Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Saving an Iranian Christian

Saving an Iranian Christian

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3|Likes:
Published by Vienna1683
Pastor Nadarkhani was arrested in Rasht in October 2009 when he questioned the mandatory Islamic religious instruction to Iranian children. He did not want his two children taught values that he did not believe in himself. He was interrogated, tortured, and charged with apostasy. Yousef was sentenced to death. His wife was sentenced to life in prison, which, in Iran, may be worse than her husband’s fate.
The Iranian Supreme Court charged Nadarkhani with “apostasy”, meaning, according to Islamic law, the rejection of one’s former religion from a person who was a follower of Islam. Is conversion to another religion wrong? Is it punishable by death? The Constitution of Iran supposedly recognizes Christianity as a “protected religious minority”. Nadarkhani never accepted Islam and never practiced it; however, apostasy law in Iran applies to those with “Muslim ancestry.” How does an Iranian man born to a Muslim family prove himself innocent of apostasy? Is lying and claiming he accepts the religion of his ancestors the only way to escape his unjust punishment? When asked to return to “the religion of his ancestors,” Yousef replied, “I cannot.”
Pastor Nadarkhani was arrested in Rasht in October 2009 when he questioned the mandatory Islamic religious instruction to Iranian children. He did not want his two children taught values that he did not believe in himself. He was interrogated, tortured, and charged with apostasy. Yousef was sentenced to death. His wife was sentenced to life in prison, which, in Iran, may be worse than her husband’s fate.
The Iranian Supreme Court charged Nadarkhani with “apostasy”, meaning, according to Islamic law, the rejection of one’s former religion from a person who was a follower of Islam. Is conversion to another religion wrong? Is it punishable by death? The Constitution of Iran supposedly recognizes Christianity as a “protected religious minority”. Nadarkhani never accepted Islam and never practiced it; however, apostasy law in Iran applies to those with “Muslim ancestry.” How does an Iranian man born to a Muslim family prove himself innocent of apostasy? Is lying and claiming he accepts the religion of his ancestors the only way to escape his unjust punishment? When asked to return to “the religion of his ancestors,” Yousef replied, “I cannot.”

More info:

Published by: Vienna1683 on Dec 28, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/28/2013

pdf

text

original

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->