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Master of Mystery in 4 Volumes

Master of Mystery in 4 Volumes

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Published by kapeed999@lycos.com
Mystery, horror
Mystery, horror

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Published by: kapeed999@lycos.com on Sep 06, 2009
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02/07/2013

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Mystery In Four Volumes, by Various
Project Gutenberg's Masterpieces of Mystery In Four Volumes, by Various This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.orgTitle: Masterpieces of Mystery In Four Volumes Mystic-Humorous StoriesAuthor: VariousEditor: Joseph Lewis FrenchRelease Date: November 10, 2007 [EBook #23432]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MASTERPIECES OF MYSTERY ***Produced by David Clarke and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This filewas produced from images generously made available by The Internet Archive/American Libraries.)Transcriber's Note: Minor typographical errors have been corrected without note. Dialect spellings,contractions and discrepancies have been retained.
Mystery In Four Volumes, by Various1
 
Masterpieces of Mystery
 In Four Volumes
MYSTIC-HUMOROUS STORIESEdited byJoseph Lewis French[Illustration]Garden City New York Doubleday, Page & Company 1922COPYRIGHT, 1920, BY DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INCLUDINGTHAT OF TRANSLATION INTO FOREIGN LANGUAGES, INCLUDING THE SCANDINAVIANPRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES AT THE COUNTRY LIFE PRESS, GARDEN CITY, N.Y.NOTEThe Editor desires especially to acknowledge assistance in granting the use of original material, and forhelpful advice and suggestion, to Professor Brander Matthews of Columbia University, to Mrs. AnnaKatherine Green Rohlfs, to Cleveland Moffett, to Arthur Reeve, creator of "Craig Kennedy," to Wilbur DanielSteele, to Ralph Adams Cram, to Chester Bailey Fernando, to Brian Brown, to Mrs. Lillian M. Robins of thepublisher's office, and to Charles E. Farrington of the Brooklyn Public Library.FOREWORDThere is an intermediate ground between our knowledge of life and the unknown which is readily conceivedas covered by the term
mysticism
. Mystery stories of high rank often fall under this general classification.They are neither of earth, heaven nor Hades, but may partake of either. In the hands of a master they present attimes a rare, if even upon occasion, unduly thrilling--aesthetic charm. The examples which it has beenpossible to gather within the space of this volume are offered as the best of their type.The humorist, thank heaven, we have always with us. Spectres cannot afright him, nor mundane terrors deflecthim from his path. He takes nothing either in earth or heaven seriously, as is his God-given right. Some of thebest examples of what he has done in the general field of mystery are presented here for the first time in anycollection.JOSEPH LEWIS FRENCH.CONTENTSPAGEI. MAY-DAY EVE 3
Algernon Blackwood 
II. THE DIAMOND LENS 38
Fitz-James O'Brien
III. THE MUMMY'S FOOT 77
Théopile Gautier 
Mystery In Four Volumes, by Various2
 
IV. MR. BLOKE'S ITEM 96
Mark Twain
V. A GHOST 101
Lafcadio Hearn
VI. THE MAN WHO WENT TOO FAR 109
E. F. Benson
VII. CHAN TOW THE HIGHROB 143
Chester Bailey Fernando
VIII. THE INMOST LIGHT 158
Arthur Machen
IX. THE SECRET OF GORESTHORPE GRANGE 203
A. Conan Doyle
X. THE MAN WITH THE PALE EYES 230
Guy de Maupassant 
XI. THE RIVAL GHOSTS 238
Brander Matthews
Masterpieces of MysteryMYSTIC-HUMOROUS STORIESMAY DAY EVEAlgernon BlackwoodIIt was in the spring when I at last found time from the hospital work to visit my friend, the old folk-lorist, inhis country isolation, and I rather chuckled to myself, because in my bag I was taking down a book that utterlyrefuted all his tiresome pet theories of magic and the powers of the soul.These theories were many and various, and had often troubled me. In the first place, I scorned them forprofessional reasons, and, in the second, because I had never been able to argue quite well enough to convinceor to shake his faith, in even the smallest details, and any scientific knowledge I brought to bear only fed himwith confirmatory data. To find such a book, therefore, and to know that it was safely in my bag, wrapped upin brown paper and addressed to him, was a deep and satisfactory joy, and I speculated a good deal during the journey how he would deal with the overwhelming arguments it contained against the existence of anyimportant region outside the world of sensory perceptions.Speculative, too, I was whether his visionary habits and absorbing experiments would permit him toremember my arrival at all, and I was accordingly relieved to hear from the solitary porter that the "professor"had sent a "veeckle" to meet me, and that I was thus free to send my bag and walk the four miles to the houseacross the hills.It was a calm, windless evening, just after sunset, the air warm and scented, and delightfully still. The train,already sinking into distance, carried away with it the noise of crowds and cities and the last suggestions of the stressful life behind me, and from the little station on the moorland I stepped at once into the world of silent, growing things, tinkling sheep-bells, shepherds, and wild, desolate spaces.My path lay diagonally across the turfy hills. It slanted a mile or so to the summit, wandered vaguely anothertwo miles among gorse-bushes along the crest, passed Tom Bassett's cottage by the pines, and then droppedsharply down on the other side through rather thin woods to the ancient house where the old folk-lorist livedand dreamed himself into his impossible world of theory and fantasy. I fell to thinking busily about him
Mystery In Four Volumes, by Various3

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