Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Everyday Graces

Everyday Graces

Ratings: (0)|Views: 89|Likes:
Published by Katherine Murray
A book of short reflections on the small-and-sacred blessings in everyday life. :)
A book of short reflections on the small-and-sacred blessings in everyday life. :)

More info:

Published by: Katherine Murray on Sep 12, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/27/2010

pdf

text

original

 
 
    f   r   e   e    d   o   m
 
   p   e   a   c   e
    b   e   a   u   t   y
This short book of essays is a collection of pieces from Practical ~faith~(a blog on faith and life), the newsletter Openings I wrote during thelate 1990s, and other miscellaneous writings.
reVisions Plus, Inc.www.revisionsplus.com/practicalfaith.htmlkmurray230@sbcglobal.net
Everyday Graces
 by Katherine Murray© 2009
 
 
Everyday Graces
Table of Contents
The First Day of First Grade .......................................................................................... 3Born in a Barn............................................................................................................... 5Decisions, Decisions ..................................................................................................... 7Give Your Gift .............................................................................................................. 8Filling the Gaps .......................................................................................................... 10Not Knowing.............................................................................................................. 12Morning on the Monon Trail....................................................................................... 14An Immanuel Moment ............................................................................................... 16Expectantly Yours ...................................................................................................... 18The Beauty of a Face ................................................................................................... 20Thank Goodness for Cap'n Crunch ............................................................................. 22Cars and Colors .......................................................................................................... 23Rubber Mats ............................................................................................................... 26The Suddenly Sacred .................................................................................................. 29
 
one
The First Day of First Grade
 Just a few hours ago, I drove through the drizzly gray morning, taking my 6-year-oldson Cameron to his first day of first grade. He'd been up since 6:00 am, ready since 6:30,with his school-supply-filled bookbag packed and positioned by the front door sinceyesterday. During the three-minute drive, we talked about first days--about my firstdays, about other first days. "Were you ever nervous?" he asked."Sure," I said. "I was always nervous the first day.""Did you tell your parents you were nervous?" he wanted to know.The weight of memory hit me. "No," I said. "I guess I didn't."Pulling into the parking lot, we saw a colorful, smiling group--parents whose arms werefilled with bookbags, lunchboxes, and papers, somehow at the same time holding thehands of their youngsters, guiding and cautioning, watching cars, gauging traffic,navigating their children to the front door of the school building.Cameron and I joined the flow, carrying his bookbag and lunchbox and papers. Hedidn't want me to hold his hand. As we were swept in with the other parents andchildren, I tried to fight the lemming-like feeling, that tightness that was growing in mychest. Inside, we found his room; we found his desk. His name was written, in thestandard Denealian form we are supposed to practice every evening, on a tag on themauve metal side. He sat down in the chair. His knees were too tall for the desk. Too bigon the outside, I thought, but too small on the inside--too small to be facing entire daysin a classroom, too little to have to rein in all that jittery joy that makes him jump andsing and twirl spontaneously in the checkout line, at the library, anywhere at all. I kissedhim twice, quickly, on the top of the head, making the Mommy noises that come sonaturally. "You have a good day, okay? I'm just three minutes away, remember. Listen tothe teacher and don't be afraid to ask questions if you don't understand something.Have a great time, okay? I'm proud of you, sweetie." He mumbled something from amouth made of marble that was an acknowledgement of what I said but meant, "Really,Mom, that's enough. Go away and let me figure this out."I stopped and waved twice on my way to the door; he waved quickly and looked away.His eyes were big worried saucers. Outside in the parking lot I felt like I'd eitherabandoned him or left an important part of myself behind. Or both.

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
john7162 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->