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Lord Inverclyde's Yachts

Lord Inverclyde's Yachts

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Published by Skelmorlie
On the evening of Saturday, June 22, 1878, Mr John Burns and his wife, along with sixteen guests, left the private jetty below Castle Wemyss to board Burns' new steamer, the "Mastiff", for a sixteen day cruise to Iceland - The success of the expedition on the "Mastiff" seems to have enthused Burns to build himself a yacht and, as fortune would have it, Burns was able to employ one Alexander Wilson, formerly yachtmaster to James 'Paraffin' Young of Kelly House, Wemyss Bay - In all, the successive members of the Inverclyde family would own eight yachts over the course of the next forty years, these all fairly typical of their time and some indeed having quite interesting stories to tell.
On the evening of Saturday, June 22, 1878, Mr John Burns and his wife, along with sixteen guests, left the private jetty below Castle Wemyss to board Burns' new steamer, the "Mastiff", for a sixteen day cruise to Iceland - The success of the expedition on the "Mastiff" seems to have enthused Burns to build himself a yacht and, as fortune would have it, Burns was able to employ one Alexander Wilson, formerly yachtmaster to James 'Paraffin' Young of Kelly House, Wemyss Bay - In all, the successive members of the Inverclyde family would own eight yachts over the course of the next forty years, these all fairly typical of their time and some indeed having quite interesting stories to tell.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Skelmorlie on Sep 07, 2009
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09/06/2009

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Burns' new mail steamer
"
Mastiff 
"
lying off Reykjavik in June 1878
Lord Inverclyde's Yachts
On the evening of Saturday, June 22, 1878, Mr John Burns and his wife, along with sixteenguests, left the private jetty below Castle Wemyss to board Burns' new mail steamer "Mastiff"for a sixteen day cruise to Iceland, the story of their cruise recorded by Anthony Trollope in a96-page book, "How The Mastiffs Went to Iceland".1
 
The
"
Mastiff 
"
at Ardrossan
 The 230-foot long, 871 ton, "Mastiff" was built by by J. & G. Thompson of Clydebank forMessrs. G. & J. Burns' Irish mail service and was fitted with a two cylinder steam compoundengine - In 1906, she was bought by Gibralter's Bland Line who, renaming her the "GibelDersa", ran her on the ferry service to Tangier until 1923, when she was withdrawn andscrapped at Genoa. The party returned to Wemyss Bay around 3 pm on Monday July 8, 1878 and, afterstrawberries and cream at Castle Wemyss, Burns' guests went their separate ways, "inmelancholy humour" says Trollope. The success of the expedition on the "Mastiff" seems to have enthused Burns to build himself a yacht and, as fortune would have it, Burns was able to employ one Alexander Wilson,formerly yachtmaster to James 'Paraffin' Young of Kelly House, Wemyss Bay, Young retiringfrom from yachting and disposing of his schooner 'Nyanza', she built by Robert Steele & Co. of Greenock in 1867 and, along with the 'Oimara', one of the first Clyde-built 'composite' yachts.In all, the successive members of the Inverclyde family would own eight yachts over thecourse of the next forty years, these all fairly typical of their time and some indeed havingquite interesting stories to tell.
Matador
220 tonsJohn Burns1879 - 1880 The 'Matador', rigged as an auxiliary 'steam schooner', was sold to a Col. Campbell of Glasgow in 1881 and then to one R. C. T. Blunt of Glasgow who had her until 1885, hertonnage increased under his ownership to 233 tons - She then disappears from The Royal Yacht Squadron list until 1888 when owned by one Capt. J. H. Bainbridge, R.N., he seeminglydisposing of her in 1900.
 Jacamar
451 tons John Burns1882 - 1883
Capercailzie
(I) 522 tonsSir John Burns Bart 18911883 -18902
 
Emily Burns
,
in hat
,
the 1st Lady Inverclyde
,
she the daughter of George Arbuthnotwho had builtSkelmorlie's 'Beach House' in 1844
,
the photograph taken on the after deck of the1892-built
"
Capercailze
(
II
)"
Capercailzie
(II) 722 tonsSir John Burns Bt. and 1st Lord Inverclyde 1898 - 19001892 - 18972nd Lord Inverclyde 1901 -1905 The steel screw schooner Capercailzie (II) was designed and built by Barclay, Curle & Co. atGlasgow in 1892, she was registered at 566 tons gross, 308 net tons and 772 Thames tons,measured 229 feet in length with a 27 foot beam and, engined by her builders, was given apair of steam compound engines.Inherited by the 2nd Lord Inverclyde upon his father's death in 1900, he kept her until 1904when she was sold to Mr. Davison Dalziel of Grosvenor Place, London. He retained her nameand kept her until 1912 when she was sold to the Italian government who renamed her"Archimede" and employed her in a variety of roles as an armed patrol vessel. Captured byAustrian forces at Odessa in March 1918 but retaken by the Italians at Sevastopol thatNovember, she was subsequently rearmed with 2 - 3 inch guns and remained in service untilscrapped in 1928.Note - Burns' Yachtmaster Alexander Wilson retired in 1896 due to a heart condition, hefinally expiring in 1906 at the age of 69.3

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