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20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

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3.7

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A graphic novel adaptation of Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea from Campfire.

A mysterious sea monster has been creating havoc in the ocean. Ships of all shapes and sizes, as well as humans, have been destroyed by this enigma! No corner of the earth has been spared from its terror, as it continues to kill all who cross its path.

In reaction to this destructive force, the US Government wastes no time in sending out a team of experienced professionals to track down and destroy it. Professor Pierre Aronnax, a marine biologist; Conseil, his faithful assistant; and Ned Land, a Canadian master harpooner, come together in an epic hunt.

On board a naval ship, the Abraham Lincoln, the three men set out to track down this terrifying beast of the ocean. But, will they succeed? And what will they discover if they do?

Published in 1870, originally in French, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is a classic example of the imagination and foresight of Jules Verne. His pioneering approach to writing in the late 19th century led many to refer to him as the father of science fiction.
A graphic novel adaptation of Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea from Campfire.

A mysterious sea monster has been creating havoc in the ocean. Ships of all shapes and sizes, as well as humans, have been destroyed by this enigma! No corner of the earth has been spared from its terror, as it continues to kill all who cross its path.

In reaction to this destructive force, the US Government wastes no time in sending out a team of experienced professionals to track down and destroy it. Professor Pierre Aronnax, a marine biologist; Conseil, his faithful assistant; and Ned Land, a Canadian master harpooner, come together in an epic hunt.

On board a naval ship, the Abraham Lincoln, the three men set out to track down this terrifying beast of the ocean. But, will they succeed? And what will they discover if they do?

Published in 1870, originally in French, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is a classic example of the imagination and foresight of Jules Verne. His pioneering approach to writing in the late 19th century led many to refer to him as the father of science fiction.

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Published by: Graphic Novels Campfire on Sep 04, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9788190696364
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srboone reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Vernes undersea adventure is an amazing trip that I've taken many times. Although history has proven his vision to be incorrect on many occasions in this yarn, it is still a mesmerizing odyssey. One of my favorite books.
fkarr_2 reviewed this
simplistic, technological, oft-times unbelievable, but still entertaining though long-winded
melanti_1 reviewed this
Rated 2/5
I think this is the 19th century version of the Discovery Channel, with a bit of plot thrown in here and there.

This must have been a fantastical book when it was first written. In the infancy of submarines and electricity, all of this must have been incredibly far fetched, and it's amazing to me how much is accurate predictions.

The long lists and descriptions of fish and animals, I assume, was equally incredible to the people of that day, who'd probably never heard of most of these fish, let alone seen drawings of them. But for me, who's seen some of that in person while scuba diving, and seen a lot of photographs and video of underwater life, the lists of common names and scientific nomenclature just doesn't work anymore.

I did like the plot and the characters, but interspersed as it was between all the long lists, and engineering calculations, this book just hasn't aged well at all.
csayban reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I am so divided on my feelings about Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. Starting with the positive, it was a groundbreaking novel when it was published in 1870. It foretold many pieces of technology that didn’t even exist including portable electric lights, SCUBA equipment and the centerpiece of the story, the submarine. Verne really was a pioneer of what we now know as Science Fiction storytelling. He also captures the character of Captain Nemo by making him so multidimensional. He is a scientist and adventurer who loves his crew like children and is a gracious host. But he is also a vengeful, dark, brooding madman. Verne captures that conflict so well.However, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea in many ways is a burden to read. The lion’s share of the story involves listening to Pierre Aronnax catalog every animal, vegetable, mineral, island, sea or line of latitude or longitude he comes across. Page after page of zoological classifications and atmospheric observations slows the story to a crawl. In all honesty, the missing element of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea is a good editor. Half of the text could be cut out without losing one single element of the story.I feel that Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea is an important work that everyone should read, if for no other reason than to see the birth of a genre. But I can’t say that it is a really enjoyable story to read. It is a flawed execution of a brilliant concept.
tronella_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Another episodic book full of lists! But I didn't enjoy it quite as much as Moby Dick; the lists in that one were at least about a range of different things, but I can only read so many names of fish species before I start to fall asleep. I did mostly enjoy this one, especially because it's science fiction where the sciences that are fictionalised are like... electric motors and submarine construction. The chapter where they argue about whether electricity is as good as steam was particularly entertaining.The manservant Conseil did start to get on my nerves a bit towards the end, around the "if only I didn't have to breathe to leave more air for Master" section.
kazhout reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I first read this book when I was eight. While my classmates were rushing against one another to bring home Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys, I was devouring our library's collection of Verne and Sherlock Holmes books. They were thick, with huge prints and illustrations - clearly intended for kids. One time, I took out a book in the morning, read it during breaktimes, then returned it in the afternoon of that same day before I went home.Of all the titles in that collection, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea ended up being my favorite. So, more than ten years later, when I saw it again in the bookstore, I knew I just had to relive the adventure again. It had been a light and fast read in that small, thick book from third grade, so I certainly didn't expect it to be long and, frankly speaking, quite dragging in its unabridged form. That said, it was still a better adventure than before. If Verne didn't expound too much on the sea creature naming, this book would've been paced faster, but less believable too since he wrote it in a professor's point of view.In all, I still loved it and I look forward to re-reading his two other books that I first read a decade ago: Around The World In 80 Days, and A Journey to the Center of the Earth.
icefirestorm reviewed this
Rated 3/5
A good story, a little slow at times but it never stops moving entirely. It was interesting to see how people viewed our ecology in the past. I would reccomend reading it with a dictionary at hand as the main character is a zoologist and uses terms not familiar to the common man. All in all, I'm glad I read it.
mikedraper reviewed this
Rated 3/5
In 1866 there are a number of sightings of an unexplained object in the ocean. Some of these objects are far apart and with no other explanation, it is thought that it might be a sea monster.An expedition is established with the U.S. Naval frigate Abraham Lincoln under command of Captain Farragut. They are determined to find this sea monster and deal with it.Professor Pierre Aronnax of the Museum of Paris had written articles about this phenomenon of a possible sea monsgter and he his asked to join the others, along with his man Conseil and Canadian harpooner, Ned Land.Once they are out to sea and have traveled far in search of this monster, something is sighted and a small boat is launched. Ned Land is ready with his harpoon and Pierre and Conseil are with him. Ned realizes that this object is not a monster as their boat is swamped and they are picked up by the submarine, the Nautilus under Captain Nemo.They are kept in gentle captivity as the Nautilus travels around the world with Captain Nemo commenting as they reach various places. Pierre also comments on some of the things they find, such as a sunken ship with treasure aboard.The style of writing is dry and without much emotional comment. The style was so different from today's writing that It was challenging to get involved with the story.Jules Verne had some excellent ideas such as the deep sea diving equipment but when the Nautilus is said to go 20,000 leagues under the sea, that is more than the circumference of the earth.It was interesting to see where writing has changed in the last one hundred years and the changes in science fiction writing.
schmerguls reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I read this because it was on a list of Great Classics. I saw the movie long ago but did not remember much of it. I thought the title meant 20,000 leagues down! It seems Captain Nemo and Professor Aronnax (and Conneil and Ned land ) went on a submarine for 20,000 leagues, often under the sea's surfacce. It has some exciting things, especially when they almost die at the South Pole. This book is nnotated, and corrects some things in the standard English translation. The sequel is The Mysterius sland, but I don't think I have to read it. Verne wrote 65 books. I think I've read enough bny him.
lreinardy08 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I liked the book because I AM fascinated by the sea, but everyone is right, the details of EVERYTHING are awful to sit through. You completely forget where you are in the "story" after pages and pages of detail on a fish, or a rock. A tough read, but a nice fantasy story. I personally don't think the details and monotony were NEARLY as awful as say Moby Dick, but they were pretty bad.

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