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Mar-Apr 2008, Managing Population Growth is a Key Component to Stability and Sustainability

Mar-Apr 2008, Managing Population Growth is a Key Component to Stability and Sustainability

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Published by Philip Nalangan
The world population has increased from 2.5 billion in 1950 to 6.8 in 2007. Evidence highlights that human activity and conduct is producing significant global climate change, with serious implications on public health. To educate and inform on population growth, climate change and their impacts, the Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) and AFPPD-Malaysia organized the 24th Asian Parliamentarians’ Meeting on Population and Development on April 26-27 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The meeting was attended by 70 parliamentarians and policymakers from Asia-Pacific.
The world population has increased from 2.5 billion in 1950 to 6.8 in 2007. Evidence highlights that human activity and conduct is producing significant global climate change, with serious implications on public health. To educate and inform on population growth, climate change and their impacts, the Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) and AFPPD-Malaysia organized the 24th Asian Parliamentarians’ Meeting on Population and Development on April 26-27 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The meeting was attended by 70 parliamentarians and policymakers from Asia-Pacific.

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Published by: Philip Nalangan on Sep 08, 2009
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March - April 2008Publication of the Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development
F
orum
 
N
ewsletter
 
asian
 
In her opening remarks, Ms. KayokoShimizu, acting Chair of APDA, saidthat the, “G8 Summit addresses globalchallenges, including the world economyand African issues; but this time, it willfocus on environmental challengesby highlighting climate change andits implications. We should have anAsian consensus in this meeting toserve as the basis of discussion atthe G8 International Parliamentarians’Conference on Population andSustainable Development, to be heldin Tokyo by July”.A message from Prime Minister YasuoFukuda of Japan, Chair of AFPPD,APDA, and the Japan Parliamentarians’Federation for Population (JPFP), wasdelivered by Ms. Chieko Nohno, MP(Japan). He stated, “Mankind facespressing challenges in the future: globalwarming, climate change, extremepoverty and the threat of new and re-emerging pandemic. As globalizationproceeds and the world populationcontinues to grow, international effortsare essential if we are to overcome thesetasks and to create a society whereevery person can live in dignity”.Mr. Ahmad Husni Mohamad Hanadziah,Deputy Minister of Finance andChair of AFPPD-Malaysia, urgedparliamentarians to discuss all factorsand concerns to ensure balanced
population growth that benets every
person. “There is shortage in foodsupply due to the conversion of landfrom agricultural to industrial. It is onyour shoulders to find out prudentand practical ways to tackle the worldissues on climate change, diseases andpopulation”, he added.Mr. Liow Tiong Lai, Minister of Health inMalaysia, narrated that his governmenthas taken mitigation and adaptivemeasures through various ministries,agencies and NGOs. “These effortsenable Malaysia to mobilize adequatefood supplies, to provide shelters, andto reduce morbidity and mortality dueto natural disasters and accompanyingdiseases. In Malaysia, our strength inmitigating the effects of climate changelies in our healthcare infrastructures anddelivery network. With the commitmentby the government, we will continue onthe implementation of various mitigationmeasures”, he informed.Mr. Garimella Giridhar, Representativeof UNFPA-CST, Bangkok urgedgovernments to integrate demographicfactors into environmental impactassessments, to promote sustainableresource management, to modifyunsustainable consumption andproduction patterns, and to pay particular attention to ecologically vulnerableareas where population, economicactivity and environmental issues areconcentrated.
Managing Population Growth is a Key Component to Stabilityand Sustainability
24th APDA-AFPPD Asian Parliamentarians’ Meeting on Climate Change and Health at Kuala Lumpur 
The world population has increased from 2.5 billion in 1950 to 6.8 in 2007. Evidence highlights that human activity and 
conduct is producing signicant global climate change, with serious implications on public health. To educate and informon population growth, climate change and their impacts, the Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) and  AFPPD-Malaysia organized the 24th Asian Parliamentarians’ Meeting on Population and Development on April 26-27 in KualaLumpur, Malaysia. The meeting was attended by 70 parliamentarians and policymakers from Asia-Pacic.
Left to right: Mr. Lakshman Singh, MP (India) and Vice-Chair of AFPPD; Mr. Garimella Giridhar, Representative of UNFPA-CST, Bangkok; Mr. Ahmad Husni Mohamad Hanadziah, DeputyMinister of Finance and Chair of AFPPD-Malaysia; Mr. Liow Tiong Lai, Minister of Health in Malaysia; Ms. Kayoko Shimizu, acting Chair of APDA; and Ms. Wakako Hironaka, acting Chair of JPFPMs. Chieko Nohno, MP (Japan)
International efforts and collaborationare essential to overcome futurechallengesG8 Summit will focus on climatechange and its implicationsDiscuss factors to ensure balanced  population growthMitigation measures in MalaysiaIntegrate demographic factors intoenvironmental impact assessments
 
In a message from Dr. PratBoonyawongvirot, Permanent Secretaryof the Ministry of Public Health inThailand and Secretary-General of AFPPD – delivered by Ms. PuangpenChanprasert, Senior Public HealthTechnical Officer in Thailand – hehighlighted that approximately 600,000deaths occurred worldwide as a resultof weather-related natural disasters inthe 1990s. “Recent studies suggestthat the record high temperaturesof 2003 in Europe were associatedwith an estimated 70,000 deaths.Each year, diarrheal diseases, malariaand malnutrition kill 3 million peopleglobally. Dengue fever is on the rise – it is estimated that up to 80 millionindividuals become infected annually”,he stated.Mr. James Dawos Mamit, MP (Malaysia),presented an interesting overview on theinterrelationship between population,climate change and infectious diseases.He said that climate change is thegreatest threat being faced by the planettoday, with rising temperatures causing
more droughts and oods. The mainhuman inuence on global climate is likely
to be emissions of greenhouse gases,such as carbon dioxide and methane.Increase in average global temperatureimpacts the climate, resulting in alteredprecipitation patterns, meltingglaciers, intensifying stormsand rising sea level.“South Korea is drawingup detailed plans to build alow-carbon society; such asexpanding the use of newand renewable energy, and
enhancing energy efciency.
Many environmental expertsand activists are taking partin urging the South Koreangovernment to take further reduction and adaptationactions”, said Ms. HanMyeong Sook, MP, former PrimeMinister, Environment Minister andChair of the Committee on Populationand Development in South Korea.Mr. Shuzo Nishioka, Senior ResearchFellow of the National Institute for Environmental Studies in Japan,discussed the possible impacts of climate change in Japan. “Extreme dailyprecipitation, including that associatedwith typhoons, will further enhanceover Japan due to the increase inatmospheric moisture. Rice yield inirrigated lowland areas is projected todecrease up to 40 percent”. In Japan,coastal lowlandsare located belowhigh water level,mainly in largecities; a 1 meter rise in sea levelcould put up to4.1 million peopleat risk. It is alsoprojected thatabout 90 percentof the habitat of forest speciescould disappear by the end of thiscentury in Japan.Global warming and fluctuations inweather help to spread diseases.The temperature affects the growthand survival of microbes and vectors.Weather affects the timing and intensityof disease outbreaks. “Climate is theprimary factor in the epidemic of malaria,cholera, dengue, meningococcalmeningitis, Japanese encephalitis,leptospirosis and rickettsial infections”,highlighted by Mr. Hasan Abdul Rahman,Director of the Disease Control Divisionof the Ministry of Public Health inMalaysia.Mr. Jose Rimon, Senior Program
Ofcer of the Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation, presented the impacts of population growth on the sustainabilityand stability of societies. It is estimatedthat nearly 1.5 billion men and womenwill be 20-24 years old by 2015; and if 
these individuals are not able to nd
 jobs, the situation will fuel politicalinstability. “Most urban growth isoccurring in slum areas. Countries withbulging youth population are likely to
experience civil conicts. Competition in
the declining crop land and fresh water 
is also associated with civil conicts”,
he informed.
Left to right: Ms. Puangpen Chanprasert, Senior Public Health Technical Ofcer from Thailand, Dr.Osamu Kusumoto,
Secretary General/Executive Director of APDA, and Mr. James Dawos Mamit, MP (Malaysia)Left to right: Mr. Shuzo Nishioka, Senior Research Fellow of the National Institute for Environ-mental Studies in Japan; Ms. Wakako Hironaka, MP (Japan) and acting Chair of JPFP; andMs. Han Myeong Sook, MP (South Korea), former Prime Minister, Environment Minister andChair of the Committee on Population and Environment in South KoreaMs. Darlene Custodio (left), MP (Philippines) and Treasurer of AFPPD; andMr. Hasan Abdul Rahman (right), Director of the Diseases Control Division of the Ministry of Health in Malaysia
Mr. Jose Rimon, Senior Program Ofcer of the Bill and
Melinda Gates Foundation
Diseases associated with climatechangePopulation, climate change and infectious diseases Adaptation measures inSouth KoreaClimate change impacts in JapanInterrelationship of global warming and infectious diseasesUnemployment fuels political instability 
 
AFPPD’s Executive Committee meeting,under the chairmanship of Ms. WakakoHironaka, MP (Japan) – representingPrime Minister Yasuo Fukuda of Japan, Chair of AFPPD – decidedto mobilize parliamentarians for theInternational Conference on Populationand Development (ICPD)+15 in 2009.A working group of parliamentarianswill be setup to draft a programme for ICPD+15 in 2009.One of the important decisionswas to survey the performance of parliamentarians on ICPD issues –Philippines and India already conductedsuch a survey. The meeting reviewed theAFPPD’s report on advocacy techniquesin working with parliamentarians.Mr. Tolofuaivalelei Falemoe Leiatau,Speaker of Samoa and Chair of thePacific Parliamentary Assembly onPopulation and Development (PPAPD),was elected as the Vice-Chair of AFPPD.The meeting was attended by Mr.Garimella Giridhar, Director of UNFPA-CST, Bangkok; Ms. Raj Karim, RegionalDirector of the International PlannedParenthood Federation-East, SouthEast Asia and Oceania Region; andDr.Osamu Kusumoto, SecretaryGeneral/Executive Director of APDA –apart from member parliamentarians of Australia, India, Indonesia, Philippinesand Thailand.
Survey Parliamentarians’Perormance onReproductive HealthIssues
AFPPD Executive CommitteeMandated ParliamentarianMobilization for ICPD+15
Managing population growth is a keycomponent to stability and sustainability.Almost all surveys worldwide show thatthe approval and support for voluntaryfamily planning is high. Between 1960and 2008, contraceptive prevalence indeveloping countries increased from 9to 45 percent among married womenof reproductive age. However, morethan 200 million women worldwideof reproductive age continue to havean unmet need for family planning.“Addressing population growth will have
a signicant impact on poverty, mortality,diseases and conicts. Communities
are less sustainable if living with high
levels of conict. Societies are more
sustainable when health and socialneeds of the most vulnerable are met”,underlined Mr. Rimon.STIs are associated with serious health,social and economic consequences;and they cause considerable morbidityand mortality. A successful approachusually involves comprehensive sexeducation programmes, adoption of safe sex practices, and early detectionand treatment. Mr. Ho Pak Chung,Regional Chair of the InternationalPlanned Parenthood Federation - East,South East Asia and Oceania Region(IPPF-ESEAOR), urged governmentsto target young people and women inthe prevention strategy, “It is importantthat policy-makers adopt a realistic andnon-judgemental approach”. A panel to discuss the adoption of an APDA-AFPPD Statement for theG8 Summit followed – with Mr. Jose
Rimon, Senior Program Ofcer of the
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation;Ms. Kerry Nettle, MP (Australia);Mr. Chiaki Takahashi, MP (Japan)and Deputy Secretary-General of JPFP; Mr. Tolofuaivalelei FalemoeLeiataua, Speaker of Samoa, Vice-
Chair of AFPPD and Chair of the Pacic
Parliamentary Assembly on Populationand Development; and Ms. Tuti IndarsihLoekman Soetrisno, MP (Indonesia)In her closing address, Ms. Raj Karim,Regional Director of IPPF-ESEAOR,said, “This clearly demonstrates theneed for us to be involved in the
population eld; and to be sensitive,
vigilant and prepared to manage bothimmediate and prolonged effects of anyenvironmental changes that may endup in crisis”.Ms. WakakoHironaka, MP(Japan) and actingChair of JPFP, said,“We have adoptedan inspiring APDA-AFPPD Declaration.While declarationstend to lack focus,ours has a veryclear messagebecause we had a
Left to right: Mr Jose Rimon, Senior Program Ofcer of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Ms. Kerry Nettle, MP (Australia); Mr. Chiaki Takahashi, Deputy Secretary-General of JPFP;
Mr. Tolofuaivalelei Falemoe Leiataua, Speaker of Samoa, Vice-Chair of AFPPD and Chair of PPAPD; and Ms. Tuti Indarsih Loekman Soetrisno, MP (Indonesia)Ms. Donya Aziz, MP (Pakistan) and Mr. Ho Pak Chung, Regional Chair of IPPF-ESEAORMs. Raj Karim, Regional Director of IPPF-ESEAOR
Prevention approaches against STIs APDA-AFPPD statement Impacts of population in stability and sustainability Closing remarks
clear objective to start with. Without thecontributions of parliamentarians fromAsian countries, we could not attain thisoutcome”.

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