Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Henry Fielding, A Journey From This World to the Next

Henry Fielding, A Journey From This World to the Next

Ratings: (0)|Views: 55 |Likes:
Published by dan mihalache
See more on my sites: http://danmihalache.wordpress.com/continut-legislatie/

Henry Fielding, (1707-1754)
British writer, playwright and journalist, founder of the English Realistic school in literature with Samuel Richardson. Fielding’s career as a dramatist has been shadowed by his fame as a novelist, who undertook the duty of writing comic epic poems in prose – Fielding once described himself as “great, tattered bard.”
“When I’m not thanked at all, I’m thanked enough;
I’ve done my duty, and I’ve done no more.”
(from Tom Thumb the Great, 1730)
Henry Fielding was born at Sharpham Park, Somerset. He was by birth a gentleman, close allied to the aristocracy. His father was a nephew of the 3th Earl of Denbigha, and mother was from a prominent family of lawyers. Fielding grew up on his parents farm at East Stour, Dotset. His mother died when Fielding was eleven, and when his father remarried, Henry was sent to Eton College (1719-1724), where he learned to love ancient Greek and Roman literature. During this period he also befriended George, later Lord, Lyttelton, and William Pitt, later Lord Chatham. To Lyttelton, his old school friend, who helped him from the late 1740s, Fielding dedicated the novel THE HISTORY OF TOM JONES, A FOUNDLING (1749). After Eton, he attempted to elope with his cousin Sarah Andrew.
Encouraged by his cousin, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Fielding began his literary career in London. In 1728 he wrote two plays, of which LOVE IN SEVERAL MASQUES, performed at Drury Lane, ran only four nights. In the same year he went to the University of Leiden in the Netherlands, enlarging his knowledge of classical literature. After returning to England, he devoted himself to writing for the stage. Under the pseudonym ‘Sciblerus Secundus’ he wrote comic-satirical burlesques, which made him the most successful playwrigh for several years in the British theatre. Fielding also became a manager of the Little Theatre in the Haymarket. In 1730 he had four plays produced, among them TOM THUMB, which is his most famous and popular drama, particularly in its revised version, THE TRAGEDY OF TRAGEDIES (1731). According to a story, it made Swift laugh for the second time in his life. In 1736 Fielding took over the management of the New Theatre, writing for it among others the satirical comedy PASQUIN. For several years Fielding’s life was happy and prosperous.
However, Fielding’s sharp burlesques satirizing the government gained the attention of the prime minister Sir Robert Walpole and Fielding’s activities in theater was ended by Theatrical Licensing Act – directed primarily at him. In search for an alternative career he became editor of the magazine Champion, an opposition journal. After studies of law Fielding was called in 1740 to the bar. Because of increasing illness – he suffered from gout and asthma – Fielding was eventually unable to continue as a Westminster justice. Physically Fielding was impressive, he was over six feet tall, with a “frame of a body large, and remarkably robust,” as his first biographer, Arthur Murphy recorded. He was also known as a man with a great appetite for food, alcohol and tobacco; the joys of the rich diet he celebrated in the song ‘The Roast Beef of Old England’.
Between the years 1729 and 1737 Fielding wrote 25 plays but he acclaimed critical notice with his novels, The History of Tom Jones, A Foundling, and THE HISTORY OF THE ADVENTURES OF JOSEPH ANDREWS (1742), a parody of Richardson’s Pamela (1740).
Although Fielding said in Tom Jones, “That monstrous animal, a husband and wife”, he married in 1734 Charlotte Cradock, who became his model for Sophia Western in Tom Jones and for the heroine of AMELIA, the author’s last novel. It was written according to Fielding “to promote the cause of virtue and to expose some of the most glaring evils, as well public as private, which at present infect the country…” In the story an army officer is imprisoned. His virtuous wife resists all temptations and st
See more on my sites: http://danmihalache.wordpress.com/continut-legislatie/

Henry Fielding, (1707-1754)
British writer, playwright and journalist, founder of the English Realistic school in literature with Samuel Richardson. Fielding’s career as a dramatist has been shadowed by his fame as a novelist, who undertook the duty of writing comic epic poems in prose – Fielding once described himself as “great, tattered bard.”
“When I’m not thanked at all, I’m thanked enough;
I’ve done my duty, and I’ve done no more.”
(from Tom Thumb the Great, 1730)
Henry Fielding was born at Sharpham Park, Somerset. He was by birth a gentleman, close allied to the aristocracy. His father was a nephew of the 3th Earl of Denbigha, and mother was from a prominent family of lawyers. Fielding grew up on his parents farm at East Stour, Dotset. His mother died when Fielding was eleven, and when his father remarried, Henry was sent to Eton College (1719-1724), where he learned to love ancient Greek and Roman literature. During this period he also befriended George, later Lord, Lyttelton, and William Pitt, later Lord Chatham. To Lyttelton, his old school friend, who helped him from the late 1740s, Fielding dedicated the novel THE HISTORY OF TOM JONES, A FOUNDLING (1749). After Eton, he attempted to elope with his cousin Sarah Andrew.
Encouraged by his cousin, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Fielding began his literary career in London. In 1728 he wrote two plays, of which LOVE IN SEVERAL MASQUES, performed at Drury Lane, ran only four nights. In the same year he went to the University of Leiden in the Netherlands, enlarging his knowledge of classical literature. After returning to England, he devoted himself to writing for the stage. Under the pseudonym ‘Sciblerus Secundus’ he wrote comic-satirical burlesques, which made him the most successful playwrigh for several years in the British theatre. Fielding also became a manager of the Little Theatre in the Haymarket. In 1730 he had four plays produced, among them TOM THUMB, which is his most famous and popular drama, particularly in its revised version, THE TRAGEDY OF TRAGEDIES (1731). According to a story, it made Swift laugh for the second time in his life. In 1736 Fielding took over the management of the New Theatre, writing for it among others the satirical comedy PASQUIN. For several years Fielding’s life was happy and prosperous.
However, Fielding’s sharp burlesques satirizing the government gained the attention of the prime minister Sir Robert Walpole and Fielding’s activities in theater was ended by Theatrical Licensing Act – directed primarily at him. In search for an alternative career he became editor of the magazine Champion, an opposition journal. After studies of law Fielding was called in 1740 to the bar. Because of increasing illness – he suffered from gout and asthma – Fielding was eventually unable to continue as a Westminster justice. Physically Fielding was impressive, he was over six feet tall, with a “frame of a body large, and remarkably robust,” as his first biographer, Arthur Murphy recorded. He was also known as a man with a great appetite for food, alcohol and tobacco; the joys of the rich diet he celebrated in the song ‘The Roast Beef of Old England’.
Between the years 1729 and 1737 Fielding wrote 25 plays but he acclaimed critical notice with his novels, The History of Tom Jones, A Foundling, and THE HISTORY OF THE ADVENTURES OF JOSEPH ANDREWS (1742), a parody of Richardson’s Pamela (1740).
Although Fielding said in Tom Jones, “That monstrous animal, a husband and wife”, he married in 1734 Charlotte Cradock, who became his model for Sophia Western in Tom Jones and for the heroine of AMELIA, the author’s last novel. It was written according to Fielding “to promote the cause of virtue and to expose some of the most glaring evils, as well public as private, which at present infect the country…” In the story an army officer is imprisoned. His virtuous wife resists all temptations and st

More info:

Published by: dan mihalache on Sep 13, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/20/2011

pdf

text

original

 
INTRODUCTION
Whether the ensuing pages were really the dream or vision of some very pious and holy person; or whether they were really written in the other world, and sent back to this,which is the opinion of many (though I think too much inclining to superstition); or lastly,whether, as infinitely the greatest part imagine, they were really the production of somechoice inhabitant of New Bethlehem, is not necessary nor easy to determine. It will beabundantly sufficient if I give the reader an account by what means they came into my possession. Mr. Robert Powney, stationer, who dwells opposite to Catherine-street in theStrand, a very honest man and of great gravity of countenance; who, among other excellent stationery commodities, is particularly eminent for his pens, which I amabundantly bound to acknowledge, as I owe to their peculiar goodness that mymanuscripts have by any means been legible: this gentleman, I say, furnished me sometime since with a bundle of those pens, wrapped up with great care and caution, in a verylarge sheet of paper full of characters, written as it seemed in a very bad hand. Now, Ihave a surprising curiosity to read everything which is almost illegible; partly perhapsfrom the sweet remembrance of the dear Scrawls, Skrawls, or Skrales (for the word isvariously spelled), which I have in my youth received from that lovely part of thecreation for which I have the tenderest regard; and partly from that temper of mind whichmakes men set an immense value on old manuscripts so effaced, bustoes so maimed, and pictures so black that no one can tell what to make of them. I therefore perused this sheetwith wonderful application, and in about a day's time discovered that I could notunderstand it. I immediately repaired to Mr. Powney, and inquired very eagerly whether he had not more of the same manuscript? He produced about one hundred pages,acquainting me that he had saved no more; but that the book was originally a huge folio,had been left in his garret by a gentleman who lodged there, and who had left him noother satisfaction for nine months' lodging. He proceeded to inform me that themanuscript had been hawked about (as he phrased it) among all the booksellers, whorefused to meddle; some alleged that they could not read, others that they could notunderstand it. Some would haze it to be an atheistical book, and some that it was a libelon the government; for one or other of which reasons they all refused to print it. That ithad been likewise shown to the R—l Society, but they shook their heads, saying, therewas nothing in it wonderful enough for them. That, hearing the gentleman was gone tothe West-Indies, and believing it to be good for nothing else, he had used it as waste paper. He said I was welcome to what remained, and he was heartily sorry for what wasmissing, as I seemed to set some value on it.I desired him much to name a price: but he would receive no consideration farther thanthe payment of a small bill I owed him, which at that time he said he looked on as somuch money given him.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->