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Chapter One Issue Questions, New World Beginnings, APUSH

Chapter One Issue Questions, New World Beginnings, APUSH

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Published by Julie
The Issue Questions set for Chapter 1.
The Issue Questions set for Chapter 1.

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Published by: Julie on Sep 04, 2009
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09/15/2010

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http://guidesbyjulie.blogspot.com/APUSH
Chapter One: New World Beginnings
1.1.1.1.
 
What factors contributed to the emergence of the U.S. as a political and socialWhat factors contributed to the emergence of the U.S. as a political and socialWhat factors contributed to the emergence of the U.S. as a political and socialWhat factors contributed to the emergence of the U.S. as a political and socialexperiment?experiment?experiment?experiment?Colonists were unhappy with the “taxation without representation” that wasbeing imposed on them by England.As a result, the United States became a functioning experiment of past politicaltheories, as put forth by Locke, Montesquieu, and Voltaire.Locke: The right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of property” and the socialcontractMontesquieu: Freedom is possible through the separation of powers into thelegislative, judicial, and executive branches along with a system of checksand balancesVoltaire: Freedom of speech2.2.2.2.
 
How did climate change affect the geographic evolution of AmericanHow did climate change affect the geographic evolution of AmericanHow did climate change affect the geographic evolution of AmericanHow did climate change affect the geographic evolution of Americansettlement?settlement?settlement?settlement?The Great Ice Age exposed a land bridge, Beringia, across the Bering Strait,allowing Asian nomads to trek across to the Americas for some 250 centuries.The land bridge then closed for thousands of years, resulting in the formationof unique cultures, cut off from the rest of the world.Other factors include El Nino3.3.3.3.
 
What factor dominated the capacity of Native Americans to establish complexWhat factor dominated the capacity of Native Americans to establish complexWhat factor dominated the capacity of Native Americans to establish complexWhat factor dominated the capacity of Native Americans to establish complexsocial structures?social structures?social structures?social structures?The controlling factor was the development of agriculture, principally, maize.It was only when corn was cultivated that large societies could function, sinceit was needed to feed the greater amount of peopleExamples of complex social structures include:Incans in Peru, Mayans in Central America, and Aztecs in Mexico: all hadcomplex agricultural techniquesAmerican SW: the Pueblo peoples in the Rio Grande valley with irrigationsystems and multistoried villages.4.4.4.4.
 
How did European and Native American concepts of land use differ?How did European and Native American concepts of land use differ?How did European and Native American concepts of land use differ?How did European and Native American concepts of land use differ?Native Americans saw nature as sacred and equal, only taking what wasnecessary, while Europeans were more wasteful and focused on profits orpure entertainment.Native Americans found more value in preserving the environment and growingcrops, while the Europeans were interested in precious metals and fur withwhich to send back to Europe.Europeans used commercial farming with cash crops such as sugar, while NativeAmericans were more of subsistence farmers, growing beans/squash/maize.
 
http://guidesbyjulie.blogspot.com/APUSH
Chapter One: New World Beginnings
5.5.5.5.
 
What issues and events within European history and culture caused theWhat issues and events within European history and culture caused theWhat issues and events within European history and culture caused theWhat issues and events within European history and culture caused theefforts that led to the “discovery” of the “New Woefforts that led to the “discovery” of the “New Woefforts that led to the “discovery” of the “New Woefforts that led to the “discovery” of the “New World”?rld”?rld”?rld”?Europeans began initiating contact with the rest of the world for conquest andtrade. Resulted in trips to Asia, Africa, and New World.Crusaders from 11
th
-14
th
century went to Holy Land and were exposed to goodsuch as silk, drugs, perfumes, spices, and sugar.Eastern luxuries extremely expensive in Europe, due to distances overseas andon caravan routes, with Middle Eastern middlemen exacting heavy toll.Europeans eager to find less expensive route to Asia or find alternate supplies.In 1295, Marco Polo’s tales of China served as an impetus for voyages.6.6.6.6.
 
What contributions were made by the Portuguese towards the “opening” ofWhat contributions were made by the Portuguese towards the “opening” ofWhat contributions were made by the Portuguese towards the “opening” ofWhat contributions were made by the Portuguese towards the “opening” ofAfrica?Africa?Africa?Africa?1450-Portuguese mariners developed the caravel (could sail more closely intowind)Found prevailing westward breezes off the coast of Africa that could takethem home.Portuguese set up trading posts along African shore for purchase of gold andslaves. Built up sugar plantations on African coastal islands.7.7.7.7.
 
Why did Spain began to supplant Portugal as the dominant nation in explorationWhy did Spain began to supplant Portugal as the dominant nation in explorationWhy did Spain began to supplant Portugal as the dominant nation in explorationWhy did Spain began to supplant Portugal as the dominant nation in explorationand colonization?and colonization?and colonization?and colonization?In 1492, last Moor stronghold of Granada fell, Reconquista completed.Spaniards now united and eager to outstrip the Portuguese in the race forwealth.Since the Portuguese already controlled the African coast, Spain was eager tosearch westward.Spain had unity, wealth, and power – possible to discover, conquer, and colonizenew lands.After Columbus’ discovery, The Treaty of Tordesillas awarded all of the NewWorld to Spain except for Brazil. Thus, the stage was set for Spain tobecome the dominant exploring/colonizing power in the 1500s.8.8.8.8.
 
In what respect was Columbus a “successful failure”?In what respect was Columbus a “successful failure”?In what respect was Columbus a “successful failure”?In what respect was Columbus a “successful failure”?His original goal: to find a new water route to the Indies
he certainly failed inthis aspect.However, he indirectly discovered two new continents
The New World. Thisdiscovery led to enormous changes as European countries raced to explore thecontinents. Also established international commerce – Columbian Exchange.9.9.9.9.
 
What was the economic interrelationship between Europe, Africa, and theWhat was the economic interrelationship between Europe, Africa, and theWhat was the economic interrelationship between Europe, Africa, and theWhat was the economic interrelationship between Europe, Africa, and theAmericas?Americas?Americas?Americas?
 
http://guidesbyjulie.blogspot.com/APUSH
Chapter One: New World Beginnings
Africa provided slave labor for the New World in exchange for small amounts offinished product.The New World, using the slave labor, produced gold, silver, and new crops suchas tobacco, maize, beans, chocolate, and pineapple. Sugar, brought to the NewWorld from Europe, was also a cash crop.The Old World introduced wheat, sugar, rice, coffee, horses, cows, and pigs tothe New World.A less beneficial exchange involved that of diseases. Syphilis came to Europefrom the New World, while Europeans brought smallpox, measles, plague,influenza, and diphtheria.10.10.10.10.
 
What are some of the examples of cultural borrowing between Europe and theWhat are some of the examples of cultural borrowing between Europe and theWhat are some of the examples of cultural borrowing between Europe and theWhat are some of the examples of cultural borrowing between Europe and theAmericas?Americas?Americas?Americas?Staple crops such as potatoes supported the rapid population growth in Europe.Africa also benefited from New World foodstuffs such as maize, manioc, andsweet potato.American Indian tribes such as Apaches, Sioux, and Blackfoot adopted thehorse, changing their cultures into mobile hunter societies that purued buffalo.11.11.11.11.
 
Why were NWhy were NWhy were NWhy were Native Americans so vulnerable to European diseases? ...ative Americans so vulnerable to European diseases? ...ative Americans so vulnerable to European diseases? ...ative Americans so vulnerable to European diseases? ...WWWWith whatith whatith whatith whateffect?effect?effect?effect?Millennia of isolation in the Americas resulted in the Native Americans’ loss ofprotective antibodies from common Old World illnesses such as smallpox, yellowfever, and malaria.As a result, 90% of Native Americans perished.In the case of the Taino natives of Hispaniola, their population dwindled from 1million to 200 within 50 years of the Spanish arrival.12.12.12.12.
 
What imWhat imWhat imWhat impact did the importation of Americans silver have on the Europeanpact did the importation of Americans silver have on the Europeanpact did the importation of Americans silver have on the Europeanpact did the importation of Americans silver have on the Europeaneconomy?economy?economy?economy? By 1600, Spain was full of New World silver (from mines at Potosi in Bolivia,and Mexico). Resulted in price revolution in Europe that increased consumercosts by as much as 500% in hundred years after mid 1550s.Some believe this indirectly started capitalism.Influx of bullion laid foundations for modern commercial banking system andstimulated spread of commerce and manufacturing.Paid for international trade with Asia.13.13.13.13.
 
What wasWhat wasWhat wasWhat was the geographic extent of the Spanish “New World” claims?the geographic extent of the Spanish “New World” claims?the geographic extent of the Spanish “New World” claims?the geographic extent of the Spanish “New World” claims?The treaty of Tordesillas awarded the Spanish all of the New World except Brazil, which went to Portugal.

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