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201335710

201335710

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Published by The Myanmar Times

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Published by: The Myanmar Times on Jan 06, 2014
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WWW.MMTIMES.COM ISSUE 710 | DECEMBER 30, 2013 󰀭 JANUARY 5, 2014
1200
Ks.
HEARTBEAT OF THE NATION
Govt, NLD at odds on health
Connect with us
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 @TheMyanmarTimes
email
 newsroom@mmtimes.com
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09 5000 613
NEWS 9
Army whistleblowers in line for amnesty
Committee recommends 12 former Tatmadaw members – including several  jailed for leaking details of a secret North Korea visit – be considered political prisoners and freed.
NEWS 6󰀭7
Pressure builds for UN human rights office
Human rights commission and hluttaw committee say UN rights presence is needed, while EU ambassador insists Myanmar “should not fear the opening of this office”.
BUSINESS 20󰀭21
SPA misses Landmark lease deadline
Singapore-listed Yoma gives Serge Pun & Associates six more months to secure lease extension for downtown site slated for US$400 development.
THE PULSE 34
Skate or die
Skate parks in Mandalay are popping up in record numbers, attracting first-time boarders, bladers and BMX riders. But without a local stable of experts to coach the new generation, the scene could fold before it hits its stride.
 A plan to bring in universal health coverage could become a hot issue in the 2015 election, after the NLD announced it  would introduce the measure within 10 years – half of the 20-year timeframe proposed by the government.
NEWS 3
 YCDC dog culling prompts community anger
 Animal rights activists have labelled a municipal program to poison stray dogs as inhumane and called for reform, as a YCDC official revealed that workers who cull the dogs face regular abuse and even physical attacks from angry residents.
PHOTO: BOOTHEE
PAGE
15
CONSTITUTION REFORM LOBBY HITS THE ROAD
SPECIAL REPORT 14
SKY’S THE LIMIT FOR YANGON REAL ESTATE
SPECIAL REPORT 24
 
2
THE MYANMAR TIMES
DECEMBER 30, 2013 󰀭 JANUARY 5, 2014
online editor
 Kayleigh Long
|
kayleighelong
@gmail.com
 
Page 2
Rope Wizard makes merit
Kyaikhtiyo’s famed pagoda may find it has some new competition, with recent media reports pointing to a unique attraction at the Kyaukhtatkyi Pagoda just several kilometres north of the Golden Rock.
Eleven Media
 last week reported on Min Min, the flying “Rope Wizard”, who risks life and limb by balancing and sliding along a cane rope on his stomach in order to gild the pagoda on behalf of pilgrims. He wears a heavy-duty cloth reinforced shirt, in order to avoid chafing. Min Min’s father Aye Lwin, now 72, began the practice in 1989. He retired some four years ago, leaving his son to take over. Min Min revealed the secrets of his gravity-defying act to
Eleven
:“I only eat vegetables. I always pray to the Nine Attributes of the Buddha. When I was young, I learned how to climb the rope by watching my father. I still haven’t faced any difficulties yet. The main reason I risk my life is for Kyaukhtatkyi Pagoda to look sublime with gold leaves and for the people to have merit.”
Surgeon leaves his mark
A British surgeon has been suspended over allegations that he “branded” his initials onto a patient’s liver, UK media reported last week.Simon Bramhall faces an investigation after a colleague discovered the initials “SB” on the organ during a follow-up operation at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, central England, newspapers said.The hospital’s managing trust said in a statement, “Following an allegation of misconduct, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust has suspended a surgeon while an internal investigation is completed.”
The Daily Mail
 newspaper said Bramhall used non-toxic argon gas to sear his initials onto the liver.
AFP 
“Swarm” of piranha relatives leaves scores injured
A swarm of biting fish injured more than 70 people who were bathing at a popular beach in Argentina on Christmas, say medical officials. A seven-year-old girl had her finger partially amputated and dozens more suffered bite wounds on their extremities from the fish, a relative of the piranha called “palometas”, said Federico Cornier, the director of emergency services in the city of Rosario.“This is not normal,” Cornier said on television. “It’s normal for there to be an isolated bite or injury, but the magnitude in this case was great ... This is an exceptional event.” –
Reuters
Seng Lufor
 NOW!
 magazine.
 Photo:
Htet Aung Kyaw (Studio HAK)
 When Myanmar was Burma...
 Archival material provided by  Pansodan Gallery
An advertisement for cigarettes and typewriters from British publication
Burma To-day,
1944.
THE INSIDER:
 
The local lowdown & best of the web
‘In Myanmar even people do not have enough rights yet … If I tried to discuss animal rights now other MPs would make fun of me.’
Yangon Region representative Daw Nyo Nyo Thin responds to public outcry over YCDC’s dog eradication campaign, explaining why she doesn’t intend to raise the issue in the hluttaw just yet.
MORE ON NEWS 15
An actor plays Mao Zedong in China’s central province of Hunan, to mark the former leader’s 120th birthday.
 
Photo: AFP
 
News 
3
 www.mmtimes.com
NEWS EDITOR:
 Thomas Kean
|
tdkean
@gmail.com
Govt, NLD at odds over health coverage upgrade
UNIVERSAL health coverage appears set to become a political issue in the 2015 election, with the government and the National League for Democracy in agreement on the need to introduce af-fordable coverage for all – but at odds on how and over what period to do it.The World Bank, which is assist-ing the government with its plans, de-scribes universal coverage as ensuring all people obtain the health services they need without suffering financial hardship when paying for them.U Htay Win, director general of the Health Planning Department, said the Ministry of Health expects it will take 20 years – and a massive injection of state and private funding – to replace the decades-old cost-sharing system  with universal health coverage.“Universal health coverage is a very complicated project and we need to  balance the organisation of health in-surance, welfare health organisations and the public,” he told
 The Myanmar Times
 in a recent interview. After decades of underinvestment in health, the challenges for introduc-ing universal health coverage are enor-mous. Many remote populations are entirely cut off from health services; rates of tuberculosis, malaria, and ma-ternal and child mortality are among the highest in Asia. The high and varied  burden, combined with a 20-year de-cline in social-sector spending, presents formidable health policy challenges, particularly for extending services to hard-to-reach populations, analysts say.But providing healthcare coverage for Southeast Asia’s largest country will require more than just careful plan-ning. It will require money - and tough decisions about where this money should come from, said Dr Hnin Hnin Pyne from the World Bank.“It is a social and political decision,” Dr Hnin Hnin Pyne said of deciding on how to implement universal coverage.In contrast to the government, NLD health policy adviser Dr Kyaw Zaw said the opposition party would make uni- versal coverage a priority and introduce it within 10 years if elected, while over the same period increasing total health expenditure more than seven-fold. “We want to implement the project  within a short time by increasing the government budget for public health,” Dr Kyaw Zaw said. “In Myanmar most people are unable to access acceptable health services from the government and they can’t afford to pay for treat-ment.“If the NLD wins the election, they have a plan to increase the government  budget [so that] health expenditure is 15 percent of [gross domestic product],” he said, adding that this would be paid for through taxes on alcohol and cigarettes. Total health expenditure – the amount expended by both the govern-ment and individuals – currently repre-sents 2pc of GDP, U Htay Win said. The government is aiming to incrementally increase this to 5pc – a figure suggest-ed by the World Health Organization (WHO) – by raising state spending,  which in 2012-13 was K386.66 billion, around 0.76pc of GDP and 3.14pc of the total budget. Spending increased more than 29pc in 2013-14, to K499.31 billion. However, there are limits as to how fast both state and private health ex-penditure can be scaled up, U Htay  Win said.“We are a developing [country] so  we cannot support free treatment for all people and people cannot afford to spend a lot of money for health treat-ment.”The funding shortfall would be made up by levying private health in-surance premiums on high-income earners, he said. But developing this form of private health insurance so that it covers the entire country could take at least 20 years, he added. Working with the support of the  World Bank and the WHO, which are providing technical assistance, the government has earmarked maternal and neo-natal services as the priority services to be delivered first under the universal coverage program.Choosing priority services requires an honest assessment of what is need-ed and what can be delivered first through the existing public and private healthcare establishments, taking into account their human resources and in-frastructure, Dr Hnin Hnin Pyne said. While neighbouring Thailand intro-duced a relatively large universal care package of services over about 10 years from 1992, Dr Hnin Hnin Pyne said it did so from much higher level of initial spending. Its total national expenditure on health was estimated at 4.3pc of GDP in 2009 and today Thailand spends about US$174 per capita on health, compared to $2 in Myanmar, she said.In Myanmar, patients end up paying more than 65pc of their healthcare bills out of their own pocket – a payment system that leaves healthcare seekers highly vulnerable to impoverishment or ruin.This can lead people to forgo treat-ment – an unhealthy statistic almost impossible to capture. A functioning universal health care program provides affordable treatment at a cost that is not impoverishing or ruinous, said Dr Sundarajan S Goplan, health adviser to the World Health Or-ganization in Myanmar, said.“This means that if [someone] is on the poverty borderline, they do not fall into poverty due to health expenditure,” Dr Goplan said, “and that if someone is already impoverished they do not incur catastrophic spending on health that is [economically] ruinous.
SHWE YEE SAW MYINTBRIDGET DI CERTO
NLD says it will implement universal health coverage within 10 years if elected, while government – assisted by the World Bank and the WHO – has set a 20-year timeframe
A male patient sits with a relative at Bogale township hospital in Ayeyarwady Region.
Photo: Kaung Htet
29%
Increase in the state health budget in 2013-14, to K499.31 billion
TRADE MARK CAUTION
Ravintoraisio Oy,
of Raisionkaari 55, 21200 Raisio, Finland, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following Trademarks:-
BENECOL
Reg. No. 4/14610/2012Reg. No. 4/14611/2012 Reg. No. 4/14612/2012
in respect of:- “
Class 5
: Nutritional supplements; dietetic substances adapted for medical use, namely, cholesterol-lowering capsules, powders, tablets or chewables containing plant stanol ester, food for babies.
Class 29
: Meat, fish, poultry and game; meat extracts; preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs, milk and milk products, except ice cream, ice milk, and frozen yogurt; edible oils and fats.
Class 30
: Coffee, tea, cocoa, sugar, rice, tapioca, sago, artificial coffee; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely, cereal-based snack foods and drinks, ready-to-eat cereal derived food bars, breakfast cereals, wheat flakes, corn flakes, maize flakes, oat flakes, crisped rice cereals; bread, pastry and confectionery, namely, caramel chew product, ices; honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt, mustard;  vinegar, sauces; spices; ice.
Class 32
: Beers; Mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic beverages, namely, soya-based drinks not being milk substitutes, oat-based beverages not being milk substitutes, beverages containing plant stanol ester, fruit-based beverages, oat-based beverages with fruit juice and milk not for food purposes; fruit beverages and fruit juices; syrups and other preparations for making beverages namely, fruit beverages, soya beverages not being milk substitutes, oat based beverages with fruit juice and milk not for food purposes.Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said Trademarks will be dealt with according to law.
U Nyunt Tin Associates International Limited
Intellectual Property DivisionP.O. Box No. 952, Yangon, Myanmar.Tel: 959 4500 59 247-8, Email: info@untlaw.comFor
Ravintoraisio Oy
Dated: 30 December, 2013.
TRADE MARK CAUTION
GENERAL MOTORS LLC,
a Delaware corporation of 300 Renaissance Center, Detroit, Michigan 48265-3000, U.S.A.,
 
is the Owner of the following Trade Mark:-
B U I C K
Reg. No. 1188/1979
in respect of “Motor driven vehicles of all kinds, motor cars, automobiles, motor trucks, motor lorries and parts thereof and automobile accessories of all kinds . Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Mark will be dealt with according to law.Win Mu Tin, M.A., H.G.P., D.B.Lfor
GENERAL MOTORS LLC
P. O. Box 60, YangonE-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mmDated: 30 December 2013

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