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Are You Talking to Me? by Brian Solis

Are You Talking to Me? by Brian Solis

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Published by Brian Solis
A changing of the guard is due and it starts with the cognizance of to whom we serve and report. While technically, we answer to our business leaders and the board that governs their activity and performance, when we embrace anything with an outward focus, we must recognize and acknowledge our customers, peers, and prospects – in their voice, words, and sentiments. Doing so, changes everything.
A changing of the guard is due and it starts with the cognizance of to whom we serve and report. While technically, we answer to our business leaders and the board that governs their activity and performance, when we embrace anything with an outward focus, we must recognize and acknowledge our customers, peers, and prospects – in their voice, words, and sentiments. Doing so, changes everything.

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Published by: Brian Solis on Sep 02, 2009
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09/01/2009

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Are You Talking to Me?
By Brian Solis, blogger at  PR 2.0  and principal of FutureWorksPR, Co- Author Putting the Public Back in Public Relationsand Now Is Gone
I’ve been spending a fair amount of time touring the world in support of  my ideas and thoughts on the direction of new PR, branding, service, and marketing communications. My reward andinspiration to continue is sourced from each person I meet and the experiences and challenges theyshare. I’ve learned that our greatest hindrance to evolve is not our unwillingness to do so, our indoctrination in new media and communications is truly obstructed by the executives to whom wereport and serve.I see it in the eyes of those communications professionals so willing and anxious to learn. The futureof marketing, communications, and media indeed lies in their ambition and dedication to originatingand practicing more ethical and meaningful strategy and engagement. Our journey is often divertedby the mistakes of those individuals who have yet to realize that their beliefs and methodologies arearchaic, ineffective and inevitably ruinous.Acceptance is the first step to recovery.
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
Realizing that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to relevance is the second step.That “power” in this case is the recognition of “who” we serve and attempt to help.The fundamental flaw with almost every marketing initiative is in its conception. Who it serves andseeks to appease is habitually off target.The top-down routine that holds many business and marketing executives captive is the reality of theinfrastructure, rules, and reward parameters we define. And, while they may lead to profitability, their effects can also lead to the degradation of perception, value, and worth associated with “marketers”and “PR” as industries.Deservedly?Sometimes.Necessary?No.There is no one formula for driving profitability.A changing of the guard is due and it starts with the cognizance of to whom we serve and report.While technically, we answer to our business leaders and the board that governs their activity andperformance, when we embrace anything with an outward focus, we must recognize andacknowledge our customers, peers, and prospects – in their voice, words, and sentiments. Doing so,changes everything.Case in point…Good friend, Robin Wauters over at TechCrunch recently wrote apoignant and revealing postthatchronicled the latest in a seemingly endless history of frustrations with press releases and thehyperbole and incoherency rife throughout many.His post served as a clever plea to strike unnecessary and overused words from press releasesincluding, but not limited to:
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
1. Leading, Leader 2. Best, Most, Fastest, Largest, Biggest3. Innovative, Innovation4. Revolutionary5. Award-Winning6. Disruptive, Disruption, (added: Market Disruptor)7. Cutting, Bleeding Edge8. Next-Generation9. Strategic Partnership10. SynergyAnd of course, David Meerman Scott has also published TheGobbledygook Manifesto. At the veryleast, this clever and helpful guide should serve as required reading for anyone in marketing andcommunications. Copies should also appear anonymously on the desks of those executives towhom either intentionally or unconsciously inpire and sign off on these useless documents.Honestly, who speaks this way? Remember, before we’re marketers, we’re human beings andconsumers. We don’t communicate with our friends, peers, and family in this language. Yet, wereinforce these stereotypes with every piece of marketing collateral and press release we write anddistribute.
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis

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