wrote again, describing an incident which cast a gloom over the starting for the disastrous voyage.
On board R.M.S. Titanic10th April
,
1912
 I was delighted to get your nice long letter and the telegram just after leaving the dock. Our ship had some trouble ingetting away. There are a great many large steamers lying in the docks on account of the Coal Strike, among them being thefour American liners and the Oceanic. The New York, which was secured to the Oceanic, broke loose, due to the back-
 
3rush of water from the Titanic as she was moving past. Tugs rushed to the assistance and succeeded in holding the New  York, which was moored to another part of the dock in order that we might move away without doing damage to otherboats. This delayed us, and we did not reach Cherbourg until 7 instead of 6. There were great crowds watching us leave, but very few strangers were allowed on board.I have now explored the ship, except the Turkish bath and the swimming-bath. The Parisian cafe is quite a novelty andlooks very real. I do not know to what extent it is patronized, but it will, no doubt, become popular amongst rich Americans. . . . There are two bands, one in the lounge and the other in the cafe. I also visited the gymnasium, which is fullof the most wonderful machines, which cure all the aches that flesh is heir to. There are over three hundred first-saloonpassengers on board — a large proportion being Americans. The weather has been fine, but cool and more or less cloudy. I expect we shall reach Queenstown about 7 in the morning,and I don't suppose they will give us time to write in answer to yours, so I am writing this evening. . . . The following morning (Thursday) he wrote again before reaching Queenstown, and also sent a cable saying he had justmet on the vessel his friend Colonel John Weir.
On board R.M.S. Titanic11th April
,
1912
. We do not arrive at Queenstown until about noon, which gives me an opportunity of writing again. I had a good night and was very comfortable. The ship is so steady that it is almost the same as being on land. More than half the officers andstewards on board are familiar faces to me, as they are taken from the Adriatic and Oceanic. The two deck-stewardsremembered me quite well, and allotted me a chair in a select part of the deck. This is a brilliant morning and quite warm. ... I think if you could only have reached the ship safely you would have been allright, for there are practically no draughts. Revolving doors are much in use, which prevent any through currents of air. Inthe smoking-room there is a big fireplace, which makes it cosy. The other rooms also have fireplaces, but have imitationfires heated by electricity; they are poor things compared with the real article. . . . The bands are unusually good. ... I willfeel happy with the thought that you are taking care of yourself at "Redholme." . . .
 This was the last letter his wife ever received from him
.Leaving Queenstown soon after two o'clock, the steamer had the coast in view until dusk. The final sight of land from the Titanic was of the green hill-sides and rugged cliffs of Ireland, where his boyhood had been passed. The memories of hisclosing week on earth were of the home of his married life and the loved district of The West of England.Descended from a long line of sailors and living by the sea and loving it, the present writer had always gladly accompaniedher husband on his voyages; nor had she ever previously felt any anxiety about him when on the ocean. But on the night of Sunday, April 14th, after retiring to rest she was filled with some presentiment of coming evil and felt too anxious to beable to sleep. Rising up again before midnight, she continued for a long time reading prayers, especially those appointed tobe used at sea. Eagerly inquiring the next morning from the servants if any news had come and scanning the papers, she was temporarily reassured, for the intelligence of the catastrophe did not reach her until the afternoon. But surely a guiding influence must have directed her thoughts, and some projection of the mind into space must have enabled her in somemysterious way to hold communion with one far distant in the icy regions of the North Atlantic, whose spirit beforetranslation was expanding into a freer, fuller state.It was afterwards a source of solace to believe that she had been permitted to be thus especially near to him in thought andprayer during those last solemn and supreme hours of existence.Permission has kindly been given to include the letters of one of the ladies amongst the surviving British first-class saloonpassengers, picked up by the Carpathia from the Titanic boats. These letters (being written by an eye-witness to a nearrelative immediately after the catastrophe) are specially worthy of note.

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