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4612050 Facilitators Train the Trainer Handbook

4612050 Facilitators Train the Trainer Handbook

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Published by Bernard A Ekoh

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Published by: Bernard A Ekoh on Aug 28, 2009
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06/30/2013

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FACILITATOR’S TRAIN-THE-TRAINER HANDBOOK 
Page 1 of 21
 Cristopher Alvin De Guzman
FACILITATOR’S TRAIN-THE-TRAINER HANDBOOK 
CHAPTER IPRINCIPLES OF ADULT EDUCATIONINTRODUCTION
Learning is a lifelong process in which experience leads to changes within the individual. Infact, learning is often defined as a change in behaviour resulting from experience. In short,learning means change!Good training or facilitating doesn’t just happen. Good facilitation skills are acquiredthrough preparation, experience, and evaluation. Through frank self-assessment, andfeedback from others, effective facilitators build on their strengths and learn from theirmistakes. As well, good training reflects the practical application of principles of adulteducation.The following adult learning principles will help you gain a better understanding of howadults learn.
GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF ADULT LEARNING
Adults usually learn best when:
 
The purpose of training is clear and satisfies an immediate need, (i.e. it is relevant tocurrent challenges). Participants usually decide what they will learn and want toidentify their expectations as they relate to the course.
 
They participate actively in the learning process. Adults possess a wealth of experience and knowledge; they are a valuable resource as well as a learner.
 
New facts and insights are connected to and build upon what they already know.
 
The specific goal of the learning activity is clear and participants understand what isexpected from them.
 
FACILITATOR’S TRAIN-THE-TRAINER HANDBOOK 
Page 2 of 21
 Cristopher Alvin De Guzman
 
When feedback is direct and frequent. Participants want to know how well they areprogressing. They prefer, however, to be able to recognize their progress through self-evaluation.
 
Taking risks and making mistakes is part of the learning process.
 
Participants are respected and listened to.
SUGGESTED APPLICATIONS OF LEARNINGPRINCIPLES
You can increase your effectiveness by applying these principles in the following ways:
 
Organizing and making available the widest possible variety of resources for learning.
 
Helping to clarify the course learning objectives and also responding to the individuallearning needs of each participant.
 
Not only giving feedback, but encouraging, accepting and responding to feedback yourself.
 
Actively listening and responding to non-verbal messages.
 
Being familiar with subject material.
 
Quickly learning names of participants and using them.
 
Admitting when you don’t know the answer to a question, but also following-up(researching and providing a response).
Additional Applications Include:
 
Building on the experience of individual participants and the group.
 
Being punctual, organized, friendly, relaxed and enthusiastic.
 
Welcoming questions and inviting the participation of everyone.
 
Giving clear directions when introducing exercises.
 
Following up on exercises to help participants gain more from them.
 
Responding to participant needs, but also keeping on track.
 
Maintaining your sense of humour.
 
Using audio-visual aids/techniques effectively.
 
Avoiding sexist or foul language and tasteless jokes.
 
Doing what you say you will do.
 
FACILITATOR’S TRAIN-THE-TRAINER HANDBOOK 
Page 3 of 21
 Cristopher Alvin De Guzman
CHAPTER IIPLANNING AND COURSE PREPARATION
COURSE FACILITIES
A training program of the highest design and quality, instructed by the most experienced andenlightened facilitator can fall short of its objectives by the barriers which occur when training takesplace in an unsuitable facility.The quality of training can suffer because:
 
A telephone (fixed or cellular) in the room rang intermittently.
 
The screen could not be seen by all participants.
 
Lighting was inadequate.
 
The chairs were uncomfortable.
 
The room was too small for the number of registered participants.
 
The room you booked is being used by someone else.Try to anticipate the unexpected. There is nothing worse than having a classroom full of participants and an instructional program that cannot proceed due to a facilities related problem.
LOCATION
Arrange for a location that will satisfy the following requirements:
 
A horseshoe or table (rounds) arrangement to comfortably accommodate participants withsufficient space for tables for handout materials. (see diagrams at the end of this chapter).
 
Sufficient wall space to post charts, posters and completed flip chart pages.
 
Quiet, comfortable environment, good climate control, ventilation, lighting, and removedfrom noise or other potential distractions.</FONT< li>
Classroom Preparation:
Ensure you have the following audio-visual equipment, and that it is operational:
 
Screen.
 
LCD / Overhead projector with extra bulb.

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