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Health and Human Services: issue31

Health and Human Services: issue31

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Published by: HHS on Jan 30, 2008
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09/06/2012

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T
his issue of the
Child Care Bulletin
focuses on improv-ing infant and toddler child care,an important and challengingissue for parents, caregivers,communities, and government.Approximately one out of everythree children who receive caresubsidized by the Child Careand Development Fund (CCDF)is younger than 3 years old. TheChild Care Bureau is commit-ted to ensuring all babies andtoddlers are safe, healthy, andreceiving the care they need tothrive and succeed in schooland in life.
Issue 31Spring 2006
U.S. Department of Health 
and Human Services
Administration for Childrenand FamiliesAdministration on Children,Youth and FamiliesChild Care Bureau
Child CareBulletin
We have engaged State and local partners, alongwith national organizations and funders, to discussbuilding a continuum of care for children from birthto 5 years, which meets the unique developmentalneeds of children at each point in their growth anddevelopment. We have sponsored two National Infant& Toddler Child Care Institutes to focus on the needsof babies and toddlers, and we have worked closelywith our colleagues at the Head Start Bureau to bringincreased attention to systems development issues atthe annual Birth to Three Institute. The National Infant& Toddler Child Care Initiative is using a systemsdevelopment approach guided by an
ecomodel 
thatis a framework for thinking about systems of care. Thisapproach provides tremendous potential for seeingEarly Head Start and other infant and toddler servicesas part of an integrated network of supports for babies,their families, and other caregivers.The Child Care Bureau supports efforts to build a con-tinuum of care at the State and local levels that offersa range of support to all those who care for children,including parents and relative caregivers. This couldinclude an emphasis on educating parents, strength-ening parents’ roles, and reaching out to family mem-bers and friends who play a key caregiving role.The Child Care Bureau’s work to improve the qualityof infant and toddler child care is built on the ideathat there is a role for everyone—researchers, nationalorganizations, funders, and State and communitypolicy and program leaders. We challenge you tothink about what you can do to improve the care of infants and toddlers, as well as support parents asprimary caregivers and children’s first teachers. As theCCDF and Temporary Assistance for Needy Familiesprograms work more closely together to help low-income working parents and their children prepare forgreater success in school and in life, we know we cancount on your assistance, expertise, and creativity.
Fast Fact
An average of 492,000children ages birth to3 years are served eachmonth by the Child Careand Development Fund.
Source: Child Care Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Depart-ment of Health and Human Services. (2005, September 19). [Number of childrenages birth to 3 served each month by CCDF]. Unpublished, and based on ACF-801FFY 2003 CCDF data.
The Building Blocks of Care
Shannon Christian,Associate Commissionerof the Child Care Bureau
The Child Care Bureau is dedicated to helping States and Ter-ritories build their capacity and infrastructure for infant and tod-dler child care. Each year, approximately $100 million of CCDFfunds are earmarked to increase the supply of quality child carefor infants and toddlers. During the last three years, the Child CareBureau has invested in targeted technical assistance to States withthe creation of the National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiativeat ZERO TO THREE. We also have asked many of our other ChildCare Technical Assistance Network partners to devote attention tothe needs of infants and toddlers through regional and nationalconferences, in our research with the Child Care Policy ResearchConsortium, and now with this issue of the
Child Care Bulletin
, a joint effort of the National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiativeand the National Child Care Information Center.
 
Child Care BulletinIssue 312
The National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiative
T
he National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiative atZERO TO THREE, a project of the Child Care Bureau,was developed in 2002 to help State and Territory ChildCare and Development Fund Administrators improve thequality of infant and toddler child care. Over the last threeyears, 20 States and Territories have worked with the Initia-tive, and the diverse group of experts advising the project,to develop a systemic approach focusing on the needs of children younger than 3 years. An external evaluation was acritical component of the project’s design and assisted boththe national staff and the State teams in focusing their effortsand moving forward. Supported by the Initiative’s techni-cal assistance, including Child Care Bureau–sponsorednational meetings, participating States and Territories havedeveloped short- and long-term improvement plans, andhave already accomplished the following:Developed new licensing regulations for infant andtoddler care;Created early learning guidelines for children youngerthan 3 years;Evaluated professional development systems toimprove training for infant and toddler caregivers;Developed infant and toddler credentials articulatedto, or counting toward, associate and bachelordegrees;Built and strengthened infant/toddler specialistnetworks;Developed public awareness efforts;
Explored financing options; andDeveloped outreach efforts for new parents.In 2005, the Initiative began the second phase of the proj-ect and is working with States, Territories, and other part-ners through Learning Communities and other approachesto develop a deeper knowledge of specific elements of the early care and education system which support qualityinfant and toddler child care.The Initiative’s Web site is an important tool for Statesand Territories as they work to improve the quality andsupply of infant and toddler child care. Online resourcesinclude profiles for all States and Territories and informa-tion on babies, toddlers, their families, and the child caresystem that serves them. The site also includes a search-able database with information on infant and toddler childcare initiatives across the country, along with fact sheets,presentations, issue briefs, and other resources. Visit
http:// nccic.acf.hhs.gov/itcc 
to access these resources.
For additional information, contact:National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiative ZERO TO THREE 2000 M Street NW, Suite 200 Washington, DC 20036-3307 Phone: 202-857-2673Fax: 202-638-0851E-mail: itcc@zerotothree.org Web: http://nccic.acf.hhs.gov/itcc 
The
Child Care Bulletin 
is published quarterly by the National Child Care Information Center under the direction of theChild Care Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Administration for Children and Families (ACF),U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).Let us know what you think! Send questions and comments to:
 Amy Shillady, Editor/Publications ManagerNational Child Care Information Center10530 Rosehaven Street, Suite 400, Fairfax, VA 22030Voice: 800-616-2242 TTY: 800-516-2242 Fax: 800-716-2242Web: http://nccic.acf.hhs.gov E-mail: ashillady@nccic.orgInternet access to ACF and the Child Care Bureau: www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ccb
The
Child Care Bulletin 
is published for information purposes only. No official endorsement of any practice, researchfinding, publication, or individual by ACF or HHS is intended or should be inferred.
 
 
Child Care BulletinIssue 313When Juanita opens the door of her child careprogram every morning, her thoughts are on thechildren, the teachers, the families, and making her business work. After Calvin hands his baby daughter to Juanita, he is able to head to work with confidencethat while he is away, his child can be happy, healthy,and secure.
A System Model Approach toInfant and Toddler Child Care
 Juanita’s program is supported by a variety of policies, reg-ulations, resources, and learning opportunities that con-tribute to the quality care she provides. Calvin has supportto help pay the fee for child care because of the avail-ability of child care subsidy funding, and he found ahigh-quality program with the help of his local child careresource and referral agency. These elements are part of the early care and education system that supports qualitycare for young children and their families.The word
system
describes how elements needed tocreate and maintain the child care services we dependon have been brought together through planning,financing, and effective policy-making. Buildingon earlier work, the National Infant & ToddlerChild Care Initiative at ZERO TO THREE hascreated an
ecomodel 
that depicts a systemthat supports quality infant and toddlerchild care.
1–3
Fourteen key elements are includedwithin the system model. At the centerof the system is the baby, emphasiz-ing that the purpose of the systemis to ensure each infant or toddler issafe, healthy, nurtured, nourished,and engaged in activities that pro-mote healthy development when innon-parental care. The elements areplaced on different rings—the closer tothe center, the more direct impact theelement has on infants and toddlers. Thelayering of the rings shows that the elementseach affect, and are affected by, the others andare also interdependent to varying degrees.
Direct Services and Infrastructure
The two inner rings of the ecomodel represent directservices to children and families. The innermost ring rep-resents the need for caregivers to be knowledgeable, con-nected to resources, and active in ongoing professionaldevelopment. This same ring represents the need for parentsto have good information on infant and toddler develop-ment and to participate in the planning and system devel-opment efforts of programs that serve their children. Thenext concentric ring signifies the contribution of positivecaregiver-baby relationships and interactions, the facilities,and program activities to a program’s quality.
 
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