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Pell City Squadron - Mar 2013

Pell City Squadron - Mar 2013

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Civil Air Patrol - Alabama Wing
Civil Air Patrol - Alabama Wing

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Published by: Civil Air Patrol - Unit Newsletters on Jan 06, 2014
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01/06/2014

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1
light Loglight Log 
 
Pell City Composite Squadron 118—Alabama Wing Civil Air Patrol
 
From Our Commander,
 
The only constant is change
 
Have you ever heard this statement made? I certainly have. Many times. There has always, and constantly will be change. Change occurs everywhere. In our work, our school, in our community, in our nation. This is unavoidable.  Anything or anyone that refuses to change is at risk of following the path of the dinosaur. Change is scary. We do not know what the future holds. We want to keep things as they are. Where we are comfortable. The old saying "Better the Devil that you know, than the Devil you don't know" is used as an excuse to resist change. Unfortunately, this is not good, it is not healthy. There will always be resistance to change. This is normal. Resistance is usually caused by not knowing or understanding the need for a particular change. Resistance usually ends up giving way to progress and improvement. There have been significant changes in the way that the CAP operates over the years. There will continue to be changes. We have an opportunity to get a glimpse of what the future holds for the Alabama Wing and for CAP in general at the upcoming Wing Conference. There will be many sessions at the ALWG Conference. Sessions that will show us where we are, where we need to go, and how we plan to get there. We need to get this information so that we can work together to achieve our goals. I want to encourage everyone to make every effort to attend the upcoming Wing Conference. I also want to encourage everyone to take notes and come back and share the information with our members. I would like to have articles from several members about the Wing Conference in our upcoming Newsletters. This will allow us to distribute the most information to the most members. It is great to look back at what we have accomplished, but we must keep looking ahead to avoid obstacles in our path. Keep looking ahead!
 
Jim Gosnell, Commander 
 
Vol. 4, No. 3 March 2013
Squadron Commander— Maj. Jim Gosnell
 
Deputy Commander for Cadet Programs
-
Capt. Cindy Bennett
 
Inside this issue:
Commander’s 1
 
Calendar 
 
2
 
Safety
 
3
 
Safety Newsletter and Volunteer Magazine
 
4
 
Did You Know?
 
5
 
WESS
 
6
 
NESA
 
7
 
Summer Encampment
 
8
-
10
 
Promotions
 
11
 
Character Development
 
12
 
Cadet Focus
 
13
 
Cadet Commander 
 
14
 
Scholarship Info
 
15
-
18
 
Newsletter Editor— Lt. Elizabeth Shurbutt
 
 
2
 
Sun
 
Mon
 
Tue
 
Wed
 
Thu
 
Fri
 
Sat
 
111
 
222
 
333
 
444
 
555
 
666
 
777
 
Cadet Mt. Cadet Mt. Cadet Mt. LeadershipLeadershipLeadership
 
18:0018:0018:00
 
888
 
999
 
101010
 
111111
 
121212
 
Happy Happy Happy Birthday Birthday Birthday Daniel L Daniel L Daniel L SmithSmithSmith
 
131313
 
141414
 
Cadet Mt.Cadet Mt.Cadet Mt.
 
18:00 P.T.18:00 P.T.18:00 P.T.
 
(blues)(blues)(blues)
 
151515
 
161616
 
171717
 
181818
 
191919
 
202020
 
212121
 
Cadet Mt.Cadet Mt.Cadet Mt.
 
18:0018:0018:00
 
Character Character Character DevelopmentDevelopmentDevelopment
 
222222
 
232323
 
242424
 
252525
 
262626
 
Christian Christian Christian NorwoodNorwoodNorwood
 
272727
 
282828
 
Cadet Mt.Cadet Mt.Cadet Mt.
 
18:0018:0018:00
 
AerospaceAerospaceAerospace
 
292929
 
March 2013March 2013 
Calendar . . . Page 2
 
Cadet Schedule and Uniform for March 2013:
 
March 7 Leadership (Blues)
 
March — P.T. 18:00 at Lakeside Park
 
March 21—Character Development (BDU’s)
 
March 28—Aerospace (BDU’s)
 
March 22—24—WESS
 
WESS Training March 22
-
24
 
 
3
 
Safety . . . Page 3
 
-
Safety
 
Last year about this time, I informed you that contrary to common belief March was
not
the windiest month of the year, and that April was instead. Well, I must have used the national average for this determination since my recent inquiry into the NOAA files actually reveals somewhat different results. It appears that, using only the four AL reporting points (Huntsville, Birmingham, Montgomery and Mobile) that March average winds actually
do
 exceed April’s by a slight amount. My apologies for manipulating facts to make my point at the time. Maybe, I should really be in politics! Anyway, it allows me to again emphasize the upcoming winds as a factor in our flying activities and, not only for March, but in April as well. Alright, we already knew that March was the best for flying kites, but how about airplanes?
 
I have always believed that a pilot must be able to reasonably negotiate all normal conditions that may confront them and, even though they may not be as expert at some situations as others, they must persevere in their attempts to master all situations. March weather, and especially the strong and gusty winds, will give us all a really good chance to master the art of crosswind landings and handling gusts as well. Of course we cannot exceed the CAP regulation of a maximum of 15 knots of crosswind component in our practice but you may want to brush up on how that is calculated for a given runway and reported wind condition (if you haven’t done that since getting your private, you may want to dust off that rotary slide rule or electronic equivalent).
 
We operate out of a single runway airport (PLR) and most of the other ones we use are somewhat of the same bent so selecting another runway to take off or land on is really not an option. There will probably be some crosswind component to deal with during a large percentage of our flying activities. Where to find them if you are looking for them? You need not go far away. If the winds are right down the runway at PLR, Anniston (ANB) with a 5
-
23 runway offers a variation and if that is not enough try Sylacauga (SCD) with a 9
-
27 or Gadsden (GAD) with 6
-
24 and 18
-
36 runways. Again, I will remind you to not exceed the 15 knot crosswind rule. If you aren’t feeling confident enough to challenge some robust crosswinds on your own, by all means grab one of our excellent CFI’s and take them along. The point is, don’t hobble your flying opportunities with a fear of crosswinds when they should be entirely within the capabilities of your aircraft and your pilot’s rating. So you don’t feel too bad about your crosswind and gust capabilities, but you want to know the best techniques to handle them? Again, I defer to our CFI’s on this but here are some things I like to do and they have been endorsed by a least some of our CFI’s.
 
On final, I prefer to use the crab method at a few hundred feet and then switch to the forward slip just a few feet above the runway. The ultimate goal, of course, is to have the nose of the airplane pointing directly down the runway at touchdown. If you don’t, you most surely will be in for a sharp turn on the runway in one direction or the other. My justification for delaying the slip until the last moment is that crosswinds are almost greater in strength at altitude and my strongest maneuver is the crab and my weakest is the slip. Some will say that you should use the slip at a higher altitude and you will find out if it is strong enough to counteract the crosswind or not and you can make a go
-
around at higher altitude. Both methods have merits, and you should practice them enough to make your selected method second nature and not something you should be deciding on short final in gusty conditions. Speaking of gusts, you should allow a few knots (half of the runway direction gust factor) when you are on final and realize that a squeaker landing in these kind of conditions is not something to pursue.  A good, firm, main wheel landing with the nose pointed down the runway is really
 perfection
 in most of these conditions.
 
Stay Safe! Ron Harlan, 118 Safety Officer 
 
 
Reminder: Read the newsletter and receive a Safety Briefing Credit. Please email Ron Harlan at
-
 reh1685@aol.com
 

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